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NEWS
August 1, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The patriarch of Romania's Orthodox church, Justin Moisescu,has died at age 76. The official Romanian news agency Agerpres Thursdaydid not give the date or cause of his death. Moisescu was made patriarch in June, 1977, after the death of Patriarch Justinian. In Romania, as in other Soviet bloc countries, church leaders must declare allegiance to the communist state in order to be approved by the government.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2007
Patriarch Teoctist, 92, the head of the Romanian Orthodox Church, who made history when he invited then-Pope John Paul II to his country in 1999 but also was criticized for being too close to former communists, died Monday of a heart attack after prostate surgery at a Bucharest hospital. Teoctist was appointed to head the church in November 1986 but briefly stepped down in 1989 after anti-communist protesters said he had been too conciliatory toward former dictator Nicolae Ceausescu.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1988
The Los Angeles City Council's Planning and Environment Committee approved construction Tuesday of a $2.5-million Romanian Orthodox church complex in rural Shadow Hills after church officials agreed to a list of demands by surrounding residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2000 | RAUL GALLEGOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Marian Petrescu vividly remembers the day he was asked to become a spy. It was one evening late in 1988 at the office of a well-known military officer in the Romanian city of Timisoara. The officer told Petrescu, then a young Orthodox priest, that he would have to listen intently to his parishioners' confessions, take notes, then report those who opposed the Communist government of Nicolae Ceausescu. In exchange, he would receive money and a bigger church. Petrescu refused and went home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1988
Los Angeles City Council members on Tuesday approved construction of a Romanian Orthodox church in Shadow Hills, despite objections from neighbors that it would mar the rural landscape and disrupt their equestrian life style. The 14-0 vote gave the Holy Trinity Romanian Orthodox Church permission to build a 300-seat Byzantine-style sanctuary and a 500-person social hall at 9801 Wentworth St., just southeast of the Hansen Dam Recreation Area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2007
Patriarch Teoctist, 92, the head of the Romanian Orthodox Church, who made history when he invited then-Pope John Paul II to his country in 1999 but also was criticized for being too close to former communists, died Monday of a heart attack after prostate surgery at a Bucharest hospital. Teoctist was appointed to head the church in November 1986 but briefly stepped down in 1989 after anti-communist protesters said he had been too conciliatory toward former dictator Nicolae Ceausescu.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1988 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Times Staff Writer
Despite heated opposition from about 40 homeowners, the Los Angeles Board of Zoning Appeals on Tuesday cleared the way for a $2.5-million Romanian Orthodox church complex to be built in rural Shadow Hills. The appeals board voted 3 to 1 to overturn a zoning administrator's decision last December to deny a permit for the Holy Trinity Romanian Orthodox Church to build the 5,000-square-foot Byzantine-style complex on eight acres of hilly property at 10500 Wentworth St.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1990 | From Religious News Service
Highly placed officials of the World Council of Churches and the Romanian Orthodox Church have acknowledged that neither body raised a strong enough voice of protest against the suffering imposed under the regime of deposed Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. The Rev. Emilio Castro, general secretary of the World Council of Churches, said: "I think we didn't speak strongly enough, that is clear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2000 | RAUL GALLEGOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Marian Petrescu vividly remembers the day he was asked to become a spy. It was one evening late in 1988 at the office of a well-known military officer in the Romanian city of Timisoara. The officer told Petrescu, then a young Orthodox priest, that he would have to listen intently to his parishioners' confessions, take notes, then report those who opposed the Communist government of Nicolae Ceausescu. In exchange, he would receive money and a bigger church. Petrescu refused and went home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1988 | MARCIA DUNN, Associated Press
Her family jewels are gone and her castle is Communist property, but Romania's Princess Ileana has found peace in a monastery here in rural Pennsylvania. The 79-year-old princess, known as the Rev. Mother Alexandra, is one of 12 nuns who share food, work and prayers in the Romanian Orthodox cloister. She was the founder of the Orthodox Monastery of the Transfiguration, the first English-speaking Orthodox monastery in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1990 | From Religious News Service
Highly placed officials of the World Council of Churches and the Romanian Orthodox Church have acknowledged that neither body raised a strong enough voice of protest against the suffering imposed under the regime of deposed Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. The Rev. Emilio Castro, general secretary of the World Council of Churches, said: "I think we didn't speak strongly enough, that is clear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1988
Los Angeles City Council members on Tuesday approved construction of a Romanian Orthodox church in Shadow Hills, despite objections from neighbors that it would mar the rural landscape and disrupt their equestrian life style. The 14-0 vote gave the Holy Trinity Romanian Orthodox Church permission to build a 300-seat Byzantine-style sanctuary and a 500-person social hall at 9801 Wentworth St., just southeast of the Hansen Dam Recreation Area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1988
The Los Angeles City Council's Planning and Environment Committee approved construction Tuesday of a $2.5-million Romanian Orthodox church complex in rural Shadow Hills after church officials agreed to a list of demands by surrounding residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1988 | MARCIA DUNN, Associated Press
Her family jewels are gone and her castle is Communist property, but Romania's Princess Ileana has found peace in a monastery here in rural Pennsylvania. The 79-year-old princess, known as the Rev. Mother Alexandra, is one of 12 nuns who share food, work and prayers in the Romanian Orthodox cloister. She was the founder of the Orthodox Monastery of the Transfiguration, the first English-speaking Orthodox monastery in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1988 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Times Staff Writer
Despite heated opposition from about 40 homeowners, the Los Angeles Board of Zoning Appeals on Tuesday cleared the way for a $2.5-million Romanian Orthodox church complex to be built in rural Shadow Hills. The appeals board voted 3 to 1 to overturn a zoning administrator's decision last December to deny a permit for the Holy Trinity Romanian Orthodox Church to build the 5,000-square-foot Byzantine-style complex on eight acres of hilly property at 10500 Wentworth St.
NEWS
August 1, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
The patriarch of Romania's Orthodox church, Justin Moisescu,has died at age 76. The official Romanian news agency Agerpres Thursdaydid not give the date or cause of his death. Moisescu was made patriarch in June, 1977, after the death of Patriarch Justinian. In Romania, as in other Soviet bloc countries, church leaders must declare allegiance to the communist state in order to be approved by the government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1998 | Religion News Service
Romania could become the first predominantly Orthodox country to receive a visit from Pope John Paul II, according to Orthodox officials in Bucharest. A statement released July 24 by the Romanian Orthodox Church's synod said it "proved receptive" to a possible papal visit. It said "unofficial consultations" between representatives of the Romanian church and the Vatican about a visit will begin this fall.
NEWS
June 24, 1992 | Times Wire Services
Virgil Gheorghiu, the Orthodox bishop whose international bestseller, "The 25th Hour," described the horrors of peasant life in Romania, died Monday at age 75, family friends said. Gheorghiu, who denounced Nazism and communism in his book, had been ill for two years. The cause of death was not given. Gheorghiu wrote more than 60 novels. The most successful was "The 25th Hour" in 1949, which was translated into 35 languages.
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