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August 16, 1990 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carol Mardock's list of contacts grows, almost by the day. A new name at the U.S. Department of State. A name at the U.S. Embassy in Romania. A name at a Romanian church in Orange County. A name of another international adoption agency. A name of another adoption attorney. But somehow the list is never long enough, and the contacts--thus far--never powerful enough.
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NEWS
October 15, 1994 | From Reuters
A British couple were in shock after they were sentenced Friday to two years and four months in jail by a Bucharest court for buying a baby and trying to smuggle her out of Romania in a box. "They are not too good. They are in a state of shock," defense lawyer Ioana Floca said after consulting her clients, Bernadette and Adrian Mooney.
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NEWS
February 7, 1990 | Reuters
More than 180,000 Romanians have taken advantage of new travel freedoms to obtain passports since dictator Nicolae Ceausescu was ousted in December, the official news agency Rompres said Tuesday. Under Ceausescu, who was executed Dec. 25, ordinary Romanians were barred from traveling abroad, but the National Salvation Front, which seized power after his fall, abolished the restrictions.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Romania's provisional prime minister, Petre Roman, said Monday that some of the demonstrators who forced their way into government offices in Bucharest on Sunday and briefly held captive the country's vice premier were "suspicious persons, ex-convicts, people without jobs, loaded with money and armed with knives."
NEWS
October 15, 1994 | From Reuters
A British couple were in shock after they were sentenced Friday to two years and four months in jail by a Bucharest court for buying a baby and trying to smuggle her out of Romania in a box. "They are not too good. They are in a state of shock," defense lawyer Ioana Floca said after consulting her clients, Bernadette and Adrian Mooney.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The provisional government of Romania on Wednesday warned secret- police snipers still holding out in Romanian cities to surrender by nightfall today or face death by firing squad if they are captured. But after five days of skirmishes between the army and bands of secret police left over from the regime of executed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, Bucharest and other major cities were mostly quiet.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a 108-year-old building lacking hot water, flush toilets and a telephone, 234 young girls with shorn heads and ragged clothing spend their days embroidering napkins to sell to tourists. These are the survivors of a rigorous and deprived childhood, weathering starvation rations, heatless winters and years of neglect in Romania. The girls at Turnu Rosu are said to be mildly retarded, emotionally scarred by impersonal upbringing and a lifetime without human touch.
NEWS
November 28, 1985 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
Towering near the center of this old Balkan capital is a triumphal arch, illuminated by floodlights at night, with an inscription in tall letters hailing President Nicolae Ceausescu's 20 years in power as a "golden age" for Romania. But the streets of Bucharest--a city of 2 million people--tell a different story these days, one of gloom and hardship, of nearly universal shortages and fear of the coming winter.
NEWS
December 10, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a 108-year-old building lacking hot water, flush toilets and a telephone, 234 young girls with shorn heads and ragged clothing spend their days embroidering napkins to sell to tourists. These are the survivors of a rigorous and deprived childhood, weathering starvation rations, heatless winters and years of neglect in Romania. The girls at Turnu Rosu are said to be mildly retarded, emotionally scarred by impersonal upbringing and a lifetime without human touch.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | SUSAN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carol Mardock's list of contacts grows, almost by the day. A new name at the U.S. Department of State. A name at the U.S. Embassy in Romania. A name at a Romanian church in Orange County. A name of another international adoption agency. A name of another adoption attorney. But somehow the list is never long enough, and the contacts--thus far--never powerful enough.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Romania's provisional prime minister, Petre Roman, said Monday that some of the demonstrators who forced their way into government offices in Bucharest on Sunday and briefly held captive the country's vice premier were "suspicious persons, ex-convicts, people without jobs, loaded with money and armed with knives."
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | Reuters
More than 180,000 Romanians have taken advantage of new travel freedoms to obtain passports since dictator Nicolae Ceausescu was ousted in December, the official news agency Rompres said Tuesday. Under Ceausescu, who was executed Dec. 25, ordinary Romanians were barred from traveling abroad, but the National Salvation Front, which seized power after his fall, abolished the restrictions.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The provisional government of Romania on Wednesday warned secret- police snipers still holding out in Romanian cities to surrender by nightfall today or face death by firing squad if they are captured. But after five days of skirmishes between the army and bands of secret police left over from the regime of executed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, Bucharest and other major cities were mostly quiet.
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