Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRomania Culture
IN THE NEWS

Romania Culture

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 25, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A neck-biting nobleman dispatched by 19th-Century literature to haunt this wind-swept outreach of Transylvania has stirred to life in the post-Communist era as the embodiment of a culture clash between patriotic Romanians and Hollywood. Romanians, only recently acquainted with the Western version of Dracula, are spurning the caped count of Irishman Bram Stoker's 1897 novel. That's because they fear the fictional vampire--and his celluloid successors--may taint the reputation of a real-life hero.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 9, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A feisty free press has been one of Romania's key accomplishments since the bloody 1989 overthrow of Communist leader Nicolae Ceausescu, who ran a secretive and brutal dictatorship. But old habits sometimes die hard in formerly Communist countries. Eliminating censorship here was relatively easy, but building a society and a government that respect the public's "right to know" is proving to be a bigger challenge.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 28, 1990 | Reuters
The country's bridge players, once feared by dictator Nicolae Ceausescu as a potential source of dissent among the elite, have come out of the closet after a six-year ban. Ceausescu and his wife, Elena, outlawed bridge, popular with the intelligentsia, and shut down clubs where the card game was played. "They were worried that when too many intelligent people got together, it could easily develop into something else," mathematician Mircea Mihu said.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1995 | SAM LOEWENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This country is really not so poor, said Simona Goncea-Botorog, marketing manager for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco International. It's partly a case of "bad advertising." While her assessment may be disputed by economists, not to mention Romanians, advertising is something Goncea-Botorog knows about. It was two years ago, while head of Rom-KU Advertising, that she negotiated the deal by which client RJR provided Bucharest with a year's free supply of bulbs for its traffic lights.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a 108-year-old building lacking hot water, flush toilets and a telephone, 234 young girls with shorn heads and ragged clothing spend their days embroidering napkins to sell to tourists. These are the survivors of a rigorous and deprived childhood, weathering starvation rations, heatless winters and years of neglect in Romania. The girls at Turnu Rosu are said to be mildly retarded, emotionally scarred by impersonal upbringing and a lifetime without human touch.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1995 | SAM LOEWENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This country is really not so poor, said Simona Goncea-Botorog, marketing manager for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco International. It's partly a case of "bad advertising." While her assessment may be disputed by economists, not to mention Romanians, advertising is something Goncea-Botorog knows about. It was two years ago, while head of Rom-KU Advertising, that she negotiated the deal by which client RJR provided Bucharest with a year's free supply of bulbs for its traffic lights.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a quiet, old-fashioned apartment in the mid-Wilshire district, the preacher who sparked the Romanian revolution is taking a break from catching history's treacherous waves. Laszlo Tokes, pale, tired-looking, dark-eyed, seems to fit perfectly with the red chintz chairs, dark furniture and portrait miniatures on the walls.
NEWS
June 9, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A feisty free press has been one of Romania's key accomplishments since the bloody 1989 overthrow of Communist leader Nicolae Ceausescu, who ran a secretive and brutal dictatorship. But old habits sometimes die hard in formerly Communist countries. Eliminating censorship here was relatively easy, but building a society and a government that respect the public's "right to know" is proving to be a bigger challenge.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On cold days, the heat is allowed to rise above 60 degrees in mental hospitals and orphanages, places that six months ago were frigid chambers of horror. Health officials have ordered an end to the crude ritual of injecting newborns with adult blood, a formerly common practice that spread the deadly AIDS virus to hundreds of infants.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | DAVID TUCKER, REUTERS
Democracy in Romania has brought death to its highways. Official statistics show that 1,380 people were killed on the roads between December, when Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu was swept from power, and the beginning of June. The figure is more than double the number killed in the same period last year. Police say many motorists no longer believe they have to obey the law. After years of unquestioning obedience to authority, traffic signs and patrolmen are frequently ignored.
NEWS
October 25, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A neck-biting nobleman dispatched by 19th-Century literature to haunt this wind-swept outreach of Transylvania has stirred to life in the post-Communist era as the embodiment of a culture clash between patriotic Romanians and Hollywood. Romanians, only recently acquainted with the Western version of Dracula, are spurning the caped count of Irishman Bram Stoker's 1897 novel. That's because they fear the fictional vampire--and his celluloid successors--may taint the reputation of a real-life hero.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a 108-year-old building lacking hot water, flush toilets and a telephone, 234 young girls with shorn heads and ragged clothing spend their days embroidering napkins to sell to tourists. These are the survivors of a rigorous and deprived childhood, weathering starvation rations, heatless winters and years of neglect in Romania. The girls at Turnu Rosu are said to be mildly retarded, emotionally scarred by impersonal upbringing and a lifetime without human touch.
NEWS
July 8, 1990 | DAVID TUCKER, REUTERS
Democracy in Romania has brought death to its highways. Official statistics show that 1,380 people were killed on the roads between December, when Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu was swept from power, and the beginning of June. The figure is more than double the number killed in the same period last year. Police say many motorists no longer believe they have to obey the law. After years of unquestioning obedience to authority, traffic signs and patrolmen are frequently ignored.
NEWS
May 28, 1990 | Reuters
The country's bridge players, once feared by dictator Nicolae Ceausescu as a potential source of dissent among the elite, have come out of the closet after a six-year ban. Ceausescu and his wife, Elena, outlawed bridge, popular with the intelligentsia, and shut down clubs where the card game was played. "They were worried that when too many intelligent people got together, it could easily develop into something else," mathematician Mircea Mihu said.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On cold days, the heat is allowed to rise above 60 degrees in mental hospitals and orphanages, places that six months ago were frigid chambers of horror. Health officials have ordered an end to the crude ritual of injecting newborns with adult blood, a formerly common practice that spread the deadly AIDS virus to hundreds of infants.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a quiet, old-fashioned apartment in the mid-Wilshire district, the preacher who sparked the Romanian revolution is taking a break from catching history's treacherous waves. Laszlo Tokes, pale, tired-looking, dark-eyed, seems to fit perfectly with the red chintz chairs, dark furniture and portrait miniatures on the walls.
NEWS
October 24, 2004 | Alison Mutler, Associated Press Writer
No parking spaces. Crippling traffic jams. Sky-high rents. Is this London, Rome or Athens? No, it's Bucharest, where communism and capitalism have conspired to make it Europe's most crowded capital. The crowding began when dictator Nicolae Ceausescu set out to industrialize Romania overnight by forcing peasants into factories and making them live in tiny apartments in the capital. The inflow continues today as rootless young people come seeking their fortune.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|