Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRon Asheton
IN THE NEWS

Ron Asheton

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009 | Randy Lewis
Mike Watt, bassist for the Minutemen and Firehose, was invited in 2003 by Iggy Pop to join the Stooges when the seminal Michigan band reunited for its first performance in nearly 30 years at the Coachella Valley Arts & Music Festival. He continued to perform and record as a Stooge alongside founding members Ron Asheton, the guitarist who was found dead this week; his brother, drummer Scott Asheton; and saxophonist Steve Mackay. Watt spoke Tuesday to The Times' Randy Lewis about his close friend.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Todd Martens
Scott Asheton, the rhythmic anchor of the Stooges and a godfather of punk rock, died Saturday of unspecified causes. He was 64. Asheton's death was made public by Iggy Pop , now the sole surviving founding member of the Stooges, a group whose aggressiveness and divisiveness would in the late '60s and early '70s lay the foundation for punk and alternative rock. The Stooges' most recent publicity firm, Nasty Little Man, also acknowledged Asheton's death. “Scott was a great artist.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2009 | Randy Lewis
Ron Asheton, whose scorching and energetic guitar work behind singer Iggy Pop in the Michigan punk band the Stooges established a new model of raw emotion for a succeeding generation of punk, grunge and alternative rockers, has died. He was 60. Asheton's body was discovered Tuesday at his home in Ann Arbor, Mich., after his personal assistant had been unable to reach him. Ann Arbor Police Sgt.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Forty years on from their landmark proto-punk album "Raw Power," Iggy and the Stooges announced Monday that they've completed a new studio album, "Ready to Die," set for release April 30 through Fat Possum Records. It's the first time Iggy Pop has made a full record with guitarist James Williamson and drummer Scott Asheton since 1973's "Raw Power," which followed a pair of albums without Williamson credited simply to the Stooges. (Asheton's brother Ron was the Michigan band's founding guitarist.)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2009 | Randy Lewis
Will tongues be wagging at next year's Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony? Specifically, the prodigious one that belongs to Gene Simmons of KISS, one of a dozen acts that made the final ballot from which five 2010 honorees will be chosen. Along with KISS, on the ballot for the first time are the Red Hot Chili Peppers, LL Cool J, Laura Nyro, Jimmy Cliff, the Hollies and Genesis. Returning for another shot at induction this year are the Stooges (whose lead guitarist, Ron Asheton, died in January)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2014 | By Todd Martens
Scott Asheton, the rhythmic anchor of the Stooges and a godfather of punk rock, died Saturday of unspecified causes. He was 64. Asheton's death was made public by Iggy Pop , now the sole surviving founding member of the Stooges, a group whose aggressiveness and divisiveness would in the late '60s and early '70s lay the foundation for punk and alternative rock. The Stooges' most recent publicity firm, Nasty Little Man, also acknowledged Asheton's death. “Scott was a great artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Forty years on from their landmark proto-punk album "Raw Power," Iggy and the Stooges announced Monday that they've completed a new studio album, "Ready to Die," set for release April 30 through Fat Possum Records. It's the first time Iggy Pop has made a full record with guitarist James Williamson and drummer Scott Asheton since 1973's "Raw Power," which followed a pair of albums without Williamson credited simply to the Stooges. (Asheton's brother Ron was the Michigan band's founding guitarist.)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2009 | By Evelyn McDonnell
Iggy Pop walks on a sea of hands. In the photo, shot in Cincinnati in 1970, the singer, then 23, stands upright while fans' hands snake up his calves. He is, quintessentially, shirtless; the muscles of his torso ripple. A palpable energy powers the still image. Every face is turned toward him. It's hard not to get a little hagiographic when discussing the Stooges, so extreme is their story, so complete their devotion to their cause. That cause, of course, was a sort of nihilism: Rarely have musicians waded so deeply into the muck of violence, boredom, drugs, chaos, insanity and sadomasochism -- in both their music and their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2001 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Punk was bigger once. Not financially, but in its reach--back when the Clash, Patti Smith, the Ramones and Talking Heads could mix comfortably beneath the same marquee, and before hard-core became punk's defining aesthetic. Rock guitar virtuoso Wayne Kramer remembers those days, which were partly inspired by his own work in the '60s with the revolutionary MC5. It has led him to produce this collection of new tracks by artists who still understand the broader possibilities of punk.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1997 | Steve Hochman
David Bowie said "no" when filmmaker Todd Haynes asked to use a handful of his "Ziggy Stardust"-era songs on the soundtrack of "Velvet Goldmine," set in the early-'70s glam-rock scene and featuring characters more-or-less suggesting Bowie and Iggy Pop. But there will be plenty of Bowie-esque music in the film. Haynes commissioned L.A. band Grant Lee Buffalo to write and record four new songs in a Ziggy mode.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2009 | By Evelyn McDonnell
Iggy Pop walks on a sea of hands. In the photo, shot in Cincinnati in 1970, the singer, then 23, stands upright while fans' hands snake up his calves. He is, quintessentially, shirtless; the muscles of his torso ripple. A palpable energy powers the still image. Every face is turned toward him. It's hard not to get a little hagiographic when discussing the Stooges, so extreme is their story, so complete their devotion to their cause. That cause, of course, was a sort of nihilism: Rarely have musicians waded so deeply into the muck of violence, boredom, drugs, chaos, insanity and sadomasochism -- in both their music and their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2009 | Randy Lewis
Will tongues be wagging at next year's Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony? Specifically, the prodigious one that belongs to Gene Simmons of KISS, one of a dozen acts that made the final ballot from which five 2010 honorees will be chosen. Along with KISS, on the ballot for the first time are the Red Hot Chili Peppers, LL Cool J, Laura Nyro, Jimmy Cliff, the Hollies and Genesis. Returning for another shot at induction this year are the Stooges (whose lead guitarist, Ron Asheton, died in January)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009 | Randy Lewis
Mike Watt, bassist for the Minutemen and Firehose, was invited in 2003 by Iggy Pop to join the Stooges when the seminal Michigan band reunited for its first performance in nearly 30 years at the Coachella Valley Arts & Music Festival. He continued to perform and record as a Stooge alongside founding members Ron Asheton, the guitarist who was found dead this week; his brother, drummer Scott Asheton; and saxophonist Steve Mackay. Watt spoke Tuesday to The Times' Randy Lewis about his close friend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2009 | Randy Lewis
Ron Asheton, whose scorching and energetic guitar work behind singer Iggy Pop in the Michigan punk band the Stooges established a new model of raw emotion for a succeeding generation of punk, grunge and alternative rockers, has died. He was 60. Asheton's body was discovered Tuesday at his home in Ann Arbor, Mich., after his personal assistant had been unable to reach him. Ann Arbor Police Sgt.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2004
I strongly agree with Robert Hilburn's idea that U2 is one of the greatest rock groups ever. Their force and influence is beyond measure. Patti Smith is one of the only women who can one-up Van Morrison (see "Gloria"), and she is one of the most powerful poets of her generation. I am not sure why he sees the Sex Pistols as more important than the Stooges. There wouldn't even be a Sex Pistols without the Stooges. While Steve Jones' guitar work was important in the 1976-78 punk outbreak, take a look at the stuff Ron Asheton was doing years before.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2003 | Natalie Nichols, Special to The Times
Sunday's second and final day of the eclectic All Tomorrow's Parties music festival at the Queen Mary in Long Beach was a mellow affair, largely devoid of security hassles and the huge lines reported Saturday. Crowds eagerly gathered in both the ship's smaller nightclub room and the nearby waterfront park, with seemingly everyone converging on the outdoor space for an electrifying closing set by Iggy & the Stooges.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|