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August 11, 2007 | Charles J. Gans, Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Bassist Ron Carter sometimes wishes he could go back in time to the 1960s and play again with the Miles Davis Quintet -- one of the most acclaimed and influential small combos in jazz history. It's not that Carter, who turned 70 in May, is overly nostalgic. It's just that 40 years ago his bass could hardly be heard amid Davis' trumpet, Wayne Shorter's saxophones, Herbie Hancock's piano and Tony Williams' drums.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
** 1/2 RON CARTER "Mr. Bow-tie" "Blue Note" Bassist Ron Carter has often been ill-served by his own recordings. Those that have succeeded, including the 1970 lost classic "Uptown Conversation" and the four-star 1978 trio date "Third Plane," feature Carter on equal footing with his sidemen, rather than upfront and over-amplified in the leader's chair. "Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special To The Times
Class, quality and artistry defined Ron Carter's appearance Thursday at Catalina Bar & Grill. When the bassist and his players -- pianist Stephen Scott, drummer Payton Crossley and percussionist Steve Kroon -- stepped on stage in conservative suits and ties, they stood side by side for a moment, then bowed graciously to the full house.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2007 | Charles J. Gans, Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Bassist Ron Carter sometimes wishes he could go back in time to the 1960s and play again with the Miles Davis Quintet -- one of the most acclaimed and influential small combos in jazz history. It's not that Carter, who turned 70 in May, is overly nostalgic. It's just that 40 years ago his bass could hardly be heard amid Davis' trumpet, Wayne Shorter's saxophones, Herbie Hancock's piano and Tony Williams' drums.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special To The Times
Class, quality and artistry defined Ron Carter's appearance Thursday at Catalina Bar & Grill. When the bassist and his players -- pianist Stephen Scott, drummer Payton Crossley and percussionist Steve Kroon -- stepped on stage in conservative suits and ties, they stood side by side for a moment, then bowed graciously to the full house.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Was all the effort that went into this recording worth it? Well, yes and no. Yes, in that Davis' elite mid-'60s rhythm section comes together surprisingly well, though in different fashion than when they cut such landmark discs as "E.S.P.," "Miles Smiles" and "Nefertiti." No, in that the cool camaraderie of the originals is lost, replaced instead by a glossed over give-and-take that succeeds on individual delivery rather than on group presentation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1998 | Don Heckman
There are some surprising similarities between bassists Ron Carter and Gary Peacock. Born two years apart under the sign of Taurus--Carter is 61, Peacock is 63--both have performed in a wide array of settings, and both are held in universally high esteem by jazz musicians of every age and style. Carter, who is especially well regarded as a composer in Japan, where he is one of the best-selling artists in jazz, has spent more time writing for large--often unusually instrumented--ensembles.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
* * * Lewis Nash, "Rhythm Is My Business," Evidence. Best known as the drummer with Tommy Flanagan and others, Nash makes a promising debut as leader of a group fortified by Mulgrew Miller's piano and the fine vibes of Steve Nelson. The program is well chosen, with a minor blues by Nash ("106 Nix"), a racehorse version of "My Shining Hour," and an amusing "Omelette" that's really a two-bass hit, with Ron Carter on piccolo bass and Peter Washington on bass.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1998 | Don Heckman
There are some surprising similarities between bassists Ron Carter and Gary Peacock. Born two years apart under the sign of Taurus--Carter is 61, Peacock is 63--both have performed in a wide array of settings, and both are held in universally high esteem by jazz musicians of every age and style. Carter, who is especially well regarded as a composer in Japan, where he is one of the best-selling artists in jazz, has spent more time writing for large--often unusually instrumented--ensembles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
** 1/2 RON CARTER "Mr. Bow-tie" "Blue Note" Bassist Ron Carter has often been ill-served by his own recordings. Those that have succeeded, including the 1970 lost classic "Uptown Conversation" and the four-star 1978 trio date "Third Plane," feature Carter on equal footing with his sidemen, rather than upfront and over-amplified in the leader's chair. "Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Was all the effort that went into this recording worth it? Well, yes and no. Yes, in that Davis' elite mid-'60s rhythm section comes together surprisingly well, though in different fashion than when they cut such landmark discs as "E.S.P.," "Miles Smiles" and "Nefertiti." No, in that the cool camaraderie of the originals is lost, replaced instead by a glossed over give-and-take that succeeds on individual delivery rather than on group presentation.
SPORTS
October 22, 1989 | HANDEL WHITMORE
Marshall 48, Verdugo Hills 27--Mark Gutierrez passed for 247 yards and five touchdowns to lead Marshall in a Northern Conference game at Verdugo Hills. Gutierrez connected with Miguel Osorio on scoring passes of 13, 27 and 41 yards, hit Ramon Altruz with a 63-yard touchdown pass and found Ron Carter for a 52-yard scoring pass. Verdugo Hills quarterback Lance Novak completed 17 of 28 passes for 183 yards.
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