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MAGAZINE
January 28, 2007 | Kateri Butler, Kateri Butler has written for Details and L'Uono Vogue.
To describe a performance by Ron Athey is, at least in part, to sensationalize it. Double-headed dildos, "castration" by tuck with surgical staples, a crown of steel thorns, suspension by hooks through the back, a baseball bat. Blood flows. But a sacredness infuses. Ritual. Exorcism. Taboo. Transcendence. The body invaded. The body politic. AIDS, homophobia, addiction. Religious fanaticism, identity, oppression. Scenes from a harsh life. Pain as transformation, as a way to an altered state.
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MAGAZINE
January 28, 2007 | Kateri Butler, Kateri Butler has written for Details and L'Uono Vogue.
To describe a performance by Ron Athey is, at least in part, to sensationalize it. Double-headed dildos, "castration" by tuck with surgical staples, a crown of steel thorns, suspension by hooks through the back, a baseball bat. Blood flows. But a sacredness infuses. Ritual. Exorcism. Taboo. Transcendence. The body invaded. The body politic. AIDS, homophobia, addiction. Religious fanaticism, identity, oppression. Scenes from a harsh life. Pain as transformation, as a way to an altered state.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Performance artist Ron Athey, who provoked the latest objections by two U.S. senators to granting practices by the National Endowment for the Arts, speaks in dulcet tones and never forgets to say thank you. In fact, sometimes he almost sounds like the Church Lady. But that's not surprising coming from someone whose evangelical aunts reared him to be a child preacher. What might be more shocking is the contrast between Athey's nearly prim manners and his controversial performance art.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard to think of anyone who puts the redemptive power of art to the test more severely than performance artist Ron Athey, who works out his Pentecostal upbringing, his former heroin addiction, his homosexuality and his HIV status in increasingly elaborate--and increasingly meaningful--tableaux vivants in which sadomasochistic practices act as a force of liberation from society's oppressiveness and also from the fear of death. Catherine Gund Saalfield's absorbing 90-minute "Hallelujah!
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard to think of anyone who puts the redemptive power of art to the test more severely than performance artist Ron Athey, who works out his Pentecostal upbringing, his former heroin addiction, his homosexuality and his HIV status in increasingly elaborate--and increasingly meaningful--tableaux vivants in which sadomasochistic practices act as a force of liberation from society's oppressiveness and also from the fear of death. Catherine Gund Saalfield's absorbing 90-minute "Hallelujah!
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With "Hustler White," the notorious underground gay actor-filmmaker Bruce LaBruce has hardly gone mainstream, but this time teeters on the brink of pornography rather than slipping over into it. Graduating from Super 8, LaBruce has had enough money to shoot "Hustler White" like a regular movie--in color yet--but a bigger budget hasn't corrupted him, so to speak. He's just as outrageous and hilarious as ever.
MAGAZINE
February 25, 2007
In an age in which so many troubled teens and young adults engage in "cutting," how can The Times responsibly run a piece extolling artist Ron Athey's performances, which feature him suspending himself by hooks through the back, impaling himself on a torture device and crawling through glass ("In Extremis and in My Life," by Kateri Butler, The Art Issue, Jan. 28)? Athey needs psychiatric intervention or an old-fashioned Pentecostal exorcism of the spirits inhabiting him--not to be glorified and taken seriously in West.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1998
Actor John Fleck joins Diavolo Dance Theatre, David Rousseve, Danielle Brazell, Dan Kwong, Michael Kearns, Ron Athey and others for the first of a two-night celebration at L.A.'s leading home of performance art. Saturday the lineup includes Rachel Rosenthal Co., Tim Miller, Denise Uyehara and Marga Gomez. "Highways Birthday Party," Highways, 1651 18th St., Santa Monica, (213) 660-8587. 8:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1996 | SARA SCRIBNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
San Francisco's Stone Fox delivers a steamy blend of grunge, punk and booty-bumping soul. At a benefit for the AIDS Healthcare Foundation at the Garage in Silver Lake on Sunday, the four women and one man in this outfit harked back to the L.A. tradition of noisy groups playing colorful dives--the Muffs or Celebrity Skin at Raji's, the Lazy Cowgirls at Al's Bar, X just about anywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Willy Jones, the imperious theater critic for Cityscape, a publication that sounds suspiciously like the L.A. Weekly, was driving west on Sunset on his way to Crossroads, a theater that sounds suspiciously like Highways, to see a performance that he had already declared he would pan. Just between Orange and Sycamore, his car was hit by four tons of concrete from a crane dangling high above. Who did it? As is usual when a critic is attacked, the list of suspects includes everyone in the play.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Performance artist Ron Athey, who provoked the latest objections by two U.S. senators to granting practices by the National Endowment for the Arts, speaks in dulcet tones and never forgets to say thank you. In fact, sometimes he almost sounds like the Church Lady. But that's not surprising coming from someone whose evangelical aunts reared him to be a child preacher. What might be more shocking is the contrast between Athey's nearly prim manners and his controversial performance art.
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | MARK EHRMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
First you had the Vienna Secessionists. Then there was Rive Gauche Paris in the '20s. And finally--could it be--Silver Lake in the '90s? It sure can, judging by the talk you hear around Glaxa Studios. We're not talking just some simple theater-type space here. Nope, Glaxa is a veritable multipurpose, free-form locus of aesthetic energy where the avant edge of theater, performance, poetry, dance and music meet and do their thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2012 | By Scott Timberg
Los Angeles-based Juliana Snapper is an avant-garde opera singer who aims to take apart opera and the tradition of singing. The Drama Review has said that "Snapper sings the voice as limit ... unbearably raw, a flayed shred of human need, desire, pain. " She has collaborated with Los Angeles body artist Ron Athey on the work "The Judas Cradle," which premiered at REDCAT, and performed in (and co-created) the world's first underwater opera, "You Who Will Emerge From the Flood," in Manchester, England.
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