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NEWS
October 25, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A neck-biting nobleman dispatched by 19th-Century literature to haunt this wind-swept outreach of Transylvania has stirred to life in the post-Communist era as the embodiment of a culture clash between patriotic Romanians and Hollywood. Romanians, only recently acquainted with the Western version of Dracula, are spurning the caped count of Irishman Bram Stoker's 1897 novel. That's because they fear the fictional vampire--and his celluloid successors--may taint the reputation of a real-life hero.
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NEWS
October 25, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A neck-biting nobleman dispatched by 19th-Century literature to haunt this wind-swept outreach of Transylvania has stirred to life in the post-Communist era as the embodiment of a culture clash between patriotic Romanians and Hollywood. Romanians, only recently acquainted with the Western version of Dracula, are spurning the caped count of Irishman Bram Stoker's 1897 novel. That's because they fear the fictional vampire--and his celluloid successors--may taint the reputation of a real-life hero.
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OPINION
March 27, 2008 | A. Wess Mitchell, A. Wess Mitchell is director of research at the Washington-based Center for European Policy Analysis.
At next week's NATO summit in Bucharest, Romania, history will be made when an American president, cowboy hat in hand, literally begs Europe for help in Afghanistan. For weeks, high-ranking U.S. officials have traversed the "old" continent, beseeching its capitals for anything in lace-up boots and camouflage. Spare a tank, Germany? How about a mothballed helicopter, Italy? Say no, U.S.
SPORTS
December 2, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci was on a tour of the United States in 1981, the two men who had the most impact on her career, her coach, Bela Karolyi, and her choreographer, Geza Pozsar, defected. They said this week that they had considered asking Comaneci, who was 19 at the time, to join them, but decided against it--not because they feared that she would reject them, but because they feared that she would accept.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Warsaw Pact's last Stalinist domino, the tyrannical regime of Romanian President Nicolae Ceausescu, toppled with a violent crash Friday after several days of Europe's bloodiest fighting since the end of World War II. A newly formed Council of the Front of National Salvation, composed mostly of known Romanian dissidents and the army's chief of staff, announced on Radio Bucharest shortly before midnight that it had taken over until free elections can be held next April.
NEWS
November 1, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a paneled office high above the whining lathes and deafening compressors of the Moldova Mechanical Enterprise, Director Gigi Tiplea oscillates nervously in his swivel chair and narrows his eyes with suspicion. He is discomfited by questions about the shrinking staff and flagging output of the cavernous workshops that sprawl across hundreds of acres, a dehumanizing monument to Eastern Europe's Communist-era obsession with development on a Gargantuan scale.
TRAVEL
April 16, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If not for the concrete utility poles that lean beside every road and byway, a visitor to Bukovina might be forgiven for suspecting that the last few centuries never happened. Horse-drawn carts are the chief mode of transportation on the narrow, winding roads of hard-packed gravel. Peasants plod their fields in hand-stitched boots, fashioned from the skins of slaughtered livestock.
SPORTS
May 25, 1994 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a rainy-misty morning in late spring and at the Stadio Comunale a mongrel puppy is racing around the soccer field where Brescia's second division team is practicing. The players are halfheartedly stretching on the grass, and--grateful for the diversion--allow the puppy to clamber over them with his muddy paws. The brown and black dog, Rocky, belongs to someone who works at the stadium and the players accept him as a mascot, boxing his ears and playfully tugging his wagging tail.
NEWS
May 5, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A light spring breeze blows out at least three matches before Eugenia Stanciu succeeds in lighting a candle and fixing it to the sooty brick atop the grave of Nicolae Ceausescu. She lays a handful of red tulips onto a pile of wilted floral tributes and stands back to pay her respects to the conducator , the fuehrer , the man once known to 23 million Romanians as the "Genius of the Carpathians." "He was our master.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2003 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
A scream echoes through the old house on the hill in Transylvania. A man in a black cape flies down the stairs. Outside a storm threatens. But even in Dracula's hometown, evil is not what it used to be. The man in black is Hans Bruno Frolich, a Lutheran priest. The shriek comes from his young daughter, playing upstairs in the parish house. And a few cobblestone streets away at the Club Dracula Internet Cafe, the only thing diabolical is the price of a drink.
NEWS
March 9, 1988 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
The rendezvous must be in a public place and yet one that offers some security, a place where a conversation can be held but where, the woman hopes, the cushions of the upholstery or the scrollwork of the table conceal no listening devices. This choice, of course, is not easy.
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