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Romance Play

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Robert Abele
What would "The Pretty One" be without Zoe Kazan's pixieish melancholy and offbeat comic timing? Not much. In writer-director Jenée LaMarque's twee indie, Kazan does double duty, playing mousy rural Laurel, who lives with her parents, as well as sister Audrey, the popular one with the big city job and boyfriend (Ron Livingston). After a car accident kills Audrey and briefly gives Laurel amnesia, the wallflower takes advantage of the identity confusion and claims to be Audrey, adopting her sister's life as a kind of instant - albeit psychologically fraught - personality injection.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Robert Abele
What would "The Pretty One" be without Zoe Kazan's pixieish melancholy and offbeat comic timing? Not much. In writer-director Jenée LaMarque's twee indie, Kazan does double duty, playing mousy rural Laurel, who lives with her parents, as well as sister Audrey, the popular one with the big city job and boyfriend (Ron Livingston). After a car accident kills Audrey and briefly gives Laurel amnesia, the wallflower takes advantage of the identity confusion and claims to be Audrey, adopting her sister's life as a kind of instant - albeit psychologically fraught - personality injection.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Play's the Thing: Tania Myren-Zobel, 37, and William C. Sterritt, 39, are winners of South Coast Repertory's 1992 California Playwrights Competition. Myren-Zobel, an actress-turned-writer, won the top $5,000 prize for her play "Capoeira," about a woman caught up in an obsessive relationship with a bigamist.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1999 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
David Ives' "Ancient History" at the Fountain is a preciously slight piece about a failed romance. The play's director, Randee Trabitz, is perhaps best known for her recent staging of "The Mystery of Irma Vep," a comedic romp for two performers. "History" is also a two-character piece, and though Trabitz and her attractive performers clearly know their way around a comedy, they never quite skewer their material. Then again, Ives' play presents a teeny target.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Maybe it's because the situation has gone on for decades, maybe it's because internecine warfare is made for drama, but the fierce "troubles" in Northern Ireland have had so many cinematic representations the conflict's motto might well be "No justice, no peace, no end of movies." As a result, many of the key players in "The Boxer," the latest look at the agonies of Belfast, have been involved in at least one previous film set in the North.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time the heavy-handed "Solomon & Gaenor" is over, it has become such a punishing exercise in the self-evident that one is left numb and eager for escape. The precious few Welsh pictures that surface in the U.S. show a country gorgeous and populated by people of nobility and good humor. This is not one of those pictures. Although the countryside is as beautiful as ever, it is populated by people puritanical and narrow-minded in the extreme.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2000 | CHARLES SOLOMON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Japanese animated feature "X," opening today at the Nuart for a one-week run, is a convoluted apocalyptic fantasy centering on an unwilling hero who holds the fate of the planet in his hands. A mysterious entity, the Dragon of the Earth, threatens to destroy all human life: It can only be stopped by its counterpart, the Dragon of Heaven--with the aid of the teenage Kamui.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1989 | RAY LOYND
Aunt Pearl is laid out in a casket in the family living room, where occasionally one of the gathering mourners lifts the coffin lid with airy detachment and peers at her with curiosity and relief. It's a wonderful, droll touch, setting the comical tone for the West Coast premiere of Sandra Deer's "So Long on Lonely Street" at International City Theatre in Long Beach. Deer has ripened the hoary tradition of the reading-of-the-will drama with dripping Southern Gothic excess--in this case greed, incest and dark family secrets.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere in Nashville, there may well be a record promoter or marketing specialist who grimaces whenever K.D. Lang's voice filters through the air. The singing itself wouldn't be to blame for the sour look on the hypothetical country music insider's face. That would be impossible, since Lang possesses one of the most confident, presence-filled and unambiguously splendid voices in pop music today.
WORLD
August 14, 2007 | Jeffrey Fleishman, Times Staff Writer
Cairo The lovers and the fishermen, the street kids and the cops, the veiled girls and the flower sellers, they all come at dusk to the bridge over the Nile, stealing kisses and tugging their lines, escaping the heat and hoping for magic, the boys whispering promises bigger than their pockets as moonlit boats glide beneath them. Hotel lights glow along the corniche in the distance and somehow Cairo's grit and poverty are gone; night makes everything pure.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1998 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ah, progress. At the turn of the last century, when a middle-class father wanted to make sure his teenage son knew enough about sex, he took him aside and talked to him, however haltingly. Nowadays, of course, father and son could simply log on to the Internet, and avoid all that hemming and hawing. They do it the old-fashioned way in Eugene O'Neill's "Ah, Wilderness," set in 1906.
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