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Rollo May

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NEWS
October 24, 1994 | From Times Wire and Staff Reports
Rollo May, a founding father of existential and humanistic psychology and the man who introduced a generation to the so-called Age of Anxiety, has died here. He was 85. May, who died Saturday, was renowned for his pioneering theories on human behavior and for the witty, stylish prose with which his dozen groundbreaking books brought psychology to the general public.
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NEWS
October 24, 1994 | From Times Wire and Staff Reports
Rollo May, a founding father of existential and humanistic psychology and the man who introduced a generation to the so-called Age of Anxiety, has died here. He was 85. May, who died Saturday, was renowned for his pioneering theories on human behavior and for the witty, stylish prose with which his dozen groundbreaking books brought psychology to the general public.
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BOOKS
January 12, 1986 | Kenneth Atchity, Atchity has just published "A Writer's Time: A Guide to the Creative Process From Vision Through Revision" (Norton).
Rollo May begins his essay on personal aesthetics with an epigraph from Walter Pater: "To burn always with this hard, gemlike flame,/to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life." The ideal May establishes is clear and attractive, reminiscent of Jose Ortega y Gasset's imperative: "I think the only immoral thing is for a being not to live every instant of its life with the utmost intensity."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1987 | Associated Press
Psychologist Rollo May says the field he helped establish in the 1950s has become dominated by gimmicks and money-making. "It's become dominated by gimmicks. There are more than 200 kinds of psychotherapy now, including one to help your pets," May told a recent gathering of more than 200 therapists in Berkeley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1987 | Associated Press
Psychologist Rollo May says the field he helped establish in the 1950s has become dominated by gimmicks and money-making. "It's become dominated by gimmicks. There are more than 200 kinds of psychotherapy now, including one to help your pets," May told a recent gathering of more than 200 therapists in Berkeley.
BOOKS
September 18, 1994
Regarding Peter Rainier's review of Alexander Theroux's "The Primary Colors" (August 28): An art instructor years ago said that the reason Picasso went through his "Blue Period" was that blue was the cheapest pigment and Pablo didn't have much money at the time. So when I read the quote from Alexander Theroux's essay "Blue" saying that blue was always the most expensive pigment I had a good chortle. Also I remember spending more for vermilion than cobalt 20-30 years ago. Not since reading Rollo May say in "The Cry for Myth" that Lindbergh flew the Atlantic in a biplane have I had as good a laugh at someone trying to be serious.
BOOKS
December 29, 1985 | Marilee Zdenek, Zdenek's latest book is "The Right-Brain Experience" (McGraw-Hill). and
"Imagine there is no clock; imagine there is no time past, time present, time future. We and the universe are patterns of change. We are becoming and in that becoming we must encompass everything that has ever been. The original background radiation of the big bang, all the atoms, all the evolution of life is encompassed and enfolded by us."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1990 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 6,000 counselors and psychologists gathered Thursday at the Anaheim Convention Center to hear some of the world's leaders in psychotherapy discuss their disparate views of treating mental illness. Among the luminaries here through Sunday: philosopher and psychologist Rollo May, existential psychiatrist Viktor Frankl who long ago knew the father of psychotherapy, Sigmund Freud; sexual disorders therapist Helen Singer Kaplan; and activist Betty Friedan.
BOOKS
January 12, 1986 | Kenneth Atchity, Atchity has just published "A Writer's Time: A Guide to the Creative Process From Vision Through Revision" (Norton).
Rollo May begins his essay on personal aesthetics with an epigraph from Walter Pater: "To burn always with this hard, gemlike flame,/to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life." The ideal May establishes is clear and attractive, reminiscent of Jose Ortega y Gasset's imperative: "I think the only immoral thing is for a being not to live every instant of its life with the utmost intensity."
BUSINESS
December 17, 1991 | DANIEL AKST
Like many people, I offer unconscious homage to Proust every time I try to read him, which is to say that I doze off. But I did get far enough--three times, in fact--to know that eating a funny little cake with tea unleashed a flood of memories in the narrator of Swann's Way.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1988 | JAN HERMAN
How a high-minded television program manages to survive week after week in a medium notable for its trivialization of reasoned public discourse has to be one of the great mysteries. But every Sunday morning on KOCE-TV Channel 50, which broadcasts from Huntington Beach, "Quest for Peace" host John M. Whiteley goes up against the likes of PGA golf, NBA basketball, preseason baseball, old movies and kiddie cartoons.
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