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NEWS
December 23, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The health status of children adopted from Romania by American families reflects years of government-sanctioned neglect and abuse, placing them in a medically "high risk pediatric group," according to a study released Tuesday. Researchers studied 65 Romanian children now living in this country--children who came from among those considered the "most vital and attractive" available for adoption--and said that only 15% had been physically healthy and developmentally normal since their arrival.
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NEWS
December 23, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The health status of children adopted from Romania by American families reflects years of government-sanctioned neglect and abuse, placing them in a medically "high risk pediatric group," according to a study released Tuesday. Researchers studied 65 Romanian children now living in this country--children who came from among those considered the "most vital and attractive" available for adoption--and said that only 15% had been physically healthy and developmentally normal since their arrival.
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NEWS
May 25, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 4-year-old Morika, dying may prove to be the best part of her life. Just weeks ago, she was languishing in one of Romania's nightmarish orphanages, where the only attention accorded terminally ill children was a force-feeding so brutal that they grew terrified at the sight of a spoon. She had been abandoned as an infant by alcoholic parents, along with a twin sister and an older brother. All three children were later found to have AIDS.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 4-year-old Morika, dying may prove to be the best part of her life. Just weeks ago, she was languishing in one of Romania's nightmarish orphanages, where the only attention accorded terminally ill children was a force-feeding so brutal that they grew terrified at the sight of a spoon. She had been abandoned as an infant by alcoholic parents, along with a twin sister and an older brother. All three children were later found to have AIDS.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
This country is in the throes of the first known epidemic of childhood AIDS caused by contaminated blood and the constant reuse of needles, a humanitarian organization says. Dr. Jacques Lebas, president of the Paris-based Doctors of the World, Monday urged the international health community to provide Romania with disposable needles and blood-screening equipment.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
The World Health Organization is planning a new campaign to fight AIDS in Eastern European countries, which only recently began reporting cases of the deadly disease, officials said Friday. Dr. Jonathan Mann, head of the U.N. agency's AIDS program, said East Bloc countries form the "new frontiers of the global epidemic" that has claimed hundreds of thousands of victims, primarily in the Americas, Africa and West Europe.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | Associated Press
Nearly 1 million abortions were performed in Romania in 1990, the year after a ban was lifted following the ouster of Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, health experts say. That amounted to three abortions for every birth, the officials said. Speaking at a conference on sex education, the Romanian health experts said Saturday that the government will try to reduce the number of abortions by sharply raising fees and by introducing sex education in schools.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On cold days, the heat is allowed to rise above 60 degrees in mental hospitals and orphanages, places that six months ago were frigid chambers of horror. Health officials have ordered an end to the crude ritual of injecting newborns with adult blood, a formerly common practice that spread the deadly AIDS virus to hundreds of infants.
SPORTS
October 12, 2011 | Wire reports
The NBA and its locked-out players are going to use the same federal mediator who tried to resolve the NFL's labor dispute months before it eventually ended. George Cohen , director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, said Wednesday that he will oversee negotiations between the NBA and the NBA Players Assn. Those meetings are scheduled to begin Tuesday in New York. Cohen said he has been in contact with representatives of both sides "for a number of months.
OPINION
March 21, 1999 | Douglas Starr, Douglas Starr, co-director of Boston University's program in science journalism, is author of "BLOOD: An Epic History of Medicine and Commerce."
The trial and acquittal in France of three former ministers for manslaughter in the "tainted blood" AIDS scandal seem to represent the depths of cynicism. The officials, including a former prime minister, were accused of favoring French business interests over the lives of French citizens. They allegedly did so by delaying, for several months, the use of a U.S. blood test for HIV while a French company prepared its own test for the marketplace.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | Associated Press
Nearly 1 million abortions were performed in Romania in 1990, the year after a ban was lifted following the ouster of Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, health experts say. That amounted to three abortions for every birth, the officials said. Speaking at a conference on sex education, the Romanian health experts said Saturday that the government will try to reduce the number of abortions by sharply raising fees and by introducing sex education in schools.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On cold days, the heat is allowed to rise above 60 degrees in mental hospitals and orphanages, places that six months ago were frigid chambers of horror. Health officials have ordered an end to the crude ritual of injecting newborns with adult blood, a formerly common practice that spread the deadly AIDS virus to hundreds of infants.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
The World Health Organization is planning a new campaign to fight AIDS in Eastern European countries, which only recently began reporting cases of the deadly disease, officials said Friday. Dr. Jonathan Mann, head of the U.N. agency's AIDS program, said East Bloc countries form the "new frontiers of the global epidemic" that has claimed hundreds of thousands of victims, primarily in the Americas, Africa and West Europe.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
This country is in the throes of the first known epidemic of childhood AIDS caused by contaminated blood and the constant reuse of needles, a humanitarian organization says. Dr. Jacques Lebas, president of the Paris-based Doctors of the World, Monday urged the international health community to provide Romania with disposable needles and blood-screening equipment.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why does an apple fall when it is ripe? Is it brought down by the force of gravity? Is it because its stalk withers? Because it is dried by the sun, because it grows too heavy, or the wind shakes it, or because the boy standing under the tree wants to eat it? --Tolstoy, "War and Peace" You could see these men in the evening in certain cafes in Bratislava or Bydgoszc, Krakow or Kecskemet, Leipzig or Poznan, at the end of a hard day's door-holding for the Communist Party.
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