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ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1988 | GREGG BARRIOS
The occupants of the red sedan tensed. Several yards ahead, blue-uniformed federales herded people out of their cars at a roadblock. Women and babies were crying. In their eagerness to find a cache of drugs or weapons the soldiers had overturned family belongings and heaved them on the side of the road. The guns the soldiers carried--and on occasion pointed at people--were loaded. A passenger in the car urged the driver not to be cocky with the young soldier who approached.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2003 | Gene Seymour, Newsday
George A. Romero made one of history's three (or four) greatest horror films with "Night of the Living Dead" (1968). He's also made at least two (or three) others on his own terms that are almost as good, if not on a par with that masterly nightmare. Yet Romero's name doesn't come up nearly as often as it should in discussions of influential American filmmakers of the 20th century's last half.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2003 | Gene Seymour, Newsday
George A. Romero made one of history's three (or four) greatest horror films with "Night of the Living Dead" (1968). He's also made at least two (or three) others on his own terms that are almost as good, if not on a par with that masterly nightmare. Yet Romero's name doesn't come up nearly as often as it should in discussions of influential American filmmakers of the 20th century's last half.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1988 | GREGG BARRIOS
The occupants of the red sedan tensed. Several yards ahead, blue-uniformed federales herded people out of their cars at a roadblock. Women and babies were crying. In their eagerness to find a cache of drugs or weapons the soldiers had overturned family belongings and heaved them on the side of the road. The guns the soldiers carried--and on occasion pointed at people--were loaded. A passenger in the car urged the driver not to be cocky with the young soldier who approached.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2000 | By Jennifer Kho, (949) 574-4209
A free screening of "Romero," a movie based on the true story of assassinated Archbishop Oscar Romero of El Salvador, will be at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in Saddleback College's Student Services Center, 28000 Marguerite Parkway. The screening is part of the college's Latin Film Festival, which includes one free movie each month. Information: (949) 582-4788.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2010 | By Ben Fritz
What once looked like a clear-cut weekend at the box office has turned into a pitched battle. Overture Films' horror remake "The Crazies" has come on strong in pre-release surveys of moviegoers and has a shot at challenging Warner Bros.' buddy comedy "Cop Out" to be the top new film this weekend, people familiar with the situation said. Just a couple of weeks ago, Warner's bigger budget movie, which stars Bruce Willis and Tracy Morgan, appeared certain to prevail. Now both movies are on track to open to between $15 million and $20 million in sales in the U.S. and Canada from Friday through Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1991 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The first time I saw "Night of the Living Dead" was in 1972, in the basement of a radical student group's headquarters near UC Berkeley. Everybody was excited that George Romero's movie had come to town. Back then, it still belonged to a subculture that layered most things obscure and peculiar with a kind of anti-traditionalist veneer. The word was that "Night of the Living Dead," a crude thriller made for only $100,000, was too creepy for the big theater chains.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2008 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
In "George A. Romero's Diary of the Dead," the director's most recent and least successful vision of the zombie apocalypse, a group of film students dodges Pennsylvania's undead in a tricked-out Winnebago while recording every second of the catastrophe for posterity. (They're not above reenacting the good bits for the camera when necessary, either.) Of course, the joke is that posterity is pretty much toast.
SPORTS
January 2, 1997 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
OK, Steve Spurrier, here's what happened while you were out watching a movie--Bobby Bowden's latest hits?--with your Florida Gators, pretending not to care about the outcome of the Rose Bowl: Joe Germaine threw a four-yard touchdown pass to David Boston with 19 seconds left, No. 4 Ohio State beat No. 2 Arizona State, 20-17, making this the luckiest New Year's Day of your brilliant life.
SPORTS
October 16, 1985 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
Joaquin Andujar, one profane Dominican, was holding court in front of his locker, confounding the reporters as usual. "You've got to be angry," he was explaining. "You have to have some guts, some temper." And then he said, as matter-of-factly as possible, "If you're a (bleep), you can't play this game." A reporter, there to correct all those negative columns by the out-of-towners and even some in-towners, said helpfully, "Joaquin, I can't write that." Now Andujar looked puzzled.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2006 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
THE one "Dracula" movie noticeably missing from American Cinematheque's "The Blood Is the Life: Vampires on Film" program at the Aero Theatre is -- "Dracula." The 1931 Tod Browning-directed granddaddy of all vampire epics that made a star of Hungarian actor Bela Lugosi was unavailable because of Halloween. "We booked it too late," says co-programmer Chris D. "This was a good 2 1/2 or three months ago."
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