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Romano Prodi

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NEWS
October 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro formally asked former Communist Massimo D'Alema to form Italy's 56th government since World War II. The request came after D'Alema said he had assembled a parliamentary majority in days of hard bargaining with centrist and leftist parties. The Vatican's newspaper was sharply critical of Scalfaro for tapping a former Communist as Italy's next premier, succeeding Romano Prodi.
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WORLD
November 14, 2011 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
Eager to win back the confidence of financial markets, Italy's president on Sunday appointed economist Mario Monti to lead the country's new government. The move came almost 24 hours after Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi submitted his resignation amid widespread celebration on the streets of Rome. President Giorgio Napolitano's announcement sets the stage for Monti, a former European Union commissioner, to form a new technocratic government that will try to navigate Italy out of the debt crisis with austerity measures sought by the European Union.
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WORLD
April 13, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A confident Romano Prodi insisted that his center-left coalition's Italian election victory was on solid ground, even as Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi called the vote fraudulent and demanded a recount. But Berlusconi later appeared to back away from his allegation of fraud, releasing a statement late in the evening in which he said the very thin margin of victory "requires a scrupulous check to ascertain any possible error or irregularity."
WORLD
January 25, 2008 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Twenty months after it came to power, the Italian government fell late Thursday when Prime Minister Romano Prodi lost a vote of confidence in Parliament and was forced to resign. The demise of Prodi's center-left coalition caps weeks of bitter political fighting but sends Italy into a new period of uncertainty while either an interim government is installed or fresh elections are called. Prodi had spent much of his time in office simply trying to survive politically.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
Five days after Italy's Communists brought down the government, Romano Prodi regained his job as prime minister Tuesday after the hard-liners made peace to keep the country on course for a single European currency. President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro formally reinstalled Prodi as prime minister and told him to inform Parliament that his government again had a majority. It was not clear whether Prodi would ask for a vote of confidence, but with Communist support he had the votes to win it.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | From Associated Press
A small Communist party whose leader reveres Cuban President Fidel Castro and courted Mexican guerrillas on Thursday brought down Italy's 55th postwar government. Prime Minister Romano Prodi resigned after his allies in the Communist Refoundation Party refused to tolerate welfare cuts the government says are vital for Italy's entry into the common European currency.
NEWS
March 25, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
European Union leaders Wednesday nominated former Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi to preside over the scandal-plagued European Commission, tackling the only quickly resolvable task at a summit riven by financial disputes and overshadowed by NATO's bombing of Yugoslavia.
WORLD
April 30, 2004 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
During his history-making and eyebrow-raising visit here this week, Libyan leader Col. Moammar Kadafi called Romano Prodi, the president of the European Commission, "my brother." But the bespectacled Italian professor who brought Kadafi to the capital of Europe couldn't be less like the Libyan dictator.
WORLD
January 25, 2008 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Twenty months after it came to power, the Italian government fell late Thursday when Prime Minister Romano Prodi lost a vote of confidence in Parliament and was forced to resign. The demise of Prodi's center-left coalition caps weeks of bitter political fighting but sends Italy into a new period of uncertainty while either an interim government is installed or fresh elections are called. Prodi had spent much of his time in office simply trying to survive politically.
WORLD
February 25, 2007 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Romano Prodi, forced to resign last week as Italy's prime minister, will try to reassemble his government in a bid to rescue the nation from crippling political chaos, officials said Saturday. Ending intense negotiations, Italian President Giorgio Napolitano asked Prodi to put together a new administration, which must then prove it has majority support by winning confidence votes in both houses of Parliament.
WORLD
February 25, 2007 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
Romano Prodi, forced to resign last week as Italy's prime minister, will try to reassemble his government in a bid to rescue the nation from crippling political chaos, officials said Saturday. Ending intense negotiations, Italian President Giorgio Napolitano asked Prodi to put together a new administration, which must then prove it has majority support by winning confidence votes in both houses of Parliament.
WORLD
April 20, 2006 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
One by one, the doors were shutting Wednesday on Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's campaign to resist defeat in national elections. Italy's highest court, ruling on a partial recount of ballots cast 10 days ago, confirmed that the center-left coalition led by economist Romano Prodi defeated Berlusconi's conservative alliance by a tiny margin. "The election is finally over," Prodi said during a news conference at his headquarters in Rome's historic center.
WORLD
April 13, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
A confident Romano Prodi insisted that his center-left coalition's Italian election victory was on solid ground, even as Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi called the vote fraudulent and demanded a recount. But Berlusconi later appeared to back away from his allegation of fraud, releasing a statement late in the evening in which he said the very thin margin of victory "requires a scrupulous check to ascertain any possible error or irregularity."
WORLD
April 30, 2004 | Sebastian Rotella, Times Staff Writer
During his history-making and eyebrow-raising visit here this week, Libyan leader Col. Moammar Kadafi called Romano Prodi, the president of the European Commission, "my brother." But the bespectacled Italian professor who brought Kadafi to the capital of Europe couldn't be less like the Libyan dictator.
NEWS
March 25, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
European Union leaders Wednesday nominated former Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi to preside over the scandal-plagued European Commission, tackling the only quickly resolvable task at a summit riven by financial disputes and overshadowed by NATO's bombing of Yugoslavia.
NEWS
October 20, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro formally asked former Communist Massimo D'Alema to form Italy's 56th government since World War II. The request came after D'Alema said he had assembled a parliamentary majority in days of hard bargaining with centrist and leftist parties. The Vatican's newspaper was sharply critical of Scalfaro for tapping a former Communist as Italy's next premier, succeeding Romano Prodi.
WORLD
April 20, 2006 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
One by one, the doors were shutting Wednesday on Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi's campaign to resist defeat in national elections. Italy's highest court, ruling on a partial recount of ballots cast 10 days ago, confirmed that the center-left coalition led by economist Romano Prodi defeated Berlusconi's conservative alliance by a tiny margin. "The election is finally over," Prodi said during a news conference at his headquarters in Rome's historic center.
WORLD
November 14, 2011 | By Don Lee, Los Angeles Times
Eager to win back the confidence of financial markets, Italy's president on Sunday appointed economist Mario Monti to lead the country's new government. The move came almost 24 hours after Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi submitted his resignation amid widespread celebration on the streets of Rome. President Giorgio Napolitano's announcement sets the stage for Monti, a former European Union commissioner, to form a new technocratic government that will try to navigate Italy out of the debt crisis with austerity measures sought by the European Union.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | From Associated Press
Five days after Italy's Communists brought down the government, Romano Prodi regained his job as prime minister Tuesday after the hard-liners made peace to keep the country on course for a single European currency. President Oscar Luigi Scalfaro formally reinstalled Prodi as prime minister and told him to inform Parliament that his government again had a majority. It was not clear whether Prodi would ask for a vote of confidence, but with Communist support he had the votes to win it.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | From Associated Press
A small Communist party whose leader reveres Cuban President Fidel Castro and courted Mexican guerrillas on Thursday brought down Italy's 55th postwar government. Prime Minister Romano Prodi resigned after his allies in the Communist Refoundation Party refused to tolerate welfare cuts the government says are vital for Italy's entry into the common European currency.
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