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Romeo Dallaire

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2005 | Nancy Ramsey, Special to The Times
LAST summer found audiences flocking to documentaries such as "Fahrenheit 9/11" with the fervor they once watched flicks featuring man-eating sharks and teens bouncing about on beach blankets. So what's in store this summer? Ever since Robert Flaherty headed north to the Arctic to film Inuits for his 1922 groundbreaking "Nanook of the North," documentaries have transported audiences to faraway places.
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NEWS
June 2, 2005 | Nancy Ramsey, Special to The Times
"I missed the Rwandan genocide, I'm embarrassed to say," filmmaker Peter Raymont readily admits. "Like many people in journalism and filmmaking. I remember vague reports of tribal warfare in some obscure African country."
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NEWS
June 2, 2005 | Nancy Ramsey, Special to The Times
"I missed the Rwandan genocide, I'm embarrassed to say," filmmaker Peter Raymont readily admits. "Like many people in journalism and filmmaking. I remember vague reports of tribal warfare in some obscure African country."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2005 | Nancy Ramsey, Special to The Times
LAST summer found audiences flocking to documentaries such as "Fahrenheit 9/11" with the fervor they once watched flicks featuring man-eating sharks and teens bouncing about on beach blankets. So what's in store this summer? Ever since Robert Flaherty headed north to the Arctic to film Inuits for his 1922 groundbreaking "Nanook of the North," documentaries have transported audiences to faraway places.
NEWS
February 26, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
U.N. peacekeepers could have saved hundreds of thousands of lives during the 1994 genocide in Rwanda if world leaders had responded to pleas for 50,000 troops and more equipment, the U.N. force's commander at the time, Canadian Gen. Romeo Dallaire, told the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, convened in the northeastern Tanzanian town of Arusha. It was not the United Nations but world leaders who were to blame, Dallaire said.
NEWS
July 8, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The first U.N. relief flight in weeks landed at Kigali airport as efforts were stepped up to forge a cease-fire between victorious Rwandan rebels and remaining government forces. The Canadian military transport plane flew to the Rwandan capital from Nairobi, Kenya, with supplies and troop reinforcements for the small U.N. contingent that has battled for weeks to save people from slaughter. "You are welcome," Maj. Gen. Romeo Dallaire, commander of U.N.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | From Associated Press
The commander of U.N. troops in Rwanda appealed to the United States on Wednesday to send armored personnel carriers and other equipment to help evacuate thousands of refugees. A U.S. official said later in Washington that the commander will get about 50 vehicles and that arrangements are being worked out. The commander, Brig. Gen. Romeo Dallaire of Canada, also said that a U.N.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | Associated Press
Thirteen Rwandan clergymen, including the Roman Catholic archbishop of Kigali and two bishops, were killed by four rebel soldiers assigned to guard them, Rwandan rebel radio said Wednesday. Radio Muhabura, monitored by the British Broadcasting Corp., said three of the soldiers fled and a fourth was shot and killed by other rebel guards. A search was under way to find the escaped soldiers and bring them to trial before a military tribunal, the radio said.
NEWS
June 18, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
U.N.-brokered peace talks in Rwanda stalled Friday after rebels killed a peacekeeper and a pro-government Hutu militia, blamed for widespread massacres, stormed a hotel sheltering refugees. "The talks essentially stalled because of the day's events," the commander of U.N. forces in Rwanda, Maj. Gen. Romeo Dallaire, told reporters. He said a date for resumption of the talks would be announced later.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2010 | By Gary Goldstein
"Aftershock," a blockbuster in its native China and that country's official entry for 2010's foreign-language film Oscar, has made a mostly smooth transition across the Pacific onto American screens. In fact, this involving, well-acted saga of a family torn apart by a devastating earthquake is such a foolproof crowd-pleaser it could likely withstand a release here well beyond its Asian-targeted bookings. Directed by Feng Xiaogang, China's most commercially successful filmmaker, from a script by Su Xiaowei (based on the novel by Chinese Canadian author Zhang Ling)
NEWS
September 25, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
A Belgian legislative commission investigating the 1994 genocide in Rwanda is weighing strong evidence that U.N. peacekeepers in the Central African country could have prevented or at least hindered the extermination campaign but were thwarted by superiors at the world body's headquarters in New York. A key document in the panel's investigation, according to a Belgian senator who is a member, is an urgent fax sent by the head of the U.N. peacekeeping force in Rwanda at the time, Canadian Maj.
WORLD
April 5, 2004 | From Reuters
Rwandan President Paul Kagame accused the outside world Sunday of deliberately failing to prevent genocide in his nation, opening a week of events marking the 10th anniversary of the killing of hundreds of thousands of his countrymen.
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