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WORLD
August 12, 2013 | By Tom Kington
ROME - The newly elected mayor of Rome plans to radically redraw the map of the Eternal City by ripping up a busy road routed through a vast archaeological site by the fascist dictator Benito Mussolini. Ignazio Marino, who trained and worked as a surgeon in the United States before returning to Italy to enter politics, said he planned to create "a completely new urban setup" in Rome by reuniting the excavated Roman Forum and the imperial forums of Trajan, Augustus, Caesar and Nerva in one massive archaeological park.
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WORLD
August 12, 2013 | By Tom Kington
ROME - The newly elected mayor of Rome plans to radically redraw the map of the Eternal City by ripping up a busy road routed through a vast archaeological site by the fascist dictator Benito Mussolini. Ignazio Marino, who trained and worked as a surgeon in the United States before returning to Italy to enter politics, said he planned to create "a completely new urban setup" in Rome by reuniting the excavated Roman Forum and the imperial forums of Trajan, Augustus, Caesar and Nerva in one massive archaeological park.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2005 | Ariel David, Associated Press
A sewer might be no place for an emperor, but it is precisely from an ancient drainage system that archeologists have dug up a large marble sculpture of Constantine, one of Rome's greatest leaders. Archeologists found the 24-inch-tall head last week while clearing a sewer in the Roman Forum, the center of public life in the ancient city, said Eugenio La Rocca, superintendent for Rome's monuments.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
It's not often that we get to compare Los Angeles to the Roman Empire, unless we're making fun of the kitschy copy-cat architecture of the Getty Villa. At least in popular stereotype, L.A. and Rome are polar opposites, each one the perfect foil for the other. One city - ours - is unfinished, amnesiac and forward-looking; the other city - theirs - is so obsessed with past glory, its streets piled so high with landmarks and layers of history, that its 21st century personality can be tough to make out. So when I began noticing similarities between an ancient Roman ritual and two huge public events in Los Angeles in 2012, I was tempted to dismiss them out of hand.
NEWS
March 17, 2011
Judging from this photo taken by Los Angeles Times reader "reza_239," this place is a little run down. No wonder, considering that it dates back to ancient times -- though I'd say it's not too shabby. In its day, the Roman Forum was the most important of the city's forums, serving as a place of religious worship, public meetings and government activity. Various caesars treaded on these hallowed grounds. Flash forward a couple of thousand years or so, and the Forum is one of Rome's most popular tourist attractions.
TRAVEL
October 31, 2010 | By Susan Spano, Special to the Los Angeles Times
After living in Rome for almost three years, I moved back to the U.S. at the beginning of the summer. I packed up my apartment, gave my books to friends and left my potted plants for the next tenant. Now someone else is standing at the window overlooking Via Baccina, its west end butted against the Roman Forum, its east end opening onto the little Piazza della Madonna dei Monti. The florist on Via dei Serpenti is teaching someone else the Italian words for "daisy" and "lily," and the woman who sleeps on the stoop next door is getting spare change from another pocketbook.
TRAVEL
August 27, 2000 | DALE M. BROWN
Of the many schemes the cities of the world have devised to mark the new millennium, Rome's offers some of the most permanent benefits. The marble of its churches, palazzos and monuments has been scrubbed clean, glowing with sugar-cube brightness. The face lifts are just the beginning. Old museums have been refurbished, and new ones have opened. And in some places, Rome has managed the all but unthinkable: It has banned traffic, turning about 100 piazzas into oases of calm.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | FRANCES D'EMILIO, Associated Press
One after another, proud symbols of cities and empires are disappearing from public view in Italy, victims of pollution and discouraging testimony that restoration can't rescue every monument and artwork. In Florence, the 15th-Century gilded panels on the east entrance to the Baptistry--a door so beautiful that Michelangelo thought it was fit for Paradise--are destined for specially sealed glass chambers inside a museum. Now blackened and devoured by automobile pollution, the 10 bronze panels were done over a period of 23 years by Lorenzo Ghiberti before his death in 1455.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
It's not often that we get to compare Los Angeles to the Roman Empire, unless we're making fun of the kitschy copy-cat architecture of the Getty Villa. At least in popular stereotype, L.A. and Rome are polar opposites, each one the perfect foil for the other. One city - ours - is unfinished, amnesiac and forward-looking; the other city - theirs - is so obsessed with past glory, its streets piled so high with landmarks and layers of history, that its 21st century personality can be tough to make out. So when I began noticing similarities between an ancient Roman ritual and two huge public events in Los Angeles in 2012, I was tempted to dismiss them out of hand.
NEWS
March 17, 2011
Judging from this photo taken by Los Angeles Times reader "reza_239," this place is a little run down. No wonder, considering that it dates back to ancient times -- though I'd say it's not too shabby. In its day, the Roman Forum was the most important of the city's forums, serving as a place of religious worship, public meetings and government activity. Various caesars treaded on these hallowed grounds. Flash forward a couple of thousand years or so, and the Forum is one of Rome's most popular tourist attractions.
TRAVEL
October 31, 2010 | By Susan Spano, Special to the Los Angeles Times
After living in Rome for almost three years, I moved back to the U.S. at the beginning of the summer. I packed up my apartment, gave my books to friends and left my potted plants for the next tenant. Now someone else is standing at the window overlooking Via Baccina, its west end butted against the Roman Forum, its east end opening onto the little Piazza della Madonna dei Monti. The florist on Via dei Serpenti is teaching someone else the Italian words for "daisy" and "lily," and the woman who sleeps on the stoop next door is getting spare change from another pocketbook.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2005 | Ariel David, Associated Press
A sewer might be no place for an emperor, but it is precisely from an ancient drainage system that archeologists have dug up a large marble sculpture of Constantine, one of Rome's greatest leaders. Archeologists found the 24-inch-tall head last week while clearing a sewer in the Roman Forum, the center of public life in the ancient city, said Eugenio La Rocca, superintendent for Rome's monuments.
TRAVEL
October 1, 2000 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
I can't say I understand it, but there are some people who don't like to travel. And that may be a particular problem for women whose husbands or partners fall into that category. Matti Gershenfeld, a Philadelphia-based psychologist and couples counselor, says she's seen many women who have reached a point in life when the children are grown and there's enough money to travel with the person they love most.
TRAVEL
August 27, 2000 | DALE M. BROWN
Of the many schemes the cities of the world have devised to mark the new millennium, Rome's offers some of the most permanent benefits. The marble of its churches, palazzos and monuments has been scrubbed clean, glowing with sugar-cube brightness. The face lifts are just the beginning. Old museums have been refurbished, and new ones have opened. And in some places, Rome has managed the all but unthinkable: It has banned traffic, turning about 100 piazzas into oases of calm.
TRAVEL
October 1, 2000 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
I can't say I understand it, but there are some people who don't like to travel. And that may be a particular problem for women whose husbands or partners fall into that category. Matti Gershenfeld, a Philadelphia-based psychologist and couples counselor, says she's seen many women who have reached a point in life when the children are grown and there's enough money to travel with the person they love most.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | Associated Press
The government has approved a $245-million budget to give Rome a face-lift and help combat the traffic and pollution in the Eternal City. The package approved Tuesday by the Cabinet includes $107 million for the construction of a government and business complex on 1,600 acres on the eastern edge of the city. At least $15 million was earmarked for an archeological park from the Roman Forum to the Old Appian Way.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | FRANCES D'EMILIO, Associated Press
One after another, proud symbols of cities and empires are disappearing from public view in Italy, victims of pollution and discouraging testimony that restoration can't rescue every monument and artwork. In Florence, the 15th-Century gilded panels on the east entrance to the Baptistry--a door so beautiful that Michelangelo thought it was fit for Paradise--are destined for specially sealed glass chambers inside a museum. Now blackened and devoured by automobile pollution, the 10 bronze panels were done over a period of 23 years by Lorenzo Ghiberti before his death in 1455.
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