Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRomania Revolts
IN THE NEWS

Romania Revolts

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
December 30, 1989
Former Olympic gymnast Nadia Comaneci said her defection just weeks before Romania's Communist government crumbled had so embarrassed leader Nicolae Ceausescu that he ordered her hunted down and brought back. Comaneci, 28, who surprised the world when she fled Romania, said she hopes to visit her homeland after its crisis ends. Ceausescu, the last of the ironclad Stalinist leaders in the Warsaw Pact countries, was executed with his wife Monday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Romanian Communists said they will seek approval to exhume the remains of Stalinist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu because they suspect that he might have been tortured before he was executed in 1989. "We plan to ask authorities to allow us to exhume Ceausescu and his wife to bury them in a Christian way," said Cristian Niculae of the Romanian Workers Party.
Advertisement
SPORTS
April 14, 1990 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From every revolution blossom legendary moments. Paul Revere's ride. Marie Antoinette's beheading. A lone Chinese man blocking the path of a Red Army tank in Tien An Men Square. Situations are magnified when performed in the theater of change. But sometimes, in this chaotic environment, circumstances become muddled and legends exaggerated. Last December, the world was entranced by an unfolding drama on the streets of Bucharest, Romania.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1992 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
No one knows how many artworks have been damaged or lost in Central and Eastern Europe during the turmoil in the last few years, but estimates run into the thousands. At least one tale has a happy ending, however, as we see in "Innocent Bystander," a didactic exhibition that is attracting crowds at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The captivating show (to Feb.
NEWS
December 30, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three levels below the basement of the Romanian Communist Party's Central Committee building, there is a bunker built strong enough to withstand a nuclear attack. One room of its command center contains a wall of Japanese- and American-made equipment. It has now been shot to pieces, its wiring and circuitry ripped loose. This was where Nicolae Ceausescu's Praetorian Guard, the fanatical presidential protection unit of the Securitate, was prepared to make its last stand in defense of its leader.
NEWS
December 23, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nicolae Ceausescu's monster was dying monstrously Friday. As his 24-year-old dictatorship in Romania careened into its final blood-soaked days, Nicolae Ceausescu, along with his wife Elena, his son and his network of family retainers, probably realized they could expect little mercy or sympathy from 23 million Romanians who have endured a despotism that, at the last, seemed to slip into outright madness. The end of power for the Ceausescu family came amid blood, flames and chaos.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Revolutionary soldiers found a vast labyrinth of safehouses and tunnels used by police forces loyal to Nicolae Ceausescu, some with entries hidden in cemetery burial vaults and subway systems. Army officers speaking on Bucharest radio Sunday said that the sprawling maze of tunnels criss-cross the city and link two airports, Communist Party headquarters and Ceausescu's palace in downtown Bucharest.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | From Reuters
Four top aides of former Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu have confessed they are guilty of complicity to commit genocide, a lawyer told a military court Saturday. Former Deputy Prime Minister Ion Dinca, former Interior Minister Tudor Postelnicu, Communist Party organizational chief Emil Bobu and former Vice President Manea Manescu are the first senior Ceausescu regime officials to go on trial.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is sending $750,000 in medical supplies and other assistance to Romania, the White House said Wednesday. The announcement was made after President Bush arrived in this south Texas city on the Gulf of Mexico to start a six-day fishing and hunting vacation. Speaking with reporters at the Corpus Christi Naval Air Station, Bush said he is "just amazed and respectful of that change that has taken place" in Romania.
SPORTS
January 14, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a bright sun streaming in on the warm breakfast room, slicing though dark clouds outside, talk of cruelty and torture and revolution seemed far removed. The three Romanian athletes were laughing at their ability to laugh, to find humor and hope in their experiences during their country's violent 11-day revolution that ended a day after Christmas.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Police used trucks and tear gas to clear University Square of about 800 anti-government demonstrators as club-wielding coal miners left the city, returning calm to Bucharest for the first time since Wednesday. President Ion Iliescu continued consultations on a successor to Prime Minister Petre Roman, who was forced to resign because of the violence. Meanwhile, a funeral was held for one of three people known to have died in the riots.
NEWS
March 26, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
A military court Monday sentenced 16 former Communist officials to prison for supporting a bloody crackdown that preceded the December, 1989, overthrow of dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. Five of the 21 defendants, all members of the Communist Party's Politburo, were acquitted. The five-member panel of military judges gave the harshest sentences--5 1/2 years each--to Ceausescu's propaganda chief, Dumitru Popescu, 62, and Ioan Totu, 59, a former foreign minister.
NEWS
December 31, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1989 Laszlo Tokes was lifted from obscurity to history. The hand of fate was active again this year, but the consequences were crueler--personally and politically. Two brothers of the Reformed Church pastor and revolutionary were the targets of apparent assassination attempts.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angered by skyrocketing prices and perpetual shortages, nearly 200,000 Romanians marched Thursday to demand a second revolution in the most serious outbreak of anti-government sentiment since last December's uprising. The demonstrations in Bucharest, Timisoara, Brasov and other large cities were organized to protest a Nov.
NEWS
September 22, 1990 | From Associated Press
A military tribunal on Friday sentenced Nicu Ceausescu, the youngest son of the former Romanian dictator, to a 20-year prison term for his actions during the revolution that toppled his father. In its unanimous sentence, the five-member panel of judges dropped the original charge of complicity in genocide and instead found the 39-year-old Ceausescu guilty of "instigation to murder."
NEWS
August 25, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The trial of Nicu Ceausescu, son of the late Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, ended with the panel of judges saying the verdict on the genocide charges would be pronounced Sept. 21. Ceausescu, former Communist Party boss in Sibiu, is accused of ordering troops to shoot demonstrators in that city last December during the uprising in which his father and mother were overthrown and executed.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last two years, the city of Brasov has had a certain fame as the one place in this oppressed country where people spoke out, however briefly and unsuccessfully, against the rule of Nicolae Ceausescu. In November, 1987, as another hard Transylvanian winter descended on the Carpathian Mountains, workers at the Red Flag Truck Factory here went on strike. About 5,000 marched from the factory gates to the center of the city to make their demands: bread, heat and light.
NEWS
December 27, 1989 | From Reuters
Dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife, Elena, went to their deaths by firing squad defiantly spurning the right of their military accusers to judge them. "I will be judged only by the people," Ceausescu repeatedly told the military prosecutor in a videotaped Romanian television broadcast late Tuesday. The television did not show the couple's faces when their death sentence was pronounced, but Ceausescu was heard clearly to say: "It doesn't matter. It has no importance."
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | Reuters
Laszlo Toekes, 38, the ethnic Hungarian priest whose arrest helped spark Romania's revolution last December, has undergone successful pelvic surgery in Hungary after a car crash, Hungarian newspapers reported Friday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|