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ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Sometimes you can't put your finger on what you've been missing until you encounter it again. After seeing two fine revivals of plays by Samuel Beckett and Harold Pinter - "Waiting for Godot" at the Mark Taper Forum and the British production of "The Caretaker" at San Francisco's Curran Theatre, respectively - I suddenly realized how ravenous I was for language in the theater with poetic density and grit. Beckett, 20th century playwriting's No. 1 game-changer, and Pinter, his most original disciple, were writers steeped in literature.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The Mozambican novelist and poet Mia Couto is the winner of the Neustadt International Prize for Literature, the biennial award that's often referred to as the “American Nobel.” “Mia Couto” is the nom de plume of the writer António Emílio Leite Couto, born in Mozambique in 1955. He published his first novel, "Terra Sonâmbula" (Sleepwalking Land) in 1992. The novel unfolds during Mozambique's 16 year civil war and uses “magic realism to turn its harsh reality into an exceptionally beautiful nightmare,”  the New York Times wrote in 2006 , when the novel was published in English by the British house Serpent's Tail.  Couto, 58, was the first African author to receive the Latin Union Award of Romance Languages and also won Brazil's prestigious Camões Prize for Literature in 2013.
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NEWS
June 8, 2006
For many there won't be a more ideal date concert all summer than Andrea Bocelli's show Sunday at the Hollywood Bowl. The Italian tenor isn't nearly as tied to the classical repertoire as those three other guys, and with his latest album, "Amore," he shows a better feel for pop-minded songs of romance (most sung in the romance languages) than a lot of operatic singers who awkwardly attempt to get down with "the people."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Sometimes you can't put your finger on what you've been missing until you encounter it again. After seeing two fine revivals of plays by Samuel Beckett and Harold Pinter - "Waiting for Godot" at the Mark Taper Forum and the British production of "The Caretaker" at San Francisco's Curran Theatre, respectively - I suddenly realized how ravenous I was for language in the theater with poetic density and grit. Beckett, 20th century playwriting's No. 1 game-changer, and Pinter, his most original disciple, were writers steeped in literature.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1986
Allen Saunders, a drama critic and linguist who created the "Steve Roper" comic strip in the late 1930s, has died in Maumee, Ohio, a spokeswoman for his syndicate said. The News America Syndicate in Irvine said Saunders, who also was a story line writer for "Mary Worth," died Tuesday at 86. He was a reporter and drama critic for the Toledo (Ohio) Blade who also taught romance languages at Wabash College. His first comic strip inspiration was "The Great Gusto," a spoof on blustery personalities.
OPINION
July 8, 2004
Although it is true that schools lack the resources they need to build their foreign language offerings ("Students Ask for More Foreign Language Classes," July 2), I believe that our multilingual, multicultural community can and should help us out in this respect. I have discovered that postsecondary programs, cultural institutes and fraternal organizations can provide the support needed. For example, Verdugo Hills High School offers three levels of Italian language. We owe the success of our program to our partnerships with the Fondazione Italia and the foreign language department of Cal State Northridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
The Mozambican novelist and poet Mia Couto is the winner of the Neustadt International Prize for Literature, the biennial award that's often referred to as the “American Nobel.” “Mia Couto” is the nom de plume of the writer António Emílio Leite Couto, born in Mozambique in 1955. He published his first novel, "Terra Sonâmbula" (Sleepwalking Land) in 1992. The novel unfolds during Mozambique's 16 year civil war and uses “magic realism to turn its harsh reality into an exceptionally beautiful nightmare,”  the New York Times wrote in 2006 , when the novel was published in English by the British house Serpent's Tail.  Couto, 58, was the first African author to receive the Latin Union Award of Romance Languages and also won Brazil's prestigious Camões Prize for Literature in 2013.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | ISAAC ASIMOV
When the Cro-Magnon men painted their colorful animals deep in the caves of present-day France and Spain 25,000 years ago, what language did they speak? Would you believe that there are scientists who are seriously trying to answer that question? How can one possibly find out? Ancient people may leave their bones behind, and their tools, and even their art, but they don't leave any record of their language.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2003 | Randy Lewis; Robert Hilburn
Josh Groban "Closer" (Reprise) ** 1/2 The young L.A. singer and his mentor, producer David Foster, struck a platinum vein two years ago with his 3.5-million-selling debut album, tapping an audience pretty much ignored by the music industry: fans of the heroic pop tenor.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1993 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Parlez-vous DNA? Habla Human Genome? Fluency in the Romance languages is great, but if you want to add some new life to your surroundings--literally--try uttering a few sentences in DNA. Of course, the idea that the double helix represents not just a scaffolding for biochemicals but a new kind of language has been around ever since Watson and Crick first discovered it 40 years ago. Biologists regularly talk of the genetic "code," gene "expression" and "editing" gene sequences.
NEWS
June 8, 2006
For many there won't be a more ideal date concert all summer than Andrea Bocelli's show Sunday at the Hollywood Bowl. The Italian tenor isn't nearly as tied to the classical repertoire as those three other guys, and with his latest album, "Amore," he shows a better feel for pop-minded songs of romance (most sung in the romance languages) than a lot of operatic singers who awkwardly attempt to get down with "the people."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2005 | Daniel Hernandez, Times Staff Writer
"KILLER Cronicas," Susana Chavez-Silverman's stirring memoir, is an audacious mix of English, Spanish and the hybrid some casually call Spanglish. "I looked at myself up and down en esos vegetable mirrors, bien sheepish, y me di cuenta that I was wearing red, fuzzy slippers! In Safeway!" the Pomona College professor writes, describing a frazzled moment early in the life of her rebellious toddler. "Pero there I was, in slippers.
OPINION
July 8, 2004
Although it is true that schools lack the resources they need to build their foreign language offerings ("Students Ask for More Foreign Language Classes," July 2), I believe that our multilingual, multicultural community can and should help us out in this respect. I have discovered that postsecondary programs, cultural institutes and fraternal organizations can provide the support needed. For example, Verdugo Hills High School offers three levels of Italian language. We owe the success of our program to our partnerships with the Fondazione Italia and the foreign language department of Cal State Northridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2003 | Randy Lewis; Robert Hilburn
Josh Groban "Closer" (Reprise) ** 1/2 The young L.A. singer and his mentor, producer David Foster, struck a platinum vein two years ago with his 3.5-million-selling debut album, tapping an audience pretty much ignored by the music industry: fans of the heroic pop tenor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2000 | AGUSTIN GURZA
As usual with most lovers in the city, they were troubled by the lack of that essential need of love--a meeting place. --Thomas Wolfe * Who says Americans aren't romantic? This graceful quote from our 20th century Southern novelist is pregnant with tantalizing hints of insight into intimacy. Don't ask where the line comes from, though. I found it on the opening page of a paperback guidebook, "The Best Places to Kiss in Southern California."
BUSINESS
April 22, 1993 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Parlez-vous DNA? Habla Human Genome? Fluency in the Romance languages is great, but if you want to add some new life to your surroundings--literally--try uttering a few sentences in DNA. Of course, the idea that the double helix represents not just a scaffolding for biochemicals but a new kind of language has been around ever since Watson and Crick first discovered it 40 years ago. Biologists regularly talk of the genetic "code," gene "expression" and "editing" gene sequences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2000 | AGUSTIN GURZA
As usual with most lovers in the city, they were troubled by the lack of that essential need of love--a meeting place. --Thomas Wolfe * Who says Americans aren't romantic? This graceful quote from our 20th century Southern novelist is pregnant with tantalizing hints of insight into intimacy. Don't ask where the line comes from, though. I found it on the opening page of a paperback guidebook, "The Best Places to Kiss in Southern California."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2005 | Daniel Hernandez, Times Staff Writer
"KILLER Cronicas," Susana Chavez-Silverman's stirring memoir, is an audacious mix of English, Spanish and the hybrid some casually call Spanglish. "I looked at myself up and down en esos vegetable mirrors, bien sheepish, y me di cuenta that I was wearing red, fuzzy slippers! In Safeway!" the Pomona College professor writes, describing a frazzled moment early in the life of her rebellious toddler. "Pero there I was, in slippers.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, Times Staff Writer
Yiddish has been dying a slow death for at least 50 years, but lovers of the Jewish language of Eastern European villages and East Coast immigrant slums still cling to the mame-loshn , their mother tongue, even in Southern California. They go to literary lectures, informal discussion groups, classes and songfests. Orthodox Jews sometimes debate the Talmud in Yiddish. Old people on bus benches in Jewish neighborhoods gossip in the language of their youth.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | ISAAC ASIMOV
When the Cro-Magnon men painted their colorful animals deep in the caves of present-day France and Spain 25,000 years ago, what language did they speak? Would you believe that there are scientists who are seriously trying to answer that question? How can one possibly find out? Ancient people may leave their bones behind, and their tools, and even their art, but they don't leave any record of their language.
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