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Ron Botchan

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January 27, 2000 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Botchan is going to the "bullring." He's marching toward another battleground, like those where he once suffered two broken ribs and a gash on his head that required stitches. It's not Pamplona, but to Botchan it's as close as it gets. Botchan is an NFL umpire, the most demanding officiating job on the field, and he is about to run with the bulls from the Tennessee Titans and St. Louis Rams at the Super Bowl on Sunday in Atlanta.
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SPORTS
January 27, 2000 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Botchan is going to the "bullring." He's marching toward another battleground, like those where he once suffered two broken ribs and a gash on his head that required stitches. It's not Pamplona, but to Botchan it's as close as it gets. Botchan is an NFL umpire, the most demanding officiating job on the field, and he is about to run with the bulls from the Tennessee Titans and St. Louis Rams at the Super Bowl on Sunday in Atlanta.
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SPORTS
July 20, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
The NFL said Friday that it has not fired nine officiating trainers who refused to train replacement officials, but the league confirmed it did take back the computers and system access of those trainers. "The officiating trainers have not been fired," league spokesman Brian McCarthy said in an email. "They are seasonal employees who have decided not to work at this time. We asked for their NFL-issued laptops back so that those who are working right now can use them. " That statement was a response to what trainer Jerry Markbreit, a highly respected retired NFL referee, told The Times earlier Friday.
SPORTS
July 20, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
Jerry Markbreit was an NFL official for 33 years, the referee in eight conference championships and four Super Bowls. This week, the league essentially showed him the door. Markbreit, along with eight other former prominent game officials, were apparently fired for refusing to train replacements to take the jobs of locked-out officials. The replacements, many of them high school and junior college officials, met Friday for training in Dallas. “The NFL never actually told us in writing we were fired,” said Markbreit, 77, who retired in 1999 as a game official and has spent the past decade as an officiating trainer.
SPORTS
July 20, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
NFL officials aim to go largely unnoticed, but now they're feeling unappreciated. Locked out in a labor fight, officials are facing the prospect of being supplanted - at least temporarily - by vastly less experienced replacements, some of whom have been plucked from the high school or junior college ranks. What's more, nine of the most respected former officials who later became officiating trainers have been instructed by the league to turn in their computers and no longer have access to the NFL's computer system.
SPORTS
August 23, 2007 | Peter Yoon, Times Staff Writer
Mike Flynt is redefining the meaning of "college senior." The former linebacker was kicked off his college football team for fighting before his senior year and recently disclosed to friends that he regretted not being able to complete his career. So he returned to Sul Ross State in Texas to find out whether he still had eligibility at the Division III school. He did, and has been practicing with the Lobos this year -- 37 years after he last played. Flynt is 59.
SPORTS
January 27, 1997 | RANDY HARVEY
Although he has two small children, I knew it was OK to call my friend Ian in London late on Super Bowl Sunday night/Monday morning. An Oregonian living abroad for the last few years, he figured to be wide awake from the 11:15 p.m. kickoff to the 2:45 a.m. finish for his annual fix of the ultimate in Americana. Here's my question, I told him. I know what a lot of people in New England are doing--watching the game on television. What about Olde England? "Same thing," he said.
SPORTS
July 19, 2012 | By Chuck Schilken
Writers from around Tribune Co. discuss how games might be affected if the NFL referee lockout extends into the regular season. Check back throughout the day for their responses and join the conversation with a comment of your own. Matt Vensel, Baltimore Sun As is the case in any profession, you can expect a drop-off when the best in the business are sitting on the sidelines. This applies to NFL referees as much as it does to its starting quarterbacks and skilled workers away from the gridiron - surgeons, master chefs and hair stylists too. But even though the replacement officials aren't likely to butcher the rules like that woman at the hair salon chain at the mall did to my hair last time around, there will be differences - some subtle and some not. The expansion of replay may prevent game-changing missed calls, but veteran NFL official Ed Hochuli says  that replacement officials threw between one and five penalty flags a game in 2001, the last time replacements were used.
SPORTS
July 31, 2010 | By Sam Farmer
For NFL umpires, safety comes at a cost. They will be out of the line of fire — moving from the middle of the defense to several yards behind the quarterback — but their job won't be any easier. In many ways, it will be harder. "This is a radical change," said retired field official Ron Botchan, widely regarded as the best umpire in NFL history. "It's going to take some adjusting. But the owners wanted it, the competition committee wanted it, and it's their ball, man."
SPORTS
October 12, 1986 | Scott Howard-Cooper
Bob Rosburg, the 1959 PGA champion, will play in the Southern California PGA Senior tournament starting Wednesday at Jurupa Hills CC in Riverside, the richest sectional gathering of its kind in the country. A pro-am will be played Tuesday. Chuck Green of Oxnard is the defending champion in the 54-hole event. Other former winners include ex-PGA champions Jerry Barber and Paul Runyan and former U.S. Open champion Jack Fleck.
SPORTS
December 14, 1998
Not many in the NFL play at a higher emotional level than Kevin Greene. But that intensity got the best of the veteran linebacker Sunday. Greene, tied for second in the league in sacks and one of the best pass rushers in NFL history, attacked Panther assistant coach Kevin Steele on the sideline in the first half of the Carolina Panthers' 28-25 loss to the Washington Redskins at Charlotte, N.C. It was yet another ugly incident for the 2-12 Panthers.
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