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Romania Elections

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September 28, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still in the starting blocks of Eastern Europe's race to overcome communism, Romanians voted Sunday in an election that appeared destined to return hard-line President Ion Iliescu to power and set the stage for a new era of confrontation.
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NEWS
December 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
Final results showed President-elect Ion Iliescu soundly defeated an ultranationalist whose racist and extremist statements threatened to isolate Romania from mainstream Europe. Iliescu won 67% of Sunday's ballots to Corneliu Vadim Tudor's 33%, according to results published Tuesday by the central electoral bureau.
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NEWS
May 23, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ion Iliescu, former Communist Party stalwart who fell out with dictator Nicolae Ceausescu in the 1970s, emerged with a whopping 86% of the presidential vote after ballots were counted Tuesday from Romania's much-maligned attempt at a democratic election. The landslide victory for Iliescu and the National Salvation Front that he heads illustrates both the party's popularity and the risk it runs of restoring one-party rule in a nation that threw off communism in a bloody revolt five months ago.
NEWS
December 11, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Communist Ion Iliescu, who now stresses that he is a social democrat, won this country's presidency in a landslide Sunday over ultranationalist Corneliu Vadim Tudor, exit polls showed. The victory by Iliescu--who led Romania's 1989 revolution against the brutal Communist dictatorship of Nicolae Ceausescu, then served as president from 1990 to 1996--completes a sharp lurch to the left in Romanian politics.
NEWS
May 28, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the slow dance of post-Cold War NATO enlargement, Romania was one of the former Soviet bloc countries that most strongly desired to waltz right in. So when it was rejected for last year's first wave of expansion, many Romanians felt spurned. Then, right after Romania's disappointment of watching other former Communist states join the alliance first, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization launched airstrikes on Yugoslavia--and Romania was supposed to applaud. President Emil Constantinescu did.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fledgling political parties of Romania reacted favorably Friday to the arrangement reached with the National Salvation Front to share power in governing the country until national elections are held. The front, which has been running Romania since dictator Nicolae Ceausescu was overthrown Dec. 22, brought in 29 newly formed or re-established opposition parties to join a provisional Council of National Unity as the supreme body of state authority until the elections, now set for May 20.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
A united democratic opposition tested its strength to unseat remaining Communist officeholders as Romanians voted in local elections on Sunday. More than 140,000 candidates competed for 2,951 mayoral posts and almost 40,000 city and county council slots in the first free local elections in more than 50 years. Central Election Committee President Gheorghe Uglan said that about 65% of the 16.6 million registered voters had turned out by early evening. Results were not expected before today.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moderate center-right politicians suffered sweeping rejection by Romanian voters in elections Sunday, according to exit polls, with first-place finisher Ion Iliescu, a former Communist, headed for a presidential runoff against a hard-line ultranationalist. Iliescu's left-leaning Party of Social Democracy appeared on course to dominate the next Parliament and install the party's No.
NEWS
November 4, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Bulgarian opposition candidate Petar Stoyanov was the clear favorite over Socialist candidate Ivan Marazov as their countrymen chose a new president Sunday. The elections were seen as a gauge of the level of public anger with crime and economic woes. With 25% of the vote counted, the official BTA news agency said Stoyanov had 61.9% of the vote to 38.1% for Marazov. Official results are expected by Wednesday.
NEWS
November 5, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
With more than half the votes counted from elections in Yugoslavia, the leftist alliance uniting Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic's ruling Socialists with the neo-Communists led by his wife, Mirjana Markovic, had 48% of the total, or twice the percentage polled by the four-party opposition coalition. However, the opposition did dent Milosevic's hold on local posts.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moderate center-right politicians suffered sweeping rejection by Romanian voters in elections Sunday, according to exit polls, with first-place finisher Ion Iliescu, a former Communist, headed for a presidential runoff against a hard-line ultranationalist. Iliescu's left-leaning Party of Social Democracy appeared on course to dominate the next Parliament and install the party's No.
NEWS
November 24, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iudit Diaconu is worried, angry and--like about half of her fellow Romanians--ready to throw out this country's reformist center-right government and vote former Communist Ion Iliescu back into power. "There's no honesty. There's no fairness in the economy," complained Diaconu, 72, who was waiting in a line outside the latest bank hit by panic withdrawals in a country buffeted for years by financial and economic disasters. "I'll vote for Iliescu. He's fair and honest."
NEWS
May 28, 2000 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the slow dance of post-Cold War NATO enlargement, Romania was one of the former Soviet bloc countries that most strongly desired to waltz right in. So when it was rejected for last year's first wave of expansion, many Romanians felt spurned. Then, right after Romania's disappointment of watching other former Communist states join the alliance first, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization launched airstrikes on Yugoslavia--and Romania was supposed to applaud. President Emil Constantinescu did.
NEWS
November 19, 1996 | From Reuters
President-elect Emil Constantinescu pledged a new era of reforms Monday and won Western backing to guide his country toward the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the European Union after his historic defeat of ex-Communists. With 96% of the vote counted, Constantinescu, who turns 57 today, held a 54%-46% lead over President Ion Iliescu.
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | Associated Press
Romanians appeared Sunday to have opted for a new start, with exit polls suggesting they elected a newcomer to the presidency over the wily ex-Communist who led them through the first years of democracy. Results were not expected until this afternoon. But exit polls aired on private and state television just after voting ended at midnight suggested that Emil Constantinescu had defeated incumbent Ion Iliescu.
NEWS
November 5, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
With more than half the votes counted from elections in Yugoslavia, the leftist alliance uniting Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic's ruling Socialists with the neo-Communists led by his wife, Mirjana Markovic, had 48% of the total, or twice the percentage polled by the four-party opposition coalition. However, the opposition did dent Milosevic's hold on local posts.
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | Associated Press
Leaders of Romania's main political parties have agreed to hold parliamentary and presidential elections Sept. 27, President Ion Iliescu announced Wednesday. After meeting with party leaders in his Cotroceni Palace headquarters, Iliescu said they agreed that any further delay in the country's second post-Communist general elections "would cause a climate of uncertainty and tension."
NEWS
October 6, 1992
There is little question that Sunday's election runoff will award incumbent President Ion Iliescu, who made a strong showing in the first round, another four years as head of his economically teetering and politically tense Balkan state. What remains uncertain is the makeup of the governing alliance his party will need in view of a badly split parliamentary vote. Iliescu has called for a grand coalition to include the reform-minded Democratic Convention.
NEWS
November 4, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Bulgarian opposition candidate Petar Stoyanov was the clear favorite over Socialist candidate Ivan Marazov as their countrymen chose a new president Sunday. The elections were seen as a gauge of the level of public anger with crime and economic woes. With 25% of the vote counted, the official BTA news agency said Stoyanov had 61.9% of the vote to 38.1% for Marazov. Official results are expected by Wednesday.
NEWS
November 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Millions of flawed ballots were reprinted on the eve of presidential and parliamentary elections that could see the first change of power since Romanians overthrew communism in a bloody 1989 revolution. President Ion Iliescu, a former Communist who has led the impoverished Eastern European country since dictator Nicolae Ceausescu was executed, holds a thin lead in opinion polls released before today's national elections.
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