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Roman Genn

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NEWS
August 15, 2000
Roman Genn, an artist from South Pasadena, is sketching the convention for The Times. His impression of this scene from Monday's session: "The host committee here is doing a much better job of massaging the media. The Republicans in Philadelphia gave out Tastykakes, but here they're literally massaging them. I tried to get a back rub, but they were booked up a day in advance."
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OPINION
July 15, 2007 | Swati Pandey
MOSCOW-BORN, Los Angeles-based artist Roman Genn has come a long way from drawing Communist propaganda cartoons as child. His incisive caricatures have appeared in magazines and newspapers across the country, often generating controversy with what he's called the "ethnic grievance industry." Now the libertarian-leaning artist has created a series of paintings of political figures from the past and is working on a group of portraits of U.S.
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NEWS
February 11, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Rick VanderKnyff is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition.
Two years ago, Roman Genn was hawking his comic renderings of Soviet political figures on the streets of Moscow. Today, his caricatures of such American faces as Bill Clinton, George Bush and Magic Johnson regularly grace the letters-to-the-editor column of the Los Angeles Times. Genn's odyssey between those two points is a tale marked by both video-age good luck and old-fashioned perseverance. Examples of his work, starting with his days in the then-Soviet Union, are on display through Feb.
NEWS
August 16, 2000
Roman Genn, an artist from South Pasadena, is sketching the convention for The Times. His impression of this scene from Tuesday's session: "Oliver North was in the media area doing his radio show and basically raving. Except for what he's saying, he fits right in there. If you didn't know of him, you wouldn't pick him out from the others. I think a lot of people have forgotten who he is--or never knew."
OPINION
July 15, 2007 | Swati Pandey
MOSCOW-BORN, Los Angeles-based artist Roman Genn has come a long way from drawing Communist propaganda cartoons as child. His incisive caricatures have appeared in magazines and newspapers across the country, often generating controversy with what he's called the "ethnic grievance industry." Now the libertarian-leaning artist has created a series of paintings of political figures from the past and is working on a group of portraits of U.S.
OPINION
March 4, 2007
The trial of music producer Phil Spector, right, will be televised, along with his hair, raising the obvious question: What hairstyles might Spector's jury consultants recommend? Political cartoonist Roman Genn offers three looks. The North Kohawk Likely to appeal to potential jurors with a fetish for Western movies, platform shoes and plutonium The Lost-the-Buzz cut Could win sympathy from washed-up, teen pop divas in and out of rehab in search of a new look The Trump-over Appealing to real estate megalomaniac wannabes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1996
Your editorial on the need to address growing bank ATM fees ("Talking Back to the ATMs," July 29) was on point. Congressional action is certainly called for. But readers should know that state legislation to require on-screen ATM fee disclosure has already been enacted. My bill, AB 3366, signed into law last month, requires banks to disclose ATM fees on screen, and allows customers to back out of transactions without charge. Californians should know that, regardless of federal action, beginning July 1 of next year, they will receive on-screen notification of ATM fees at bank ATMs.
OPINION
February 6, 2005
Why all the upset about editorial cartoons on the front of the Opinion section? Roman Genn's clever piece of satire (Jan. 30) reminds us that words alone, no matter how honestly written, forceful or eloquent, have done little to affect American opinion on the crucial issues of our times, as evidenced by George W. Bush's reelection and the seemingly relentless march of his incredibly incompetent presidency. (The only thing missing in Genn's piece was Condoleezza Rice being slapped upside the head by Barbara Boxer.
OPINION
January 29, 1995
The O.J. Simpson trial (read media circus) has only just begun, and I am sick to death of it. What little interest might have remained was dispelled by the aggressiveness of the shark-like media in their feeding frenzy. Unable to believe that I am the only one suffering from this reaction, I have polled friends and groups, and no one is watching! Where are the people the media insist are eating all this up? Enough, already! Back off! Stop giving the stage to lawyers who are in it because of the high visibility, and to a man who, years ago, excelled in a children's game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 1996
Re "Ezell Unveils Initiative for State-Issued Identity Cards," Jan. 10: We Americans are a goofy, fun-loving bunch. We can't resist high-minded, symbolic quests, as long as they don't get anywhere. The entertaining, former border patrol generalissimo, Harold Ezell, Proposition 187 proponent, now wants a ballot measure to require the Department of Motor Vehicles to issue "tamper-proof" licenses and identity cards. This is supposed to effectively combat illegal immigration. There will be much gnashing of teeth over this, civil libertarians on both the right and left hate the idea, fearing a police state.
NEWS
February 11, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, Rick VanderKnyff is a free-lance writer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition.
Two years ago, Roman Genn was hawking his comic renderings of Soviet political figures on the streets of Moscow. Today, his caricatures of such American faces as Bill Clinton, George Bush and Magic Johnson regularly grace the letters-to-the-editor column of the Los Angeles Times. Genn's odyssey between those two points is a tale marked by both video-age good luck and old-fashioned perseverance. Examples of his work, starting with his days in the then-Soviet Union, are on display through Feb.
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