Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRomania Agriculture
IN THE NEWS

Romania Agriculture

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 29, 1988
Romanian President Nicolae Ceausescu reaffirmed his plan to destroy thousands of villages and resettle inhabitants in new towns, adding that some villages have already been transformed, the state news agency Agerpres reported. Speaking at the start of a three-day Communist Party Central Committee meeting in Bucharest, Ceausescu also ruled out the possibility of political pluralism.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The drive from Bucharest to the Black Sea coast is a three-hour ordeal of bumping over rutted roads choked with smoke-spewing trucks, horse-drawn carts and wayward livestock. Once there, Western sun seekers are treated to a low-cost vacation in hotels where the coffee machines are idle for want of filters, the bathroom tiles are crooked and crumbling, and bands of beggars and money-changers accost visitors at every corner.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Romanians lined up by the hundreds Thursday to buy meat and other foods that had been unavailable to the public for years as Romania's warehouses began sending produce to retail stores. Some children tasted oranges and bananas for the first time in their lives.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Romanians lined up by the hundreds Thursday to buy meat and other foods that had been unavailable to the public for years as Romania's warehouses began sending produce to retail stores. Some children tasted oranges and bananas for the first time in their lives.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The drive from Bucharest to the Black Sea coast is a three-hour ordeal of bumping over rutted roads choked with smoke-spewing trucks, horse-drawn carts and wayward livestock. Once there, Western sun seekers are treated to a low-cost vacation in hotels where the coffee machines are idle for want of filters, the bathroom tiles are crooked and crumbling, and bands of beggars and money-changers accost visitors at every corner.
NEWS
July 8, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexandru Livitchi, who has toiled in the bowels of Romania's Agriculture Ministry for 20 long years, expresses no fondness for Nicolae Ceausescu's ironfisted Communist regime. "Before the 1989 revolution," Livitchi, 54, says matter-of-factly, "we had only one right--the right to keep our mouths shut."
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vasile would like to crack down on his workers, who have slacked off since Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu was overthrown, but he doesn't dare. "If I punished them for not working hard, tomorrow they would ask me to leave," said Vasile, a chief engineer at the state-run Republica pipe factory. He gestured at an outdoor picnic table, where several workers sat smoking. Vasile's problem illustrates those of the newly elected government.
NEWS
December 26, 1989 | DAN FISHER and HARRY TRIMBORN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He basked as sycophants proclaimed him the "Genius of the Carpathians," but Nicolae Ceausescu will be remembered instead as the doddering tyrant whose incomprehensible belief that he could stay the same while all around him changed finally cost him his life. Even as he carefully crafted an image of independence from his neighbors in what used to be called the Soviet Bloc, the longtime Romanian leader built a family dynasty and ruthlessly insisted on unquestioning obedience from his own subjects.
NEWS
November 29, 1988
Romanian President Nicolae Ceausescu reaffirmed his plan to destroy thousands of villages and resettle inhabitants in new towns, adding that some villages have already been transformed, the state news agency Agerpres reported. Speaking at the start of a three-day Communist Party Central Committee meeting in Bucharest, Ceausescu also ruled out the possibility of political pluralism.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|