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October 16, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
The World Cup is less than eight months away, but the name-calling continues with Brazilian congressman and former national team star Romario launching another attack against FIFA, world soccer's governing body, and its president, Sepp Blatter. According to the Associated Press, Romario spoke at a congressional hearing Tuesday and called Blatter a thief and labeled his assistant, FIFA secretary general Jerome Valcke, "a blackmailer. " Romario, who has long been critical of both FIFA and the Brazilian organizers of next summer's tournament, continued his attacks online, writing on his website Wednesday that Valcke was not "the best person to do business" with Brazil and calling the Brazilian soccer federation "corrupt.
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SPORTS
October 16, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
The World Cup is less than eight months away, but the name-calling continues with Brazilian congressman and former national team star Romario launching another attack against FIFA, world soccer's governing body, and its president, Sepp Blatter. According to the Associated Press, Romario spoke at a congressional hearing Tuesday and called Blatter a thief and labeled his assistant, FIFA secretary general Jerome Valcke, "a blackmailer. " Romario, who has long been critical of both FIFA and the Brazilian organizers of next summer's tournament, continued his attacks online, writing on his website Wednesday that Valcke was not "the best person to do business" with Brazil and calling the Brazilian soccer federation "corrupt.
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SPORTS
July 13, 1994 | MIKE DOWNEY
Brazilians have come to Nutwood. Hundreds of them. It is the name of the street in Fullerton where the fun-loving soccer players of Brazil are being lodged, directly across the street from Texas Loosey's chili parlor, where the women employees wear cowboy hats and bathing suits.
SPORTS
June 28, 2009 | Grahame L. Jones
There were Romario and Bebeto and their "rocking the baby" goal celebrations for Brazil en route to winning the 1994 World Cup final at the Rose Bowl. American soccer fans remember them. There were Ronaldinho and Ronaldo, the one with the goofy grin and the other with his strange half-moon haircut, leading Brazil to victory in the 2002 World Cup final in Yokohama, Japan. American fans remember them.
SPORTS
July 2, 1994 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The forward is poised in front of a Brazilian flag, set to strike a ball that appears as if it will explode through the page of the magazine. The words with the advertisement read: "The mood of a country usually swings with the economy. The mood of Brazil swings with Bebeto's right foot."
SPORTS
July 13, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Watch them when they score. Watch their faces. Everyone else stares in wonderment at the sky or into the stands, the better to understand his achievement and remember his glory. Not these guys. They close their eyes. They need look at nothing, because they have seen it all before. They require no understanding, as if they have known their task since birth. They are heroes. This is their time. Roberto Baggio of Italy. Hristo Stoitchkov of Bulgaria. Romario of Brazil.
SPORTS
July 8, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Brazilian journalists said Thursday that Romario, one of the team's star forwards, declared the Netherlands team is not as competitive or spirited as the U.S. team, which it defeated in the second round, 1-0. Dutch Coach Dick Advocaat and his players, who will face Brazil in a quarterfinal Saturday at Dallas, had varied reactions when Romario's sentiments were relayed to them. Advocaat saw the statement as a ploy to get the Dutch to doubt themselves.
SPORTS
July 6, 1994 | FERNANDO CALAZANS, O Globo of Rio de Janeiro
"Why did Brazil win and why did it deserve to win? Because it has Romario and because it has Bebeto, nothing else. They are the only ones on this team who play football. The others play soccer --like the Americans."
SPORTS
July 13, 1994 | MIKE DOWNEY
Brazil is big on baby talk. Star forward Bebeto says teammates did a cradle-rocking motion with their arms to celebrate goals in their quarterfinal victory over the Netherlands in honor of his new son, Mattheus, born last Thursday. Bebeto says he also dedicated a goal to teammate Leonardo, who also has a new son, Lucas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1994 | TAMMY HYUNJOO KRESTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of soccer fans chanting "Brazil, ole, ole, ola!" swarmed to Niketown on Thursday to cheer half a dozen members of the Brazilian soccer team, flush from a victory that sent it into the World Cup final round, as they went on a shopping spree. But the cheers quickly turned to jeers with an announcement by Niketown representatives that the fans' favorite player, Romario, would rather go shopping inside the store than sign autographs for the fans outside.
SPORTS
November 11, 2004 | Paul Gutierrez, Times Staff Writer
A sense of nostalgia, and Technicolor, enveloped the Coliseum on Wednesday night.
SPORTS
December 31, 2002 | Paul Gutierrez, Times Staff Writer
While World Cup titleholder Brazil is set to end its championship year without a coach, an icon from the team's past is holding out hope of playing again for the champions. Romario, who turns 37 next month, has missed out on the last two World Cups and last two Olympic games. Not that he's bitter. "I don't let it get to me anymore," Romario told Reuters. "Whatever comes along from now will be a bonus."
SPORTS
May 7, 2002 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brazil Coach Luiz Felipe Scolari ignored intense public pressure, including some advice from President Fernando Henrique Cardoso, and left 1994 World Cup winner Romario off the 23-player roster he named Monday for Korea/Japan '02. The decision to omit the 36-year-old Vasco Da Gama striker is likely to cause a furor that will abate only if Brazil wins the World Cup. Otherwise, Scolari probably will pay with his job. Romario has been the top goal scorer in Brazil for the last two seasons.
SPORTS
March 4, 2001 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No one will ever mistake Clint Mathis for Romario. Or vice versa, for that matter. But by the time both players walked off the field at the Rose Bowl on Saturday afternoon after Brazil's 2-1 victory over the U.S. in front of 45,387, neither player's expression matched the outcome. Romario, whose team had won the exhibition, was a little downcast. Mathis, whose team had lost, was upbeat. The reason was simple.
SPORTS
March 3, 2001 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Romario de Souza Faria owns a bar in Rio de Janeiro. There's nothing unusual about that. Lots of sporting figures invest in business enterprises. It's how this particular establishment is decorated that earns it a mention here. Romario, it seems, is partial to having artists paint the restroom doors with caricatures of those whose path he crosses.
SPORTS
February 16, 1998 | GRAHAME L. JONES
If the USA-Mexico match was the main attraction Sunday, the third-place game between Brazil and Jamaica was the animated cartoon that preceded it. Or at least it would have been had the teams not been tired out from playing four games in little more than a week. As a result, the play was disjointed and only occasionally produced moments of true excitement at the Coliseum.
SPORTS
June 28, 2009 | Grahame L. Jones
There were Romario and Bebeto and their "rocking the baby" goal celebrations for Brazil en route to winning the 1994 World Cup final at the Rose Bowl. American soccer fans remember them. There were Ronaldinho and Ronaldo, the one with the goofy grin and the other with his strange half-moon haircut, leading Brazil to victory in the 2002 World Cup final in Yokohama, Japan. American fans remember them.
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As in all epochal battles, mythical or otherwise, there has to be a hero and there has to be a villain. But which is which? That's the difficulty facing neutral observers of today's World Cup final between Italy and Brazil at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena. For the first time in history, two three-time winners of the planet's most coveted sports trophy are squaring off in the championship match. But which team should you support? Do you take Italy, which won the World Cup in 1934, 1938 and 1982, because of its courage in the face of adversity?
SPORTS
July 16, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT
Brazilian forward Romario has already declared Sunday's final a personal goal-scoring competition between himself and Italian forward Roberto Baggio. There's no denying the two players, despite their different nationalities, are similarly charismatic. "They are two unpredictable players that make the difference all of a sudden, out of the ordinary," Brazilian Coach Carlos Alberto Parreira said. "They are both skilled technically. They are both killers."
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