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NEWS
December 9, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bringing the Soviet Union's growing political differences with Cuba into full public view, Soviet Television in its main newscast Friday night reported that President Fidel Castro "had for the first time in public criticized reforms" under way here and in other socialist countries.
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NEWS
May 7, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hundreds of thousands of Romanians surged across the border with Soviet Moldavia on Sunday in what was intended as a ceremony of friendship but testified to a strong demand for unity among another of Europe's divided people. Eight border crossings were thrown open to Romanians without visas, allowing the first unhindered movement in 50 years between the divided halves of Moldavia. The scene was as joyful as the mingling of East and West Germans when the Berlin Wall was opened last Nov. 9.
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NEWS
October 6, 1988
Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev dressed down visiting Romanian President Nicolae Ceausescu, signaling the Kremlin's concern over maverick economic and political policies that have left Romania out of step with its Communist neighbors. In an unusually blunt luncheon address in Moscow, Gorbachev made it clear that he is disturbed by economic mismanagement and human rights violations in Romania.
NEWS
May 6, 1990 | BENJAMIN WEISER, THE WASHINGTON POST
For 10 years before deposed Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu's execution, the U.S. government secretly bought advanced Soviet military technology from Romania through Ceausescu's two brothers, who served in high government positions. As part of the clandestine intelligence program coordinated by the CIA, the U.S.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration denounced Romania as the last police state in Eastern Europe and vowed Tuesday to try to find a way to punish the regime for its bloody repression of anti-government demonstrators as reports of violence mounted. The Yugoslav news agency Tanjug cited reports, which it conceded were unconfirmed, that the death toll may have reached 2,000 in weekend clashes in western Romania near the Hungarian border.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secret police serving fallen dictator Nicolae Ceausescu were deeply suspicious of new Romanian leader Ion Iliescu and his connections with the Soviet Union months before the popular uprising that toppled the regime, according to interviews with former political prisoners here.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most striking feature of the new interim government of Romania, created amid the chaos of the bloody uprising last week, is that many of its leaders are the reform-minded sons of once-influential Communists who served the executed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, according to U.S. and academic specialists. Their program appears to be to make Romania into a West European-style social democracy.
NEWS
December 27, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a shift from 20 years of political detachment from the Soviet Union, a longtime ally of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was named Tuesday as provisional president of Romania. Romanian national television reported that Ion Iliescu, 59, a veteran Communist Party official considered by many to be "Gorbachev's man in Romania," will serve as "provisional president of the Provisional Council" of the country.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze spent Saturday meeting with Romania's new leaders and afterward said that he promised them the Soviet Union's "political, material and moral support." He said that talks on economic cooperation will begin "in the near future" and promised Romania increased shipments of oil and natural gas to help its 23 million citizens get through the winter with homes heated to near-normal levels for the first time in years.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A faction of the Romanian Communist Party on Sunday proposed holding a congress to consider the "self-dissolution" of the party and the turning over of its assets to the state. The announcement in the Romania Libera newspaper was described as "an initiative of a group within the party" that recognized that the Communists were "compromised" by the leadership of executed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. The group was not further identified.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze spent Saturday meeting with Romania's new leaders and afterward said that he promised them the Soviet Union's "political, material and moral support." He said that talks on economic cooperation will begin "in the near future" and promised Romania increased shipments of oil and natural gas to help its 23 million citizens get through the winter with homes heated to near-normal levels for the first time in years.
NEWS
January 1, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A faction of the Romanian Communist Party on Sunday proposed holding a congress to consider the "self-dissolution" of the party and the turning over of its assets to the state. The announcement in the Romania Libera newspaper was described as "an initiative of a group within the party" that recognized that the Communists were "compromised" by the leadership of executed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. The group was not further identified.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most striking feature of the new interim government of Romania, created amid the chaos of the bloody uprising last week, is that many of its leaders are the reform-minded sons of once-influential Communists who served the executed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, according to U.S. and academic specialists. Their program appears to be to make Romania into a West European-style social democracy.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After almost a week of silence, the White House seemed to dismiss as hypothetical Thursday a remarkable statement by Secretary of State James A. Baker III that offered support to the Soviet Union if it sent troops into Romania. "Baker was responding to a hypothetical situation that became more and more hypothetical thereafter," a White House spokesman said. "He (Baker) was not making a planned statement of policy."
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secret police serving fallen dictator Nicolae Ceausescu were deeply suspicious of new Romanian leader Ion Iliescu and his connections with the Soviet Union months before the popular uprising that toppled the regime, according to interviews with former political prisoners here.
NEWS
December 27, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a shift from 20 years of political detachment from the Soviet Union, a longtime ally of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was named Tuesday as provisional president of Romania. Romanian national television reported that Ion Iliescu, 59, a veteran Communist Party official considered by many to be "Gorbachev's man in Romania," will serve as "provisional president of the Provisional Council" of the country.
NEWS
December 27, 1989
'We would have preferred it if there had been a public trial,' said White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater, in remarking on the secret trial and executions of deposed Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife. The Soviets The Soviet Foreign Ministry called the executions an internal affair. Ministry spokesman Vadim Perfiliev said the decision 'has probably been made taking into account the aspirations and will of the Romanian people.'
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After almost a week of silence, the White House seemed to dismiss as hypothetical Thursday a remarkable statement by Secretary of State James A. Baker III that offered support to the Soviet Union if it sent troops into Romania. "Baker was responding to a hypothetical situation that became more and more hypothetical thereafter," a White House spokesman said. "He (Baker) was not making a planned statement of policy."
NEWS
December 27, 1989
'We would have preferred it if there had been a public trial,' said White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater, in remarking on the secret trial and executions of deposed Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife. The Soviets The Soviet Foreign Ministry called the executions an internal affair. Ministry spokesman Vadim Perfiliev said the decision 'has probably been made taking into account the aspirations and will of the Romanian people.'
NEWS
December 24, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union, affirming its support for the popular uprising that overthrew Romanian President Nicolae Ceausescu, pledged Saturday to provide "immediate and effective humanitarian aid" to the country but drew the line at military assistance. President Mikhail S.
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