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March 2, 1993 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born a peasant, Felice Feretti matured into a severe and haughty prelate with piercing eyes, a long white beard and farsighted urban vision. He became an arrogant and imperious man, "related to the devil," some claimed. He also became, at age 65, one of history's most dynamic Popes. As Pope Sixtus V, he left an indelible stamp on Rome in a frenetic five-year reign from 1585-90, transforming his capital from a medieval hodgepodge into a Baroque showplace.
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May 10, 2000 | JULIAN CATALANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the age of 12, upon finding his bathwater insufficiently heated, Commodus, son and heir of Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius, ordered the servant responsible to be thrown into the furnace. At 19, according to historian and Commodus contemporary Dion Cassius, Commodus became the head of state by having his saintly father poisoned. According to director Ridley Scott's film "Gladiator," Commodus, played by Joaquin Phoenix, asphyxiated his father.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1991 | From the Washington Post
Tough decisions about printing X-rated pictures don't often confront Hershel Shanks, the editor of Biblical Archaeology Review. The magazine typically publishes articles of archeological import illustrated by pictures of ancient ruins, potsherds and dusty digs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1995
Q: How did the ancients calculate with Roman numerals? A: They didn't, according to USC mathematician Solomon W. Golomb. The Romans had Greek household slaves or retainers who did all their calculating for them using a Greek numeric system. That system was not unlike the currently used arabic system, except that there was no symbol for zero. Multiplication was easy in this system, Golomb said, but "long division was something to be avoided at all costs."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1995
Q: How did the ancients calculate with Roman numerals? A: They didn't, according to USC mathematician Solomon W. Golomb. The Romans had Greek household slaves or retainers who did all their calculating for them using a Greek numeric system. That system was not unlike the currently used arabic system, except that there was no symbol for zero. Multiplication was easy in this system, Golomb said, but "long division was something to be avoided at all costs."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2000 | JULIAN CATALANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At the age of 12, upon finding his bathwater insufficiently heated, Commodus, son and heir of Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius, ordered the servant responsible to be thrown into the furnace. At 19, according to historian and Commodus contemporary Dion Cassius, Commodus became the head of state by having his saintly father poisoned. According to director Ridley Scott's film "Gladiator," Commodus, played by Joaquin Phoenix, asphyxiated his father.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1993 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born a peasant, Felice Feretti matured into a severe and haughty prelate with piercing eyes, a long white beard and farsighted urban vision. He became an arrogant and imperious man, "related to the devil," some claimed. He also became, at age 65, one of history's most dynamic Popes. As Pope Sixtus V, he left an indelible stamp on Rome in a frenetic five-year reign from 1585-90, transforming his capital from a medieval hodgepodge into a Baroque showplace.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1991 | From the Washington Post
Tough decisions about printing X-rated pictures don't often confront Hershel Shanks, the editor of Biblical Archaeology Review. The magazine typically publishes articles of archeological import illustrated by pictures of ancient ruins, potsherds and dusty digs.
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