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Roman Herzog

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May 23, 1994 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An electoral college of 1,324 legislators and "ordinary citizens" will elect Germany's next federal president today in the country's first such election since the unification of the East and West four years ago. Germany's seventh president will have the difficult task of filling the shoes of outgoing President Richard von Weizsaecker, a respected statesman who is the embodiment of how many Germans would like their country to be seen by the rest of the world.
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NEWS
May 24, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Johannes Rau, a smooth-talking moderate in Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's left-leaning Social Democratic Party, won election as Germany's eighth postwar president in a vote in the renovated Reichstag building in Berlin. Rau won an absolute majority in a special federal assembly that convened in the refurbished Parliament building 50 years to the day after the constitution written in the aftermath of Adolf Hitler's dictatorship took effect. He will be sworn in to succeed Roman Herzog on July 1.
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NEWS
May 24, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Johannes Rau, a smooth-talking moderate in Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder's left-leaning Social Democratic Party, won election as Germany's eighth postwar president in a vote in the renovated Reichstag building in Berlin. Rau won an absolute majority in a special federal assembly that convened in the refurbished Parliament building 50 years to the day after the constitution written in the aftermath of Adolf Hitler's dictatorship took effect. He will be sworn in to succeed Roman Herzog on July 1.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roman Herzog of the Christian Democratic Union was elected Germany's seventh postwar president Monday at the end of a day of electoral-college voting that solidified the governing party's position in a key election year but discouraged Germans who believe they should be able to elect their leaders directly.
NEWS
January 18, 1994
The largest two political parties in Chancellor Helmut Kohl's ruling coalition meet here next Monday to formally name the Federal Constitutional Court president, Roman Herzog, as their joint candidate to succeed Richard von Weizsaecker as Germany's chief of state next summer.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roman Herzog of the Christian Democratic Union was elected Germany's seventh postwar president Monday at the end of a day of electoral-college voting that solidified the governing party's position in a key election year but discouraged Germans who believe they should be able to elect their leaders directly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1994
Re "Germany Asks for Poland's Forgiveness," Aug. 2: As a former Polish citizen and "a victim of the war," I would rather see German President Roman Herzog's apology accompanied by Germany's intense pursuit of still unpunished Nazi criminals and a forceful crackdown on the rise of neo-Nazis in Germany today. Perhaps then his plea "for forgiveness for what has been done to you by Germans" would have more credibility. IRVING FELD Encino
NEWS
April 28, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Germany's president expressed remorse for the 1937 bombing of Guernica, making his country's first atonement for what he called "the most terrible atrocities." Roman Herzog sent a message to survivors of the German bombing raid--immortalized in a painting by Pablo Picasso--one day after the 60th anniversary of the first air attack on an undefended town in history. German warplanes dropped 100,000 pounds of bombs on the civilians of the Spanish town, killing between 1,000 and 1,650 people.
NEWS
January 15, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The head of Germany's conservatives appointed an independent commission to investigate the financing scandal plaguing former Chancellor Helmut Kohl's party. Parliament also proceeded with its own inquiry into the allegedly illegal donations to the Christian Democratic Union, or CDU. The ruling Social Democratic Party has said it wants to question 26 CDU bosses and aides--including Kohl, whose 16-year rule ended in 1998.
NEWS
April 25, 1995
On Thursday, Israeli President Ezer Weizman will return to Bergen-Belsen, a German concentration camp he helped liberate as a British soldier 50 years ago, as part of the cycle of commemorations of pivotal end-of-the-war events in Germany this spring. Bergen-Belsen, famous as the camp where the young Dutch diary-writer Anne Frank died, was liberated by the British on April 15, 1945. Also attending the memorial will be German President Roman Herzog and about 500 camp survivors.
NEWS
May 23, 1994 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An electoral college of 1,324 legislators and "ordinary citizens" will elect Germany's next federal president today in the country's first such election since the unification of the East and West four years ago. Germany's seventh president will have the difficult task of filling the shoes of outgoing President Richard von Weizsaecker, a respected statesman who is the embodiment of how many Germans would like their country to be seen by the rest of the world.
NEWS
January 18, 1994
The largest two political parties in Chancellor Helmut Kohl's ruling coalition meet here next Monday to formally name the Federal Constitutional Court president, Roman Herzog, as their joint candidate to succeed Richard von Weizsaecker as Germany's chief of state next summer.
NEWS
June 28, 1994
Germany's first president elected since the unification of the former East and West in 1990 will be sworn in Friday. Roman Herzog of the Christian Democratic Union, viewed as a conservative intellectual, was chief justice of Germany's highest court until he was selected as president in May by an electoral college. He is replacing the popular Richard von Weizsaecker in the largely ceremonial post.
NEWS
February 7, 1995
In an unusual and somber twist to memories of war, the German city of Dresden, bombed into rubble and flames in the last months of World War II, will mark the 50th anniversary of the allied attack by inviting representatives of other war-damaged cities to attend ceremonies on Monday marking the assault. The city, not considered a prime war target, was nevertheless bombed on the night of Feb. 13, 1945, by British Lancasters and the next day by American B-17s.
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