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Ron Abel

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
"If I didn't want the attention, I wouldn't have this hair," said musical director Ron Abel, shaking his white-blond mane. "Still, I'm never comfortable being the focus on stage. I'm at home behind a piano, behind people singing." As an accompanist, some of those singers have included Peter Allen, Paula Kelly, Linda Purl and Donna McKechnie. In theater, he has musical-directed "Godspell," "The Ritz," the recent hit "Mail" and, currently, "Blame It on the Movies" at the Coast Playhouse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2008 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Ron Abel is one of the busiest multi-hyphenates in the musical-theater world. So it was appropriate that the Actors Fund kicked off its 2008 "Musical Mondays" cabaret series with a showcase presentation of Abel's music Monday night in the Art Deco lobby of the Pantages Theatre. Many similar honorees might have been content to simply sit back and enjoy the plaudits.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2008 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Ron Abel is one of the busiest multi-hyphenates in the musical-theater world. So it was appropriate that the Actors Fund kicked off its 2008 "Musical Mondays" cabaret series with a showcase presentation of Abel's music Monday night in the Art Deco lobby of the Pantages Theatre. Many similar honorees might have been content to simply sit back and enjoy the plaudits.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY
Where do the good songs go? In 1917, lyricist P.G. Wodehouse outlined the journey taken by old songs after "they had their day and then we threw them away." The heavenly ditties flew to a land "on the other side of the moon," where "they're always loved and they're always new," wrote Wodehouse. These lines were part of "The Land Where the Good Songs Go," a number from the musical "Miss 1917," for which Jerome Kern wrote the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1986 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
"We've been engaged for about a year and now we've decided to get married. "We're going to tie the knot. "We're going to call it Public Stage/L.A. Basically, Public Stage at the Coronet and Public Stage on Canon." The voices talking over each other Monday, racing ahead at such joint purposes, were those of Susan Dietz (artistic director of L.A. Stage Co.) and Peg Yorkin (artistic director of the L.A. Public Theatre), the two most active operators of mid-size theaters in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY
Where do the good songs go? In 1917, lyricist P.G. Wodehouse outlined the journey taken by old songs after "they had their day and then we threw them away." The heavenly ditties flew to a land "on the other side of the moon," where "they're always loved and they're always new," wrote Wodehouse. These lines were part of "The Land Where the Good Songs Go," a number from the musical "Miss 1917," for which Jerome Kern wrote the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1997
A group of Southern California's premier pianists and cabaret artists will gather Saturday at sunset in Heritage Square in Montecito Heights to raise money for two AIDS service groups, including one that provides pets to patients for support. Musicians scheduled to perform for PAWS/LA and Aid for AIDS include Albert Hague (composer of "The Grinch That Stole Christmas"), Renee Orin, Ron Abel and Nancy Dussault, plus many more. The performances begin at 8 p.m. after a VIP reception.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
How crowded was it at the Gardenia on Friday night? Well, Michael Jackson and Elizabeth Taylor couldn't have gotten in without a reservation. And why the crowd? Because Paula Kelly was breaking in her new nightclub singing act. Paula Kelly the dancer, Paula Kelly the actress, could enjoy a triumphant career simply as Paula Kelly the singer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS
Fortune seldom smiles on "Twist of Fate," the new musical at the Tiffany Theater. Librettist Lissa Levin and composer Ron Abel collaborated on this slender tale of Dominique (Lisa Raggio), a Gypsy fortuneteller arrested for illegally plying her trade to an undercover cop. The love interest is Dominique's defense attorney, Michael (Dan Gerrity); conflict comes courtesy of her headstrong teenage daughter, Olivia (Tia Texada).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1998
Music The Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra with Jeffrey Kahane conducting and on piano, ends its season Friday-Saturday. The program: Overture, "The Fair Melusine" (Mendelssohn); Piano Concerto No. 15, K. 450 (Mozart); "Antiphonies" (Crockett); Overture, Scherzo and Finale (Schumann). Friday, 8 p.m. at the Veterans Wadsworth Theater, 10000 Wilshire Blvd., West Los Angeles. Saturday, 8 p.m. at the Alex Theatre, 216 N. Brand Blvd., Glendale. $12-$42. (213) 622-7001, Ext. 215.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
"If I didn't want the attention, I wouldn't have this hair," said musical director Ron Abel, shaking his white-blond mane. "Still, I'm never comfortable being the focus on stage. I'm at home behind a piano, behind people singing." As an accompanist, some of those singers have included Peter Allen, Paula Kelly, Linda Purl and Donna McKechnie. In theater, he has musical-directed "Godspell," "The Ritz," the recent hit "Mail" and, currently, "Blame It on the Movies" at the Coast Playhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1986 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
"We've been engaged for about a year and now we've decided to get married. "We're going to tie the knot. "We're going to call it Public Stage/L.A. Basically, Public Stage at the Coronet and Public Stage on Canon." The voices talking over each other Monday, racing ahead at such joint purposes, were those of Susan Dietz (artistic director of L.A. Stage Co.) and Peg Yorkin (artistic director of the L.A. Public Theatre), the two most active operators of mid-size theaters in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Singer Kaitlin Hopkins has a lot going for her. At the relatively young age of 25, her voice has already matured into a warmly expressive instrument. Hopkins looks good, has an easy on-stage manner, and clearly has inherited many of the superb acting instincts of her mother, Shirley Knight. Her opening set at the Cinegrill Wednesday night was a well-rehearsed, carefully planned exercise in contemporary cabaret.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1998 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
There's no surer proof that the Pasadena Playhouse is feeling schizophrenic than its new show, a harmless revue called "Blame It On the Movies!: The Reel Music of Hollywood." Just previously, with his production of Tom Stoppard's "The Real Thing," recently arrived artistic director Sheldon Epps alerted subscribers that he would interrupt the playhouse's usual menu of bromide-filled theater with more challenging fare. But, as if to make sure no one gets too alarmed, "Blame It on the Movies!"
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