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Romeo Flores Caballero

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1989
A reception for Romeo Flores Caballero, Mexico's consul general in Los Angeles, will be held today in the City Council chambers and followed by a press conference to announce the name of the new consul general assigned to the county. Later in the day, Flores will speak at a luncheon sponsored by the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Orange County and other hosts at Rancho de Mendoza Restaurant in Santa Ana. The consul general will talk about Mexico's recent dramatic economic step that allows foreign companies to own up to 100% of many businesses in Mexico and to invest in other industries from which they had been barred.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
In his first official trip to Orange County, Mexico's consul general in Los Angeles toured a booming commercial strip, strolling past the Ruiz Salon de Belleza, a Mexicana Airlines ticket office and the Teatro Fiesta, which was showing the movie "Tequila Sunrise" with Spanish subtitles. The consul general, Romeo Flores Caballero, was in Santa Ana, the heart of the Latino community in Orange County. And there is no bigger symbol of that presence than 4th Street in downtown, which is lined with a variety of shops with Spanish-language signs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1988 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
Mexican congressman Romeo Flores Caballero, a highly regarded scholar who as a child accompanied his family on treks north to the agricultural fields of Texas, has been named to head the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles, according to consular officials here. Flores, 52, a close friend of President-elect Carlos Salinas de Gortari, is widely known and respected in Southern California academic circles and is regarded as an expert in U.S.-Mexico relations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1989
A reception for Romeo Flores Caballero, Mexico's consul general in Los Angeles, will be held today in the City Council chambers and followed by a press conference to announce the name of the new consul general assigned to the county. Later in the day, Flores will speak at a luncheon sponsored by the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Orange County and other hosts at Rancho de Mendoza Restaurant in Santa Ana. The consul general will talk about Mexico's recent dramatic economic step that allows foreign companies to own up to 100% of many businesses in Mexico and to invest in other industries from which they had been barred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
In his first official trip to Orange County, Mexico's consul general in Los Angeles toured a booming commercial strip, strolling past the Ruiz Salon de Belleza, a Mexicana Airlines ticket office and the Teatro Fiesta, which was showing the movie "Tequila Sunrise" with Spanish subtitles. The consul general, Romeo Flores Caballero, was in Santa Ana, the heart of the Latino community in Orange County. And there is no bigger symbol of that presence than 4th Street in downtown, which is lined with a variety of shops with Spanish-language signs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1988 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles relief organizations Wednesday announced a coordinated plan to get medicine, building supplies and food to Mexico where rescue workers were still assessing the devastation left by Hurricane Gilbert. "It is a very serious disaster. We are hoping for the generosity of many people," said Romeo Flores Caballero, Mexico's consul general, during a press conference at the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles.
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | RAFAEL PRIETO ZARTHA, Prieto Zartha is a Los Angeles-based free-lance journalist
During a Mexican national holiday celebration, Romeo Flores Caballero was greeted by shouts and insults at his first public appearance as Mexico's consul general in Los Angeles. The demonstrators were protesting against the government of that neighboring country. A year later, the intense work by the educator and politician from Monterrey has paid off, not only in the round of applause he received at this year's Mexican Independence Day commemoration, but also in creating a legacy.
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Sacramento Bureau Chief
The U.S. government plans to start building a controversial ditch at the border near San Diego within 60 days, U.S. immigration Commissioner Alan C. Nelson disclosed Friday, insisting that Mexico should not consider the action "a hostile act." But the Mexican consul general in Los Angeles, Romeo Flores Caballero, interrupted Nelson as he was announcing his plans to reporters and told him pointedly: "You should be building bridges, not ditches." Nelson smiled and said hello.
NEWS
July 17, 1992 | BARBARA BRONSON GRAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Barbara Bronson Gray is a regular contributor to Valley Life
Single, with a 2-year-old son, Anna Guillen came to Canoga Park last year to visit her mother--and she decided not to return to Mexico City. She spoke no English and couldn't find a job here. But Guillen enrolled in a literacy course run by BASE (Basic Adult Spanish Education), a nonprofit organization started five years ago to teach Latinos basic Spanish and English literacy. Now she works at the nearby El Pollo Loco, taking orders.
NEWS
February 18, 1989 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Sacramento Bureau Chief
The U. S. government plans to start building a controversial ditch at the border near San Diego within 60 days, U. S. immigration Commissioner Alan C. Nelson disclosed Friday, insisting that Mexico should not consider the action "a hostile act." But the Mexican consul general in Los Angeles, Romeo Flores Caballero, interrupted Nelson as he was announcing his plans to reporters and told him pointedly: "You should be building bridges, not ditches." Nelson smiled and said hello.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1988 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
Mexican congressman Romeo Flores Caballero, a highly regarded scholar who as a child accompanied his family on treks north to the agricultural fields of Texas, has been named to head the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles, according to consular officials here. Flores, 52, a close friend of President-elect Carlos Salinas de Gortari, is widely known and respected in Southern California academic circles and is regarded as an expert in U.S.-Mexico relations.
NEWS
December 1, 1988 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
When he returns from today's inauguration of Mexico's new president, Romeo R. Flores Caballero will be coming back to offices that don't look like an important outpost of a long-established government. The hallways are dark, narrow and shabby. The elevator apparently can be summoned only by telepathy. Most of the rooms are too small and the furniture nondescript, at best. Even Flores thinks it's humorous that there is only one official car, even though there are more than 60 employees.
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