Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRon Bass
IN THE NEWS

Ron Bass

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2000 | ROBIN RAUZI
* The prolific Oscar-winner (for co-writing "Rain Man") has more than 20 film credits, including "My Best Friend's Wedding" and "Entrapment." His most recent was "Passion of Mind," which he also produced. Crack of Dawn: Saturday I get up between 4 and 5 a.m. I ride an exercise bicycle, lift weights and read stuff that prepares me to write that day. Then I read the Los Angeles Times and New York Times. I enjoy that part of my day.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Maybe it's the ongoing success of "Lee Daniels' The Butler," or perhaps just the start of soulful autumnal nights, but something has put us in a jazzy, Louis Armstrong kind of mood. All of which is enough to make one wonder if "Something Wonderful," a long-gestating movie about Louis Armstrong from "Butler" star Forest Whitaker, still has a shot of getting off the ground. The man at the controls says it does. PHOTOS: Forest Whitaker: Career retrospective Whitaker tells The Times that he'd still like to direct and act in the independent production, and that he's been working to develop the script with the veteran screenwriter Ron Bass ("Rain Man," "The Joy Luck Club")
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1997 | Elaine Dutka, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
For a guy who earns up to $2 million a script, Ron Bass still pushes himself like some hungry kid straight out of film school. Seven days a week, the Oscar-winning screenwriter begins work between 3 and 4:30 a.m. Skipping breakfast and most often lunch ("Digesting makes me logy," he said), he writes exclusively on yellow loose-leaf paper with No. 2 Sundance pencils made by the Blackfeet Native American tribe.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2005 | John Horn and Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writers
MOVIEMAKING has been a collaborative business since Day 1, but rarely have so many screenwriters converged on so few screenplays. While some upcoming holiday films may be credited to just one writer, that hardly means just one writer wrote the whole movie. In some cases, producers and studios throw different writers at different sections of a story, adding a joke here, some action there. In other instances, a writer -- or team of writers -- does a top-to-bottom rewrite.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1995 | STEPHEN HUNTER, THE BALTIMORE SUN
They do make an odd couple. He's as mild-looking as they come, a smooth, unflappable man in the comfy, anti-style wardrobe of a National Public Radio talk-show host, complete to the beard and horn-rim glasses, the cardigan sweater, the open collar and the well-broken-in shoes. She's who she is, dammit, and she doesn't care who knows about it or what they think. In cowboy boots, black leather jeans, a black velvet blazer and a white lace turtleneck, she's a woman no man would mess with.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1987
In discussing the motion picture "Rainman," Leonard Klady states that Dustin Hoffman asked to replace me with another writer (Outtakes, May 3). This is not the case. I explained to Klady I was engaged on "Rainman" with the clear understanding that my other commitments would permit me only six weeks on the project. Therefore, it was always agreed that another writer would be brought on to polish my material and finish the work. In all of our dealings on the project, Dustin was friendly, constructive and supportive.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1986 | Pat H. Broeske
Who is Ron Bass and why does he have a dozen screenplays in development and production? He said that his 17-year stint as an entertainment lawyer didn't hurt. And then there was a trio of novels--two involving espionage. (One became a little-seen, Bass-scripted film, "Code Name: Emerald," with Ed Harris--"It never even played L.A.," laughed Bass.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1987 | Leonard Klady
Lotsa publicity blurbing about the Dustin Hoffman-Tom Cruise starrer "Rainman," from United Artists, via Guber-Peters, tentatively to begin shooting Aug. 17 (or, as a contingency plan, six to eight weeks after a resolution to the possible Directors Guild strike). But we've picked up additional tidbits. Like unhappiness from Hoffman, who's supposedly wanted a new writer and a new direction for the plot, particularly as it involves his and Cruise's characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Maybe it's the ongoing success of "Lee Daniels' The Butler," or perhaps just the start of soulful autumnal nights, but something has put us in a jazzy, Louis Armstrong kind of mood. All of which is enough to make one wonder if "Something Wonderful," a long-gestating movie about Louis Armstrong from "Butler" star Forest Whitaker, still has a shot of getting off the ground. The man at the controls says it does. PHOTOS: Forest Whitaker: Career retrospective Whitaker tells The Times that he'd still like to direct and act in the independent production, and that he's been working to develop the script with the veteran screenwriter Ron Bass ("Rain Man," "The Joy Luck Club")
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2005 | John Horn and Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writers
MOVIEMAKING has been a collaborative business since Day 1, but rarely have so many screenwriters converged on so few screenplays. While some upcoming holiday films may be credited to just one writer, that hardly means just one writer wrote the whole movie. In some cases, producers and studios throw different writers at different sections of a story, adding a joke here, some action there. In other instances, a writer -- or team of writers -- does a top-to-bottom rewrite.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2000 | ROBIN RAUZI
* The prolific Oscar-winner (for co-writing "Rain Man") has more than 20 film credits, including "My Best Friend's Wedding" and "Entrapment." His most recent was "Passion of Mind," which he also produced. Crack of Dawn: Saturday I get up between 4 and 5 a.m. I ride an exercise bicycle, lift weights and read stuff that prepares me to write that day. Then I read the Los Angeles Times and New York Times. I enjoy that part of my day.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1999 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, Patrick Goldstein is a Times staff writer
Adapting a novel for the screen involves a lot more than just carefully selecting the best scenes and characters from a book. "You don't write an adaptation by editing down a book," says veteran screenwriter Ron Bass, who did the original adaptation of David Guterson's best-selling novel "Snow Falling on Cedars." "I approached 'Snow Falling' as if I were writing an original script," Bass recalls. "You have to find a way to get inside the material, to feel the emotions the people felt.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 1997 | Elaine Dutka, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
For a guy who earns up to $2 million a script, Ron Bass still pushes himself like some hungry kid straight out of film school. Seven days a week, the Oscar-winning screenwriter begins work between 3 and 4:30 a.m. Skipping breakfast and most often lunch ("Digesting makes me logy," he said), he writes exclusively on yellow loose-leaf paper with No. 2 Sundance pencils made by the Blackfeet Native American tribe.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1995 | STEPHEN HUNTER, THE BALTIMORE SUN
They do make an odd couple. He's as mild-looking as they come, a smooth, unflappable man in the comfy, anti-style wardrobe of a National Public Radio talk-show host, complete to the beard and horn-rim glasses, the cardigan sweater, the open collar and the well-broken-in shoes. She's who she is, dammit, and she doesn't care who knows about it or what they think. In cowboy boots, black leather jeans, a black velvet blazer and a white lace turtleneck, she's a woman no man would mess with.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1987
In discussing the motion picture "Rainman," Leonard Klady states that Dustin Hoffman asked to replace me with another writer (Outtakes, May 3). This is not the case. I explained to Klady I was engaged on "Rainman" with the clear understanding that my other commitments would permit me only six weeks on the project. Therefore, it was always agreed that another writer would be brought on to polish my material and finish the work. In all of our dealings on the project, Dustin was friendly, constructive and supportive.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1987 | Leonard Klady
Lotsa publicity blurbing about the Dustin Hoffman-Tom Cruise starrer "Rainman," from United Artists, via Guber-Peters, tentatively to begin shooting Aug. 17 (or, as a contingency plan, six to eight weeks after a resolution to the possible Directors Guild strike). But we've picked up additional tidbits. Like unhappiness from Hoffman, who's supposedly wanted a new writer and a new direction for the plot, particularly as it involves his and Cruise's characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1999 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN, Patrick Goldstein is a Times staff writer
Adapting a novel for the screen involves a lot more than just carefully selecting the best scenes and characters from a book. "You don't write an adaptation by editing down a book," says veteran screenwriter Ron Bass, who did the original adaptation of David Guterson's best-selling novel "Snow Falling on Cedars." "I approached 'Snow Falling' as if I were writing an original script," Bass recalls. "You have to find a way to get inside the material, to feel the emotions the people felt.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1987 | Leonard Klady
Artistic storms continue to clutter UA's "Rainman" horizon (we recently reported Dustin Hoffman's unhappiness with the script): Director Martin Brest and producer Roger Birnbaum are declining comment--but Hoffman attorney Bert Fields confirmed rumors that Brest has left the project (which co-stars Tom Cruise). Sources close to Brest told us that he felt it impossible to control the material and the direction of the picture. At press time, the producers were seeking a replacement.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1986 | Pat H. Broeske
Who is Ron Bass and why does he have a dozen screenplays in development and production? He said that his 17-year stint as an entertainment lawyer didn't hurt. And then there was a trio of novels--two involving espionage. (One became a little-seen, Bass-scripted film, "Code Name: Emerald," with Ed Harris--"It never even played L.A.," laughed Bass.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|