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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Ron Carlson hadn't published a novel in more than a quarter-century when he put out the exquisite "Five Skies" in 2007. It's not that he wasn't working; during that period, he wrote five story collections and a work of YA fiction; he also ran the creative writing program at Arizona State University before taking an equivalent position at UC Irvine in 2006. "I don't feel like there's been any time between anything," he told The Times after "Five Skies" appeared. "I just fell so deeply in love with the short story.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Ron Carlson hadn't published a novel in more than a quarter-century when he put out the exquisite "Five Skies" in 2007. It's not that he wasn't working; during that period, he wrote five story collections and a work of YA fiction; he also ran the creative writing program at Arizona State University before taking an equivalent position at UC Irvine in 2006. "I don't feel like there's been any time between anything," he told The Times after "Five Skies" appeared. "I just fell so deeply in love with the short story.
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BOOKS
February 1, 1987 | Richard Eder
Ron Carlson sees patterns in lives. He sees love, struggle that is sometimes rewarded and bravery. He also sees love turned cannibal, defeat, poltroonery and the doping effects of contemporary life. But the outcome of his stories, whether upbeat or the opposite, tends to be an outpouring instead of an evaporation of spirit. So he is a warm writer, and this makes the collection in "The News of the World" relatively unusual.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Summer is my favorite season - always has been. Partly, it's the light: slow and thick, like a glaze of honey spread across the world. Partly, it's the heat, which I feel in my joints, making me imagine I was loose-limbed again. But more than anything, it's the feeling of space, of the moment expanding, the faith that, during these three months, I might do anything. That's an adolescent's faith, to be sure, but it has lingered, as if there might be (to borrow a phrase from a favorite episode of "The Twilight Zone")
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2003 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
Fans of the big-hearted Southwestern writer Ron Carlson will welcome this selection of 33 short stories reprinted from three previous collections now out of print. Carlson's last new collection, "At the Jim Bridger," came out a year ago. The people of his Southwest do not live in the tradition-haunted enclaves of Latinos and Navajo, or in the even more ancient Indian pueblos or the more recent 150-year-old Mormon settlements of Utah and Arizona, although Mormons do make some appearances.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2009 | Richard Rayner, Rayner's "A Bright and Guilty Place: Murder, Corruption and L.A.'s Scandalous Coming of Age" will be published later this month.
The Signal A Novel Ron Carlson Viking: 184 pp., $25.95 -- Ron Carlson's new novel is a love story and a wilderness adventure that mounts to a climax of shocking, and satisfying, violence. It's a tale from the woods and it begins when Mack, a young Wyoming rancher who's been messing himself up and has just gotten out of jail, arranges to meet his estranged wife, Vonnie, for a trek into the Wind River mountain range he knows so well.
BOOKS
September 16, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Ron Carlson Writes a Story From the First Glimmer of an Idea to the Final Sentence Ron Carlson Graywolf Press: 112 pp., $12 paper -- RON CARLSON has come to trust the process of writing a story, "a process involving radical, substance-changing discovery." When he began teaching some 25 years ago, he taught the craft, "because it was teachable." ("Vision, of course, is not teachable. . . . What a person chooses to write about is not teachable.
BOOKS
May 13, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
RON CARLSON is waiting for the cable guy. It's been more than a week now and he's trying a cowboy tactic, quietly saying exactly when he'll be available -- something like staring a bull in the eyes to mesmerize it. Four months in Southern California and he's become the cable-guy whisperer. Carlson's home reflects what he is: a workingman. A sofa, some chairs. Out on the patio, an empty can for cigarette butts. In the bathroom, a bar of soap and a toothbrush.
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
As you might lean out an attic window at an exaggerated angle to check your roof's soundness--somebody is holding your feet--Ron Carlson uses touches of fantasy that get agreeably out of hand for a better view of the virtues and verities of his middle class. Most of the time someone is holding his feet, yet the grip is disturbingly shaky. Sometimes the fantasy comes down on the reassuring side.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2009 | Richard Rayner, Rayner's "A Bright and Guilty Place: Murder, Corruption and L.A.'s Scandalous Coming of Age" will be published later this month.
The Signal A Novel Ron Carlson Viking: 184 pp., $25.95 -- Ron Carlson's new novel is a love story and a wilderness adventure that mounts to a climax of shocking, and satisfying, violence. It's a tale from the woods and it begins when Mack, a young Wyoming rancher who's been messing himself up and has just gotten out of jail, arranges to meet his estranged wife, Vonnie, for a trek into the Wind River mountain range he knows so well.
BOOKS
September 16, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Ron Carlson Writes a Story From the First Glimmer of an Idea to the Final Sentence Ron Carlson Graywolf Press: 112 pp., $12 paper -- RON CARLSON has come to trust the process of writing a story, "a process involving radical, substance-changing discovery." When he began teaching some 25 years ago, he taught the craft, "because it was teachable." ("Vision, of course, is not teachable. . . . What a person chooses to write about is not teachable.
BOOKS
May 13, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
RON CARLSON is waiting for the cable guy. It's been more than a week now and he's trying a cowboy tactic, quietly saying exactly when he'll be available -- something like staring a bull in the eyes to mesmerize it. Four months in Southern California and he's become the cable-guy whisperer. Carlson's home reflects what he is: a workingman. A sofa, some chairs. Out on the patio, an empty can for cigarette butts. In the bathroom, a bar of soap and a toothbrush.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2003 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
Fans of the big-hearted Southwestern writer Ron Carlson will welcome this selection of 33 short stories reprinted from three previous collections now out of print. Carlson's last new collection, "At the Jim Bridger," came out a year ago. The people of his Southwest do not live in the tradition-haunted enclaves of Latinos and Navajo, or in the even more ancient Indian pueblos or the more recent 150-year-old Mormon settlements of Utah and Arizona, although Mormons do make some appearances.
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
As you might lean out an attic window at an exaggerated angle to check your roof's soundness--somebody is holding your feet--Ron Carlson uses touches of fantasy that get agreeably out of hand for a better view of the virtues and verities of his middle class. Most of the time someone is holding his feet, yet the grip is disturbingly shaky. Sometimes the fantasy comes down on the reassuring side.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Summer is my favorite season - always has been. Partly, it's the light: slow and thick, like a glaze of honey spread across the world. Partly, it's the heat, which I feel in my joints, making me imagine I was loose-limbed again. But more than anything, it's the feeling of space, of the moment expanding, the faith that, during these three months, I might do anything. That's an adolescent's faith, to be sure, but it has lingered, as if there might be (to borrow a phrase from a favorite episode of "The Twilight Zone")
BOOKS
February 1, 1987 | Richard Eder
Ron Carlson sees patterns in lives. He sees love, struggle that is sometimes rewarded and bravery. He also sees love turned cannibal, defeat, poltroonery and the doping effects of contemporary life. But the outcome of his stories, whether upbeat or the opposite, tends to be an outpouring instead of an evaporation of spirit. So he is a warm writer, and this makes the collection in "The News of the World" relatively unusual.
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