Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRomania Labor
IN THE NEWS

Romania Labor

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last two years, the city of Brasov has had a certain fame as the one place in this oppressed country where people spoke out, however briefly and unsuccessfully, against the rule of Nicolae Ceausescu. In November, 1987, as another hard Transylvanian winter descended on the Carpathian Mountains, workers at the Red Flag Truck Factory here went on strike. About 5,000 marched from the factory gates to the center of the city to make their demands: bread, heat and light.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Romanian police crushed a violent protest by thousands of angry coal miners and arrested their leader, Miron Cozma, in clashes that left at least one miner dead and 100 injured. About 2,000 miners were headed to the capital, Bucharest, to protest a high court ruling that sentenced Cozma in absentia to 18 years in jail for leading coal miners in anti-reform riots in 1991. The clash lasted three hours, with about 1,000 police fighting back with tear-gas grenades, rubber bullets and batons.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Petre Roman named a new government Thursday and warned that Romania's fragile economy could collapse if firm measures are not taken to clamp down on excessive wage demands and falling productivity. Roman told Parliament that the drop in productivity in several industrial sectors is unjustified and intolerable and that pay increases granted despite falling output could "lead to an uncontrollable explosion of the economic mechanism."
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers have begun replacing shattered window glass, and a steady autumn rain is washing away soot from firebombs lobbed against the granite facade of government headquarters on Victory Square. But the terror unleashed during three days of rioting by angry miners last week has inflicted psychological and political damage that Romanians will find much more difficult to repair.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | From United Press International
Tens of thousands of factory workers rallied around the National Salvation Front on Monday, chanting "We will work and back you up" in a demonstration outside the provisional government's headquarters. The demonstrators crowded Bucharest's Victory Square in a counterpoint to earlier protests by opposition parties calling for the resignation of the front. Members of the National Peasants Party and the Liberal Party fled their headquarters as thousands of people later marched on their buildings.
NEWS
November 22, 1987
Romanian factory workers killed two policemen in a rampage on Nov. 15 through Brasov, and the city is now occupied by government troops, the West German newspaper Bild am Sonntag said. It said up to 20,000 workers from three factories rioted after Communist authorities tried to force them to vote in a local election. Some workers stormed the Brasov City Hall and slit the throat of one police guard and beat another to death, the paper said.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | Reuters
This nation's biggest trade union has renewed a threat to call for a general strike if the ruling National Salvation Front fails to meet its demands. The National Confederative Union said in a statement published Tuesday in the Romania Libera newspaper that it would call its 3 million members out on strike Thursday unless demands for pay raises, better working conditions and a revision of market-economy reforms are met.
NEWS
February 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Romanian police crushed a violent protest by thousands of angry coal miners and arrested their leader, Miron Cozma, in clashes that left at least one miner dead and 100 injured. About 2,000 miners were headed to the capital, Bucharest, to protest a high court ruling that sentenced Cozma in absentia to 18 years in jail for leading coal miners in anti-reform riots in 1991. The clash lasted three hours, with about 1,000 police fighting back with tear-gas grenades, rubber bullets and batons.
NEWS
October 5, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers have begun replacing shattered window glass, and a steady autumn rain is washing away soot from firebombs lobbed against the granite facade of government headquarters on Victory Square. But the terror unleashed during three days of rioting by angry miners last week has inflicted psychological and political damage that Romanians will find much more difficult to repair.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Romanian government announced Monday that it has abolished the death penalty, disbanded Nicolae Ceausescu's hated secret police, the Securitate, and will introduce a five-day workweek. A week after Ceausescu, 71, and his wife, Elena, were executed by a military firing squad, the revocation of the death penalty and other steps were made public by interim President Ion Iliescu in a New Year's television address. "The two executions will be the last to be carried out," he said.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | Reuters
This nation's biggest trade union has renewed a threat to call for a general strike if the ruling National Salvation Front fails to meet its demands. The National Confederative Union said in a statement published Tuesday in the Romania Libera newspaper that it would call its 3 million members out on strike Thursday unless demands for pay raises, better working conditions and a revision of market-economy reforms are met.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | From Reuters
Prime Minister Petre Roman named a new government Thursday and warned that Romania's fragile economy could collapse if firm measures are not taken to clamp down on excessive wage demands and falling productivity. Roman told Parliament that the drop in productivity in several industrial sectors is unjustified and intolerable and that pay increases granted despite falling output could "lead to an uncontrollable explosion of the economic mechanism."
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | From United Press International
Tens of thousands of factory workers rallied around the National Salvation Front on Monday, chanting "We will work and back you up" in a demonstration outside the provisional government's headquarters. The demonstrators crowded Bucharest's Victory Square in a counterpoint to earlier protests by opposition parties calling for the resignation of the front. Members of the National Peasants Party and the Liberal Party fled their headquarters as thousands of people later marched on their buildings.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last two years, the city of Brasov has had a certain fame as the one place in this oppressed country where people spoke out, however briefly and unsuccessfully, against the rule of Nicolae Ceausescu. In November, 1987, as another hard Transylvanian winter descended on the Carpathian Mountains, workers at the Red Flag Truck Factory here went on strike. About 5,000 marched from the factory gates to the center of the city to make their demands: bread, heat and light.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Romanian government announced Monday that it has abolished the death penalty, disbanded Nicolae Ceausescu's hated secret police, the Securitate, and will introduce a five-day workweek. A week after Ceausescu, 71, and his wife, Elena, were executed by a military firing squad, the revocation of the death penalty and other steps were made public by interim President Ion Iliescu in a New Year's television address. "The two executions will be the last to be carried out," he said.
NEWS
November 22, 1987
Romanian factory workers killed two policemen in a rampage on Nov. 15 through Brasov, and the city is now occupied by government troops, the West German newspaper Bild am Sonntag said. It said up to 20,000 workers from three factories rioted after Communist authorities tried to force them to vote in a local election. Some workers stormed the Brasov City Hall and slit the throat of one police guard and beat another to death, the paper said.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vasile would like to crack down on his workers, who have slacked off since Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu was overthrown, but he doesn't dare. "If I punished them for not working hard, tomorrow they would ask me to leave," said Vasile, a chief engineer at the state-run Republica pipe factory. He gestured at an outdoor picnic table, where several workers sat smoking. Vasile's problem illustrates those of the newly elected government.
BOOKS
April 3, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN
A quiet recluse in Southern France, Graham Greene, 83, has written a new novel, "The Captain and the Enemy." The book is scheduled for September publication from Viking, Greene's publisher from 1938 until 1970, when he moved to Simon & Schuster. The new book, the author explains in a preface he calls an "apologia," has a long and curious history. Greene began the book in 1974 but put it aside.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|