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Roman Malinowski

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NEWS
August 15, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Premier Czeslaw Kiszczak of Poland, stalled in his efforts to put together a government, called Monday on President Wojciech Jaruzelski to appoint the head of the small United Peasants' Party in his place. Kiszczak appeared to stop short of submitting a formal resignation. He blamed Solidarity leader Lech Walesa for complicating and prolonging his effort to form a Cabinet.
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NEWS
August 16, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Expressing concern over "the deepening instability of Poland's political and economic situation," President Wojciech Jaruzelski called Tuesday for an urgent meeting of the country's key political forces to resolve a mounting crisis over the choice of a new government.
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NEWS
August 16, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Expressing concern over "the deepening instability of Poland's political and economic situation," President Wojciech Jaruzelski called Tuesday for an urgent meeting of the country's key political forces to resolve a mounting crisis over the choice of a new government.
NEWS
August 15, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Premier Czeslaw Kiszczak of Poland, stalled in his efforts to put together a government, called Monday on President Wojciech Jaruzelski to appoint the head of the small United Peasants' Party in his place. Kiszczak appeared to stop short of submitting a formal resignation. He blamed Solidarity leader Lech Walesa for complicating and prolonging his effort to form a Cabinet.
NEWS
August 14, 1989
Solidarity leader Lech Walesa will meet the leaders of two traditionally pro-Communist political parties today to discuss forming a non-Communist coalition government in Poland, his aides said. They said he will meet in Warsaw with Roman Malinowski, leader of the United Peasants' Party, and Jerzy Jozwiak, head of the Democratic Party.
NEWS
August 14, 1989 | From Reuters
Poland's Communist prime minister said today that he could not form a government and was handing the task to the leader of the United Peasants' Party, a small non-communist movement. Czeslaw Kiszczak, who has tried without success to form an administration since he was appointed Aug. 2, said in a statement that he was giving the task to Roman Malinowski, leader of the United Peasants' Party.
NEWS
August 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
Premier Czeslaw Kiszczak, whose efforts to form a Cabinet have been opposed by Solidarity, called Saturday for a meeting with Lech Walesa to discuss the standoff and the concerns it has raised in the Soviet Union. In an interview published by the official PAP news agency, Kiszczak said Poland "simply cannot afford a protracted impasse."
NEWS
August 15, 1989 | From Reuters
President Wojciech Jaruzelski called today for an urgent meeting to end Poland's political deadlock, and the Solidarity opposition said it was ready to form a government with Communist participation. Jaruzelski said he wanted all Poland's main political groups to meet as soon as possible and break the crisis that flared Monday when Prime Minister Czeslaw Kiszczak gave up his efforts to create a Communist-led administration.
NEWS
August 11, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
Representatives of Solidarity and the United Peasants' Party, the Communists' most important partner, met Thursday to explore the possibility of a Peasants-Solidarity alliance that could threaten the Communists' ability to form a government.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
The Polish Communist Party's two longtime parliamentary allies bolted their old coalition Wednesday and agreed to back a Solidarity-led government with Lech Walesa as premier. Solidarity lawmakers, with their new partners in the United Peasants' Party and Democratic Party looking on, endorsed a resolution Wednesday night calling for Walesa to be named premier at the head of what would be the first non-Communist government in the East Bloc.
NEWS
June 6, 1987 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
Relations between the United States and Poland, emerging from a five-year chill, are returning to normal as both sides prepare to name ambassadors and talks get under way on trade, cultural and scientific contacts, according to a visiting senior Polish official. An exchange of ambassadors, symbolizing a return to full diplomatic relations, should take place "fairly quickly," now that both sides have selected candidates, the official, Roman Malinowski, said in an interview.
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