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Ron Burkle

BUSINESS
August 31, 2010 | W.J. Hennigan
A high-stakes battle over the nation's largest bookseller escalated Monday as Los Angeles billionaire Ronald W. Burkle accused Barnes & Noble Inc.'s chairman and largest shareholder of self-dealing, approving business deals that benefit himself and his family. The accusatory letter, sent to shareholders Monday, was the latest move in Burkle's monthlong proxy battle to secure three seats — including one for himself — on the company's board of directors. Burkle's investment firm, Yucaipa Cos., owns about 19% of the company and wants to buy more.
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BUSINESS
June 13, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Wild Oats Markets Inc., the closed purveyor of organic and natural foods, is planning a comeback this year, potentially aided by local billionaire Ron Burkle. The company, which has been out of operation since 2007, now says on its website that it is "re-introducing" its brand, bringing beverages, snacks, cereals, pasta and other goods to store shelves. Burkle's Los Angeles private equity company Yucaipa Cos. seems to be involved. A trademark application filed by Wild Oats Marketing last June and published for opposition in late May lists Yucaipa's Sunset Boulevard address.
SPORTS
December 4, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
NEW YORK - Finally, there's reason to believe the NHL and the players' association are listening to each other and might be inching toward a labor agreement that would salvage some semblance of a season. NHL Deputy Commissioner Bill Daly, who has often accused the NHLPA of being unwilling to negotiate, was cordial toward the union after marathon meetings between selected owners and players at a New York hotel Tuesday. That was significant because Daly has been a loud and constant critic of the union's supposed reluctance to compromise.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2006 | Kim Christensen, Robin Abcarian and Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writers
Eli Broad made his fortune building affordable homes for Southern Californians, while Ron Burkle made his by filling their pantries with groceries. On Wednesday, they joined in a bid to buy the Los Angeles Times' parent, Tribune Co. If successful, the two billionaires with no newspaper experience might pull off one of their most audacious deals yet. Broad and Burkle have spent millions cutting separate swaths across the landscape of Southern California arts, culture and philanthropy.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2006 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
Ron Burkle says he loves newspapers. He just doesn't always agree with them. The billionaire Los Angeles investor has been known to sic his lawyer on publications he thought treated him unfairly. He has battled in court to keep reporters from getting his divorce records. Most famously, in late March he set up a videotaped sting in an attempt to catch New York Post gossip writer Jared Paul Stern allegedly trying to extort more than $200,000 from him.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1994 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The turning point came in 1981 when Ron Burkle--then a vice president at the Stater Bros. supermarket chain at the tender age of 29--decided to put together a buyout team and raise money to acquire his employer. Although Petrolane Properties, owner of Stater Bros. at the time, was entertaining offers to buy its supermarket chain, the parent company was not entertained by Burkle's offer.
BUSINESS
March 18, 2010 | By Andrea Chang
Book giant Barnes & Noble Inc. announced a major shakeup of its top management Thursday, saying it was replacing Chief Executive Steve Riggio with the head of its online division. William Lynch, 39, joined the New York company in February 2009 as president of its website, Barnes & Noble.com. He succeeds Riggio, who had been chief executive of the company since 2002 and is the younger brother of company Chairman Leonard Riggio. The move comes at a difficult time for Barnes & Noble.
SPORTS
April 14, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Anaheim's effort to bring a third NBA team to Southern California reached its latest peak Thursday, as the Sacramento Kings' owners explained their interest in making Honda Center their new home and the city's mayor expressed his enthusiasm to Commissioner David Stern in New York. Kings owners Joe and Gavin Maloof were joined by siblings George and Phil in making a 90-minute proposal to the NBA's Board of Governors' relocation committee about the benefits of a new home in Orange County.
MAGAZINE
November 18, 2007 | Tina Daunt, Tina Daunt is a Times staff writer whose Cause Celebre column on Hollywood and politics appears weekly in the Calendar section. She can be reached at Tina.Daunt@latimes.com.
It's high season for politics in Hollywood, with the presidential primaries just weeks away, and that means the glitterati are engaged in their favorite recreational drama: political fundraising at the homes of the rich and famous. There are so many events these days, you need a closet full of pressed suits, a detailed knowledge of Beverly Hills' winding canyon roads and enough money to cover the campaign donations ($2,300 a pop). From the outside, it may look like pay-per-view politics, but you must be on some serious person's serious guest list to get a seat at these soirees.
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