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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2005 | From a Times staff writer
In his Doonesbury comic strip, Garry Trudeau has been paying tribute this week to Hunter S. Thompson, who was the inspiration for the character Uncle Duke. And now Rolling Stone magazine, where Thompson did some of his best writing, is joining the chorus with a 30-page spread on the journalist, who committed suicide on Feb. 20 at age 67.
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NATIONAL
August 15, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
The Massachusetts state trooper who was suspended after he angrily released photos of the Boston bombing manhunt has been put on patrol, state police said Thursday. Massachusetts State Police Sgt. Sean Murphy is still under internal investigation for releasing police photographs of the capture of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev after Rolling Stone magazine published a front-page photo that some people said glamorized the suspected bomber. Murphy was transferred to the state trooper barracks in Athol, Mass., last week, after briefly taking a desk assignment while awaiting a transfer, officials said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1988
Rolling Stone magazine has agreed to publish follow-up articles on Koreans and Korean-Americans, set up an internship program for Asian-American students and take other steps to ease the ill feeling stirred by publication of a recent article on Korea, it was announced Wednesday. Asian community figures in Los Angeles had demanded an apology for the Feb. 11 article, titled "Seoul Brothers," which they contended portrayed Koreans in stereotypical terms.
SPORTS
June 23, 2013 | By Helene Elliott
Top-seeded Serena Williams, who will begin pursuit of her 17th Grand Slam title on Tuesday when she faces Mandy Minella of Luxembourg on Wimbledon's famed Center Court, on Sunday apologized for comments about a teenage rape victim in Steubenville, Ohio, and “everything that was said” in a recent Rolling Stone profile of her. She also said she planned to keep her focus on tennis this week. “There's one thing I'm really good at, and that's hitting the ball over a net, in a box. I'm excellent,” she said at a pre-tournament news conference . Williams also repeated that she had apologized to the Steubenville victim for saying the girl “shouldn't have put herself in that position.” Williams also said she had reached out to rival Maria Sharapova on Thursday to apologize for comments in that article that were presumed to be about Sharapova.
NEWS
May 11, 2006 | Geoff Boucher
The cover of Rolling Stone magazine has been coveted, mocked, debated and even sung about (remember the tongue-in-cheek 1970s hit "The Cover of the Rolling Stone," penned by Shel Silverstein and performed by Dr. Hook?), but with the issue now on stands, it takes on a whole new dimension: It's 3-D. For the 1,000th issue of Rolling Stone, 2 million copies were printed with a detachable, hard-plastic cover that gives you the illusion of depth and, if you stare at it too long, a bit of a headache.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2002 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What's going on with Rolling Stone magazine? It's a common question these days, and you can tell a lot about the person asking it by the degree of frustration in the voice. Anyone who thinks the Sept. 19 issue of the rock magazine--the first under a new editorial mandate that will reportedly deliver shorter stories and flashier design features--is reason to start shedding tears must not have been paying attention to the magazine for a l-o-n-g time.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2007 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
The threat on the lawyer's fancy letterhead arrived at the scruffy offices of Straight Arrow Publishers in San Francisco in early November 1967. The note warned a young entrepreneur named Jann S. Wenner to abandon his new venture: "The use of the name Rolling Stone is clearly an attempt to confuse the public," was the terse message from the attorney for a certain British rock band. "Unless you immediately cease and desist...." Wenner did not cease and desist.
NEWS
August 10, 1993 | BOB SIPCHEN
Remember the Woodstock Era? Remember the folks who dropped acid, painted their faces and groped naked in the mud while Crosby, Stills & Nash sang, "Teach your children well?" Well, they and their younger siblings have finally grown up. They've had kids. And now they must ask themselves a tough question: Is "hip parent" synonymous with "embarrassing dork" or merely an oxymoron?
NEWS
June 26, 1997
Well, we're big rock singers, we got golden fingers and we're loved everywhere we go. We sing about beauty and we sing about truth at $10,000 a show . . . --"The Cover of 'Rolling Stone' " They didn't sing. They didn't have golden fingers. And they weren't paid, but hundreds of makeup groupies--most of whom weren't even born when Dr.
NEWS
January 15, 2004
Hall of Fame: Rolling Stone magazine publisher Jann Wenner will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on March 15 in the hall's non-performer category.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
The structure is simple, the guitar riffs basic, the lyrics at best inane, but the Troggs' " Wild Thing" remains a garage-rock classic more than 45 years after its 1966 release made the British group and lead singer Reg Presley international stars. Presley, whose raunchy, suggestive voice powered the paean to teenage lust, died Monday at his Andover, England, home after a yearlong struggle with lung cancer, his agent, Keith Altham, announced. He was 71. Part of the British invasion spurred by the Beatles and the Rolling Stones, the Troggs perfected a simple, hard-driving approach to the three-minute rock song that was miles away from the lyrical art-rock of the Beatles.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, Washington Bureau
Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, called Thursday for an investigation into allegations that an Army general ordered military personnel trained in psychological operations to manipulate visiting U.S. lawmakers into providing additional funding and support. Rolling Stone magazine reported online that Lt. Gen. William B. Caldwell IV, the commander of the American mission to train Afghan security forces, put pressure on "psy-op" soldiers, in violation of federal law, "to target visiting senators and other VIPs," including Sens.
WORLD
June 22, 2010 | By Julian E. Barnes and Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, the commander of Western forces in Afghanistan, was summoned to Washington on Tuesday to explain unflattering comments about senior members of the Obama administration that appeared in a magazine profile. Earlier in the day, before his planned departure from Afghanistan, McChrystal issued a statement apologizing for the remarks that appeared in a forthcoming profile in Rolling Stone magazine. The dismissive comments were a "mistake reflecting poor judgment," he said.
SPORTS
March 26, 2010 | T.J. Simers
The megalomaniac I know would have gone off for 60 when told the guy he was playing against was now deemed better. He would have dunked off the jump ball, taking it as a personal challenge to set the record straight. He would never let such a thought take seed, slapping the upstart aside with an ESPN highlight show, forcing the SportsCenter announcers to proclaim his greatness again. So what happened to Kobe Bryant , and for that matter, his slapstick supporting cast Friday night?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2009 | ANN POWERS, POP MUSIC CRITIC
The days of "don't ask, don't tell" are over for Adam Lambert. Rolling Stone magazine has posted a preview of the cover story in which Lambert unabashedly confirms his homosexuality, and the excerpts online indicate that, from this day forward, this season's groundbreaking "Idol" expects the media and his fans to accept him for who he is, with neither scandalized whispers nor rainbow flag-waving rallies of support.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Rolling Stone magazine is shrinking with the times. After more than four decades of standing out with a larger format than other magazines, it will look like everyone else starting with the Oct. 30 issue, due out this week. The adoption of a standard format could boost single-copy sales and reduce production costs for advertising inserts such as scent strips and tear-out postcards. The magazine says any cost savings, though, will be offset by the inclusion of more pages and the shift to thicker, glossier paper.
REAL ESTATE
August 20, 2000 | Inman News Features
Where do you go if you want to reach an audience that is young, yet successful enough to buy their first home and tech-savvy enough to start that search on the Internet? The pages of Rolling Stone magazine, of course. At least that's the strategy being adopted by Homescape.com. The company is trying to reach young singles to pitch them on becoming home buyers. The site will soon start advertising in the pages of Rolling Stone magazine, half of whose readers are between the ages of 18 and 24.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Rolling Stone Says Nothing Compares: Sinead O'Connor is scorning the Grammys, but she's delighted with the "artist of the year" nod accorded her by both the readers and critics of Rolling Stone magazine. "She's very happy with the honor. It's not the same thing as the Grammys at all," Elaine Shock, the Irish singer-songwriter's publicist, said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2007 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
Anti-smoking activists Tuesday praised the attorneys general of California and seven other states for suing cigarette maker R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. for allegedly violating the terms of a decade-old agreement banning the use of cartoon characters in advertisements. The California complaint was filed in San Diego County Superior Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2007 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
The threat on the lawyer's fancy letterhead arrived at the scruffy offices of Straight Arrow Publishers in San Francisco in early November 1967. The note warned a young entrepreneur named Jann S. Wenner to abandon his new venture: "The use of the name Rolling Stone is clearly an attempt to confuse the public," was the terse message from the attorney for a certain British rock band. "Unless you immediately cease and desist...." Wenner did not cease and desist.
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