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Romulus Linney

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2011
Paul Picerni Prolific character actor Paul Picerni, 88, a prolific character actor who costarred in the television series "The Untouchables" and was featured in the 1953 horror movie "House of Wax," died Jan. 12 of a heart attack at his home in the Antelope Valley community of Llano, said his daughter, Maria Atkinson-Bates. He was pronounced dead at Palmdale Regional Medical Center. Picerni portrayed Agent Lee Hobson, sidekick to Eliot Ness, played by series star Robert Stack.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2011
Paul Picerni Prolific character actor Paul Picerni, 88, a prolific character actor who costarred in the television series "The Untouchables" and was featured in the 1953 horror movie "House of Wax," died Jan. 12 of a heart attack at his home in the Antelope Valley community of Llano, said his daughter, Maria Atkinson-Bates. He was pronounced dead at Palmdale Regional Medical Center. Picerni portrayed Agent Lee Hobson, sidekick to Eliot Ness, played by series star Robert Stack.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1988 | NANCY CHURNIN
A question naturally arises when a theater changes artistic hands as the Bowery Theatre did--in the midst of its last show, the extended hit "Danny and the Deep Blue Sea." Will the Bowery maintain the level of excellence that has made it one of San Diego County's best non-Equity theaters for serious contemporary American plays? Things seems resoundingly on the right track with "Laughing Stock," two previously unpaired one-act comedies by Romulus Linney.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I'm not sure why I wanted to do it," said Romulus Linney about his novel "Heathen Valley" that he turned into a play. "Maybe it was just wondering if I could. As a novel, it's a sprawling historical story with many characters. But as I got into it, I found that underneath a great deal of what was the novel, there was a sort of play lurking."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I'm not sure why I wanted to do it," said Romulus Linney about his novel "Heathen Valley" that he turned into a play. "Maybe it was just wondering if I could. As a novel, it's a sprawling historical story with many characters. But as I got into it, I found that underneath a great deal of what was the novel, there was a sort of play lurking."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I'm not sure why I wanted to do it," said Romulus Linney about his novel "Heathen Valley" that he turned into a play. "Maybe it was just wondering if I could. As a novel, it's a sprawling historical story with many characters. But as I got into it, I found that underneath a great deal of what was the novel, there was a sort of play lurking."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Prize for '2': Romulus Linney's "2" has been named the best new play that opened outside New York last year by the American Theatre Critics Assn. Linney wins $1,000, and excerpts from "2" and the runners-up--Scott McPherson's "Marvin's Room," produced at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago, and Anthony Clarvoe's "Pick Up Axe," produced at San Francisco's Eureka Theatre--will be included in the 1989-90 edition of the Burns Mantle Theatre Yearbook.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN
What am I looking forward to seeing this summer? All the shows that got past me this spring, starting with Taper Too's "Standup Tragedy." It transfers to the Taper mainstage on Thursday. Also--"Phantom of the Opera," despite the buildup (Ahmanson, Wednesday.) John Steppling's "Teenage Wedding"--a suspiciously cheerful title from our darkest playwright (Cast Theatre, July 1.) The Padua Hills Playwrights Playwrights Festival--where Steppling and Jon Robin Baitz got started (CSU Northridge, Aug. 6.)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1993 | RICHARD STAYTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes a brilliant actor can salvage an otherwise pedestrian production. During a redundant military courtroom drama, "Love Suicide at Schofield Barracks," a distracted elderly gentleman takes the stand. He mutters, hesitates, considers each response, rarely gestures--yet we're hypnotized. How does Jeff Corey seize our breathless attention?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
A snake cult in the South is a subject that most playwrights wouldn't pick up on a bet. There's the problem of whether to show the snakes. There's the problem of getting an audience to identify with the bizarre people who worship them. Romulus Linney was raised in the South and doesn't see his characters in "Holy Ghosts" as necessarily bizarre. Troubled, yes. But no more so than many more conventional worshipers--and non-worshipers.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I'm not sure why I wanted to do it," said Romulus Linney about his novel "Heathen Valley" that he turned into a play. "Maybe it was just wondering if I could. As a novel, it's a sprawling historical story with many characters. But as I got into it, I found that underneath a great deal of what was the novel, there was a sort of play lurking."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1988 | NANCY CHURNIN
A question naturally arises when a theater changes artistic hands as the Bowery Theatre did--in the midst of its last show, the extended hit "Danny and the Deep Blue Sea." Will the Bowery maintain the level of excellence that has made it one of San Diego County's best non-Equity theaters for serious contemporary American plays? Things seems resoundingly on the right track with "Laughing Stock," two previously unpaired one-act comedies by Romulus Linney.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1999 | JANA J. MONJI
Romulus Linney's "2," at Theatre 40, is about a defiant Hermann Goering plotting his defense and heroic demise during the Nuremberg war crimes trials. Yet this production lacks a charismatic stage presence at its center, as well as strong supporting performances. As Goering, Milt Kogan towers over the other actors, including his armed guards. With this physical advantage, Kogan blusters and dominates the ensemble.
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