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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Ron Carey, the short and puckish comedic actor who played Officer Carl Levitt on the hit situation comedy "Barney Miller" and was a member of Mel Brooks' comedy troupe in films such as "High Anxiety" and "Silent Movie," has died. He was 71. Carey died of a stroke Tuesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, said Michael Ciccolini, a relative.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Ron Carey, the short and puckish comedic actor who played Officer Carl Levitt on the hit situation comedy "Barney Miller" and was a member of Mel Brooks' comedy troupe in films such as "High Anxiety" and "Silent Movie," has died. He was 71. Carey died of a stroke Tuesday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, said Michael Ciccolini, a relative.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1994 | HARRY BERNSTEIN, Harry Bernstein was for many years The Times' labor writer.
Ron Carey is under intense attack these days by those he battled two years ago to become president of the giant Teamsters Union. Carey helped clean out the mobsters, and is still battling old-guard leaders who tolerated mob dominance for decades. The government-supervised election that Carey won was held after the union's former leaders agreed to it to avoid prosecution on racketeering charges. The union was crime-ridden for years.
NEWS
October 13, 2001 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Carey, the reformist Teamsters president who was ousted from the union in a fund-raising scandal five years ago, was acquitted Friday of lying to investigators during several corruption probes. A federal jury in Manhattan found Carey, 65, not guilty of seven counts of perjury. Each count carried a maximum five-year sentence. "I'm just so delighted," Carey told reporters outside the courtroom. "It obviously opens lots of doors and possibilities, which I'll be looking at."
OPINION
July 17, 1994 | Harry Bernstein, Harry Bernstein covered labor issues for The Times for 32 years
For decades, the scandal-ridden Teamsters Union was dominated by mobsters, its top officers lived in luxury at members' expense, with salaries that ran into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Three of the union's former presidents, along with hundreds of lesser officers, went to prison for white-collar crimes. Most members have relatively good contracts, thanks to many competent local officers, but critics charged that too much of union dues was spent on the top officers.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1997 | From Washington Post
Federal authorities on Friday arrested and charged a Washington political consultant with mail fraud, alleging that he diverted money from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters to help finance the reelection campaign of the union's president, Ron Carey. Martin Davis, 35, a part-owner of a District of Columbia-based direct-mail firm called the November Group, was released on $100,000 bail after being charged by the U.S.
OPINION
June 12, 1994 | HARRY BERNSTEIN, Harry Bernstein was for many years The Times' labor writer.
Teamsters union President Ron Carey won a significant battle last Thursday in one of the most bitter internal union struggles since the fight against communist influence in the labor movement more than four decades ago. The struggle over communism is now just a vague memory, but the ugly civil war for control of the 1.4-million-member Teamsters union is far from over.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1996 | SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Teamster Union President Ron Carey, amid a hotly contested reelection race against the son of the late Jimmy Hoffa, appeared at an East Los Angeles rally Sunday to urge striking workers to organize boycotts of the nation's No. 1 tortilla company. Carey, president of the nation's largest private-sector union, used the flatbed of a truck as his podium to deride Gruma USA, maker of Mission and Guerrero brand tortillas.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1996 | FRANK SWOBODA, WASHINGTON POST
The Teamsters union was forced to recess its convention and call in police Monday to help clear the hall after angry supporters of James P. Hoffa noisily protested actions by the union leadership and drowned out the proceedings, including an attempted speech by U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.).
BUSINESS
March 22, 1994 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Locked in a power struggle with internal rivals three years after his election as a reform leader, Teamsters President Ron Carey unveiled a plan Monday to strip four of his major opponents of much of their clout. The head of the nation's second-largest labor union said he will ask the Teamsters' general executive board, dominated by his supporters, to scrap the four "U.S. area conferences" that for years have handled regional contract talks and grievance disputes.
NEWS
August 28, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Jury selection began in New York in the trial of former Teamsters President Ron Carey on federal charges of lying about the diversion of $885,000 in union funds for his 1996 reelection campaign. Carey, 64, is accused of making false statements to a grand jury, a review board and investigators. Carey's victory over James P. Hoffa was overturned after investigators found that his campaign had indirectly used union money.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1999 | DAVID GLOVIN and SEENA SIMON, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Former top Teamsters official William Hamilton Jr. was convicted of charges he embezzled $885,000 of union funds to help get Ron Carey reelected as union president. The verdict by a federal jury in New York on Friday came on the second day of deliberations in the three-week trial. The jury convicted Hamilton on all counts including fraud, perjury, embezzlement, conspiracy and making false statements to the union election officer.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1998 | Associated Press
Charles Blitz, 45, of Santa Barbara, who helped collect money illegally for the 1996 reelection campaign of Teamsters President Ron Carey, pleaded guilty to making false statements to federal officials investigating the election.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1998 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James P. Hoffa has been cleared by a federal election officer to seek the Teamsters union presidency, making him the front-runner to win the post formerly held by his father, legendary Teamsters boss Jimmy Hoffa. Michael G. Cherkasky, the court-appointed election monitor, ruled that finance violations by Hoffa's campaign were not serious enough to warrant his disqualification from the rerun of the 1996 race he narrowly lost to Ron Carey.
BUSINESS
February 25, 1998 | Washington Post
The court-appointed official overseeing the Teamsters' rerun election proposed a major change in election rules that would allow reformers a chance to run a slate of candidates to oppose James P. Hoffa for the union presidency. Michael Cherkasky asked a federal court to allow candidates to switch political slates for the election this summer, saying that was the only fair way to proceed with Teamsters President Ron Carey out of the race and Hoffa's campaign finances under investigation.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1998 | Washington Post
Publicly testifying under oath for the first time since the start of the campaign finance scandal that has rocked the nation's largest trade union, Teamsters President Ron Carey denied any wrongdoing, portraying himself as a leader who trusted those around him and is now paying the price.
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Ron Carey was elected president of the Teamsters in 1991, advocates of reform inside and outside the nation's largest trade union breathed a sign of relief. Hailed as "Mr. Clean" after a series of scandal-tainted Teamster chiefs, three of whom went to federal prison, Carey pledged to rid his union of mob influence.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1992 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since he assumed the presidency of the Teamsters union six weeks ago, Ron Carey, a dissident Teamster from New York, has systematically been trying to erase the union's image as a slothful royalist empire. He has sold the union's two private jets, reduced his annual salary to $175,000 from $225,000, created an ethics committee and begun hiring consultants to revitalize the 1.5 million-member union, whose membership has fallen by a third in the last decade.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1998 | Bloomberg News
A federal judge upheld the disqualification of Teamsters President Ron Carey from seeking reelection. U.S. District Judge David Edelstein in New York affirmed a decision by a court-appointed monitor to bar Carey from running again. He also refused to order a formal hearing Carey requested to attempt to refute charges of illegal fund-raising. Carey was barred from seeking reelection on Nov.
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