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NEWS
January 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Trials of Nicolae Ceausescu's eldest son and his Communist cronies are expected to begin this week, Romanian state television said Sunday. The TV showed Valentin Ceausescu, former Communist Party Secretary Emil Bobu, former Interior Minister Tudor Postelnicu, Marin Neagoe, who directed personal security for Ceausescu, and Dimitru Popescu, former director of the Sociopolitical Academy.
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NEWS
November 24, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iudit Diaconu is worried, angry and--like about half of her fellow Romanians--ready to throw out this country's reformist center-right government and vote former Communist Ion Iliescu back into power. "There's no honesty. There's no fairness in the economy," complained Diaconu, 72, who was waiting in a line outside the latest bank hit by panic withdrawals in a country buffeted for years by financial and economic disasters. "I'll vote for Iliescu. He's fair and honest."
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NEWS
July 8, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The walls of his small, sparsely furnished office are bare and dirty. One of the windows is broken. Florin Bonciu is too busy to notice. At just 31 years of age, the diminutive Bonciu has a mission--to pull Romania's economy out of the abyss--and to that end he is putting in 14-hour days, six and sometimes seven days a week.
NEWS
July 12, 1997 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their nation's bid to join the West's military alliance was thwarted by the United States this week, but on Friday the citizens of this long-suffering capital turned out for a massive, pro-American party that brought normal business to a halt. President Clinton, who insisted on excluding Romania from a select group of nearby countries invited to join NATO, offered an encouraging message to residents of Bucharest, a city of more than 2 million where horse-drawn carts remain part of the landscape.
NEWS
December 27, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his penultimate speech, Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu boasted that Soviet-style reform would come to his country "when apple trees grow pears." Historians may well record the phrase as the one that finally precipitated his fall. In the days that followed, theater and cinema students in Bucharest hung all the pears they could find on the barren December trees that lined the capital's main street.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Petre Roman named a new government Thursday and warned that Romania's fragile economy could collapse if firm measures are not taken to clamp down on excessive wage demands and falling productivity. Roman told Parliament that the drop in productivity in several industrial sectors is unjustified and intolerable and that pay increases granted despite falling output could "lead to an uncontrollable explosion of the economic mechanism."
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nicolae Ceausescu's monster was dying monstrously Friday. As his 24-year-old dictatorship in Romania careened into its final blood-soaked days, Nicolae Ceausescu, along with his wife Elena, his son and his network of family retainers, probably realized they could expect little mercy or sympathy from 23 million Romanians who have endured a despotism that, at the last, seemed to slip into outright madness. The end of power for the Ceausescu family came amid blood, flames and chaos.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The drive from Bucharest to the Black Sea coast is a three-hour ordeal of bumping over rutted roads choked with smoke-spewing trucks, horse-drawn carts and wayward livestock. Once there, Western sun seekers are treated to a low-cost vacation in hotels where the coffee machines are idle for want of filters, the bathroom tiles are crooked and crumbling, and bands of beggars and money-changers accost visitors at every corner.
NEWS
July 8, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ryszard Puchala is camping out in a mile-long line at the government-owned cement factory, waiting three days to buy raw materials for his construction business. It may not be worth the trouble. So sour is the economy of Poland's countryside that most of the local farmers cannot afford Puchala's services anyway. Times are tougher still at the other end of Eastern Europe, where Romania is trying desperately to inject Western investment into its foundering economy.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Thousands of Romanian demonstrators roamed the capital, blocked traffic and demanded the government's resignation in a third day of noisy protests against price rises. The demonstrations underlined the fragility of new elected governments in Eastern Europe's former Communist states as they try to switch from central planning to a market economy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1996
The ill-fated Giurgiu has been out of fuel, food and money but now the Romanian wreck of a ship once stranded for weeks in the Port of Los Angeles has become something of a high-seas pariah. The ship may be loaded with $3.5-million in fish meal, but it's running dry on luck: Hawaii won't even let it enter its harbor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1996 | JOHN COX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Corroding and stranded in the Port of Los Angeles, a Romanian cargo ship is being forced to stay in harbor until its dangerously decrepit condition is repaired. The Romanian vessel Giurgiu, on its way to China from Peru, came to terms with its unseaworthiness and limped out of the high seas and into port 10 days ago. Port officials say the Giurgiu is a ship of dangers that they will not allow to pull out of harbor.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tens of thousands of angry Romanian workers rallied nationwide to protest the government's painful economic reforms. The demonstrations were among the largest by workers since the overthrow of the Communist dictatorship in December, 1989. Protests have intensified in the two months since Prime Minister Nicolae Vacaroiu's government announced plans to amend reforms and end most remaining price subsidies May 1.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | Reuters
The government has ordered an across-the-board, three-month freeze on wholesale prices, the state news agency Rompres said Friday. Prices agreed to by suppliers and retailers up to the end of last month will be kept unchanged for 90 days and must be registered with the Finance Ministry by Tuesday, Rompres said, quoting Economy Minister Eugen Dijmarescu. The move is intended to restrain inflation now running at about 200%.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Romania announced a six-month freeze on the prices of staple foods and other essential goods and services after riots prompted by economic reforms and soaring inflation. The prices of bread, milk, edible oil, sugar, meat, public transport and state housing rents will remain unchanged until April 1 and possibly until July. The items are the sole survivors of price reforms that ended decades of Communist-style state subsidies.
NEWS
October 2, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striving to contain the damage after having sacrificed one reformist prime minister, Romanian President Ion Iliescu on Tuesday named free-market economist Teodor Stolojan to govern this turbulent nation, still deeply scarred by decades of repression.
NEWS
August 7, 1991 | From Reuters
Romanian Prime Minister Petre Roman received an emotional welcome in neighboring Soviet Moldova Tuesday and signed an agreement aimed at eventually integrating the rebel republic's economy with Bucharest. "This is more than an agreement. Now we must reach out and accomplish more together," Roman said on arrival for the first visit by a modern Romanian leader to Moldova, where ethnic Romanians make up 64% of the 4.3 million residents.
NEWS
September 27, 1991 | From Associated Press
Prime Minister Petre Roman resigned Thursday, bowing to violent protests against his economic reforms. But the move failed to stop chaotic demonstrations by thousands of enraged miners and other citizens, who demanded that Romania's president also step down. By nightfall, the protests threatened to blow up into a major confrontation between the ruling National Salvation Front, which took power two years ago, and angry workers in one of Europe's poorest countries.
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