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SPORTS
November 27, 2001 | Paul McLeod
Goalkeeper Jenna Huff of the Edison girls' soccer team has committed to Nevada, her father, Ron, said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Kurt Streeter
A votive in a glass holder, etched with the Star of David and the words "In memory," sits on the granite table. "We will remember the terrible tragedy," Ron Wolfson says, referring to the previous day's shootings at two Jewish facilities in Kansas. The three deaths seem particularly painful on this Monday night Seder, which marks the start of Passover, the eight-day Jewish celebration of the Israelites' flight from bondage in Egypt. Wolfson and his wife are gathered in their Encino home with four generations - 16 people in all, family and friends from as far as New York.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Mona Simpson
The first person besides my mother who believed in me was a man whose last name I never knew. He was my boss, the manager of Swenson's Ice Cream shop. Six foot five, in high topped converse, Ron was 28 and carless in Los Angeles. We knew little about him, except that he made the ice cream store his life. He set about to improve everything, including us. He insisted we tie our hair back tight against the head(so unflattering!). He made us practice scooping until our ice cream balls weighed exactly 3 ounces.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Mike Boehm
Los Angeles officials are starting to get serious about freeing up $7.5 million or more in city government funds that are earmarked for visual art, performances or other cultural events, but have been wrapped tightly for years in legal red tape. The unspent funds were rendered all but useless in 2007 when then-City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo ruled that the fees developers are required to pay to fund public art had to be spent within a one-block radius of the construction project that generated the fees.
BOOKS
September 11, 2005 | Lisa Teasley, Lisa Teasley is the author of the short-story collection "Glow in the Dark" and the novels "Dive" and the forthcoming "Heat Signature."
IN spates of B's, Bertice Berry introduces the black Georgia women of her novel, "When Love Calls, You Better Answer": the dead narrator Aunt Babe and Buster, who is Aunt Babe's sister and negligent mother to Bernita Brown, their beloved victim who has fled them. Alliteration and poetry stop there as Aunt Babe weighs us down with explanations of her ghostly omniscience.
SPORTS
February 24, 1995 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Greg Louganis hit his head on the diving board and spilled his blood into the pool at the 1988 Olympic Games, did he have an obligation to disclose to doctors who treated him and to other athletes using the pool that he was HIV-positive?
NEWS
August 14, 1993 | ELLIOTT ALMOND and DANNY ROBBINS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The mystery surrounding the bizarre disappearance of the father of Chicago Bulls basketball superstar Michael Jordan was partially solved Friday when a body that had been found floating in a South Carolina creek on Aug. 3 was identified as that of James Jordan. Officials said that the cause of death was a single gunshot wound to the chest. Jordan, 57, had been missing for three weeks and it wasn't until Thursday that the matter became public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2000 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours before he was killed, Nick Markowitz thought he was finally going home. It had been a strange, often scary two-day odyssey since a group of young men had snatched him off the street in his West Hills neighborhood and carted him up the coast to Santa Barbara, according to testimony before a Santa Barbara County grand jury released last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1998 | STEVE CHAWKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the phone rings in the Chatoff kitchen, it could be a credit-card pitch--or it could be a well-known actress with emotional problems less well-known to her fans. "Trust the process," Steven Chatoff counsels in a firm, soothing voice. "Trust it." Translation: Take your medication. The problem right now isn't the business. The problem is you. From his Thousand Oaks home, Chatoff routinely delivers such messages to entertainment figures--particularly rock musicians--on both coasts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2013 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Shelby Grad
The U.S. Geological Survey this week released a report assessing the tsunami risk in California. The research simulated a 9.1 quake off the Alaska coast that would send damaging waves to California. Here are some highlights. 1) What are the parts of Southern California most vulnerable to tsunami flooding? The USGS study listed several areas, including Marina del Rey and the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach as well as the low-lying coastal areas extending from the ports to Newport Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
What do Jesus and Church of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard have in common? According to authors Reza Aslan and Lawrence Wright, there are indeed commonalities. Fans and avid readers flocked to the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books on Saturday to hear Aslan and Wright speak during an hourlong panel moderated by Times Editor-in-Chief Davan Maharaj. “You will leave enlightened, I hope,” Maharaj said when introducing the panel. Aslan, author of “Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth,” and Wright, author of “Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood & the Prison of Belief,” delved deeper into parallels between the two religious figures featured in their books.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Mona Simpson
The first person besides my mother who believed in me was a man whose last name I never knew. He was my boss, the manager of Swenson's Ice Cream shop. Six foot five, in high topped converse, Ron was 28 and carless in Los Angeles. We knew little about him, except that he made the ice cream store his life. He set about to improve everything, including us. He insisted we tie our hair back tight against the head(so unflattering!). He made us practice scooping until our ice cream balls weighed exactly 3 ounces.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Greg Braxton, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Amazon Studios is greenlighting two series pilots, continuing its strategy of having customers watch and provide feedback on what shows they would like to see developed into full series. One pilot is "The Cosmopolitans," a half-hour dramatic comedy from director Whit Stillman ("Metropolitan") about a group of young American expatriates in Paris searching for love and friendship. It stars Adam Brody, Chloe Sevigny and Dree Hemingway. The pilot is to begin shooting this week in Paris.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | Steve Lopez
Two opposing forces squared off last week in the latest round of a long-running battle over a $40-million mystery. In one corner was one of the most powerful heavyweights in the history of local politics: Brian D'Arcy of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 18. On the other side was a wonkish, nerdy newcomer on the political scene: City Controller Ron Galperin. And the pipsqueak knocked out the bully. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge James Chalfant ruled that Galperin has every right to issue subpoenas and audit two nonprofit trusts under the joint control of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and D'Arcy, who has refused to comply with requests for more information on how $40 million of ratepayer money that went to the trusts was spent.
FOOD
March 27, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
Terroir . Wild yeasts. Elevation. Who knew these terms could apply to mezcal as easily as to wine. In fact, "the vocabulary of mezcal is more like the vocabulary of wine than spirits," explains Ron Cooper, the California artist who founded Del Maguey single-village mezcals 20 years ago when the beverage wasn't on anybody's radar. "We're talking about terroir , about mouth feel," he says. "We're talking about aroma, nose. " He can go on for hours, recounting the long history of mezcal made in remote villages hours off dirt roads.
SPORTS
March 26, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
As Shabazz Muhammad's father is sentenced Thursday in U.S. District Court in Las Vegas for conspiracy to commit fraud, UCLA faces its most significant men's basketball game since 2008. Muhammad is in the NBA now, but the off-court problems he brought to UCLA last season continue to dog the school. According to a sentencing brief filed last week , Ron Holmes told the FBI he received a loan based on his son's future professional basketball earnings. Estimated at $350,000 in another court document, the loan was Holmes' principal source of income at the time and came from an unnamed "marketing company.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home Box Office collected the most honors at Saturday's nighttime Emmy Awards presentation in Pasadena, including multiple statuettes for dramatic series "The Sopranos" and its movies "The Rat Pack" and "Winchell." Saturday's nontelevised event encompassed more than 50 categories, primarily in technical areas such as cinematography, editing and sound. An additional 27 awards, recognizing programs and performers, will be presented Sept. 12 and televised on Fox.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1998 | SCOTT STEEPLETON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A former gang member died Thursday morning in what police called a gang-related shooting--making 1998 the second year in a row that Santa Paula has reported Ventura County's first homicide of the year. As officers spent New Year's Day searching for suspects, community leaders pointed to the killing as further evidence that the city needs to deal with its gang problems. Louie Fonseca, 27, was found at 1:48 a.m. bleeding in the street in the 100 block of Marin Road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
SAN FRANCISCO -- Ron Smith, a rare campaign strategist who worked both sides of the partisan aisle, managing races for some of California's most prominent politicians in a decades-long career, has died. He was 71 and suffered a blood infection. Smith, who was openly gay long before it was widely accepted, promoted candidates who shared his philosophy of fiscal conservatism and broad-mindedness on social issues. Most were Republicans, including several from Silicon Valley, among them former Reps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Ron Smith, a rare campaign strategist who worked both sides of the partisan aisle, managing races for some of California's most prominent politicians in a decades-long career, died Tuesday at a hospital in San Francisco. He was 71 and had a blood infection. Smith, who was openly gay long before it was widely accepted, promoted candidates who shared his philosophy of fiscal conservatism and broad-mindedness on social issues. Most were Republicans, including several from Silicon Valley, among them former Reps.
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