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TRAVEL
June 22, 2003 | Rossella Brina, Special to The Times
WE were vacationing in Italy -- with Rome, Florence and Venice at our fingertips -- so why did we spend a week sitting on a beach? Basically, because I knew my children, Christopher and Francesca, would embrace the idea. At 8 and 6, what's not to love in a place with an unlimited supply of water and sand? But my husband, Scott, had been hesitant. It was easy to understand why: At the top of his wish list was Rome, a city he had never visited.
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TRAVEL
June 22, 2003 | Rossella Brina, Special to The Times
WE were vacationing in Italy -- with Rome, Florence and Venice at our fingertips -- so why did we spend a week sitting on a beach? Basically, because I knew my children, Christopher and Francesca, would embrace the idea. At 8 and 6, what's not to love in a place with an unlimited supply of water and sand? But my husband, Scott, had been hesitant. It was easy to understand why: At the top of his wish list was Rome, a city he had never visited.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard and Christie D'Zurilla
The hot priests calendar. In Rome, that's what they call the Calendario Romano. Its pages are filled with good-looking young men in clerical garb, posing for the camera. Yes, they're actual priests, photographer Piero Pazzi told the Los Angeles Times, or "seminarians or accoliti . " (See the gallery, above.) Roman news outlet the Local says tourists can be seen at gift stands near the Vatican eyeballing the calendar, then snapping it up . PHOTOS: Meet the Nice Jewish Guys Pazzi told the Los Angeles Times that the calendar , which he's put out since 2003, consists of portraits of men he photographed in the streets of Rome and Seville, Spain.
TRAVEL
July 13, 1986 | AL GOLDFARB, Goldfarb is a Los Angeles free-lance writer.
Devoid of cars and long lines of summer tourists, Tivoli provides a sharp contrast to a visit to nearby Rome. History buffs will turn back the pages of the past in this enchanting little town. Only 20 miles east of the Eternal City, Tivoli is a one-time playground of wealthy Romans and emperors. The town sits like a jewel in the Apennine foothills, featuring the impressive Villa d'Este with its dancing fountains that have enchanted visitors since the 16th Century.
TRAVEL
October 31, 2010 | By Susan Spano, Special to the Los Angeles Times
After living in Rome for almost three years, I moved back to the U.S. at the beginning of the summer. I packed up my apartment, gave my books to friends and left my potted plants for the next tenant. Now someone else is standing at the window overlooking Via Baccina, its west end butted against the Roman Forum, its east end opening onto the little Piazza della Madonna dei Monti. The florist on Via dei Serpenti is teaching someone else the Italian words for "daisy" and "lily," and the woman who sleeps on the stoop next door is getting spare change from another pocketbook.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1998
Imagine a planned community with miles and miles of roads, an elaborate water system and a diverse population. The citizens enjoyed theater and sporting events in large arenas and there was much political intrigue in the capital, which was Rome. The ancient Romans were master architects, artists and soldiers whose empire at one time spanned half of Europe and almost all of the Middle East.
BOOKS
December 8, 1996 | Michael Dorris, Michael Dorris is the author of many books, including "Sees Through Trees" (Hyperion)
Sometimes sweet, sometimes not a bit, life is ever a mystery. We negotiate its dim and winding paths equipped only with the flickering candles of our senses, unwinding the string of our experiences, making choices out of instinct or wish or fear but never knowing with any certainty where the next step may lead. To allay the terror of this profound unknowing, most of us--if we don't attempt to close our minds to it altogether--opt for ways to share the burden of our confusion.
FOOD
May 14, 1992 | FAITH WILLINGER, Willinger is the author of "Eating in Italy."
The city of Rome measures its history in centuries--and food, of course, has played a fundamental role in Rome's history. Cookbooks have chronicled the city's foods and wines ever since extravagant millionaire/gastronomer Apicius set his sumptuous First-Century table with nightingale's tongues, camel's heels and the liver of a goose force-fed on figs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2003 | Nicolai Ouroussoff, Times Staff Writer
Few cities are as complacent about their architectural legacy as Rome. For decades, while other European capitals like Paris and Berlin continued to probe the edges of contemporary culture, Romans have mostly been content to contemplate the depth of their existing legacy, from the brute force of the Colosseum to the perfection of Michelangelo's dome. So it may be a surprise to learn that Rome is regaining its creative momentum.
NEWS
December 30, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Never before has the end come so quickly. It began as the Russian Empire of the czars, who centuries ago proclaimed Muscovy as history's "Third Rome." It later became the Soviet Empire, heralded by Lenin and Stalin as the logical extension of history's vanguard. On Christmas Day, it simply ceased to exist. Historically, empires tend to linger for decades, sometimes centuries, past their prime. Consider the Romans, who were expelled from their capital by barbarian invaders in the year 410.
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