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Ron Chernow

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October 10, 2010 | By Douglas Brinkley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Washington A Life Ron Chernow Penguin Press: 906 pp., $40 On Dec. 14, 1799, an ominous, fog-like gloom hung over Mount Vernon. Sixty-seven-year-old George Washington was dying. The ex-president, his doctors believed, was suffering from "quinsy" (a throat inflammation). In fact, Washington had contracted a vicious bacterial infection. His windpipe was swollen shut. Washington may have defeated the British at the Battle of Yorktown in 1781, but an inflamed epiglottis got the best of him in 1799.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2010 | By Douglas Brinkley, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Washington A Life Ron Chernow Penguin Press: 906 pp., $40 On Dec. 14, 1799, an ominous, fog-like gloom hung over Mount Vernon. Sixty-seven-year-old George Washington was dying. The ex-president, his doctors believed, was suffering from "quinsy" (a throat inflammation). In fact, Washington had contracted a vicious bacterial infection. His windpipe was swollen shut. Washington may have defeated the British at the Battle of Yorktown in 1781, but an inflamed epiglottis got the best of him in 1799.
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BOOKS
October 17, 1993 | Stefan Kanfer, Stefan Kanfer's newest book is "The Last Empire, De Beers, Diamonds and the World," recently published by Farrar, Strauss & Giroux
When Frederick Morton published his landmark biography of the Rothschilds in 1966, the economy was vigorous, interest rates were attractive and savings-and-loan organizations enjoyed a robust reputation. Today the engine is in reverse, and few depositors would disagree with Mark Twain's definition of a banker as "a fellow who lends his umbrella when the sun is shining and wants it back the minute it begins to rain."
BOOKS
April 25, 2004 | Richard Brookhiser, Richard Brookhiser is the author of several books, including "Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington" and "Alexander Hamilton, American."
We carry his face in our wallets, on the 10-dollar bill; we know he was killed in a duel 200 years ago this July by Vice President Aaron Burr. Yet in the present Founders' revival, Alexander Hamilton -- bastard, immigrant, adulterer, genius, journalist, begetter of our prosperity -- has so far escaped a full-dress treatment. Now, Ron Chernow, whose previous books have chronicled the American Beauty roses and kudzu vines of mature American capitalism -- Warburgs, Morgans, John D. Rockefeller Sr.
BOOKS
November 7, 1993
I was really amused at the photographs in the Oct. 17 Book Review section. Ron Chernow, William Gibson and Richard Reeves--all with contemplative hands to heads. A photographer's idea of how writers should look? Gibson and Chernow are probably contemplating nothing more rousing than a haircut, and Reeves undoubted can't remember where he put his keys! FRANCES HALPERN, MONTECITO
BOOKS
April 25, 2004 | Richard Brookhiser, Richard Brookhiser is the author of several books, including "Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington" and "Alexander Hamilton, American."
We carry his face in our wallets, on the 10-dollar bill; we know he was killed in a duel 200 years ago this July by Vice President Aaron Burr. Yet in the present Founders' revival, Alexander Hamilton -- bastard, immigrant, adulterer, genius, journalist, begetter of our prosperity -- has so far escaped a full-dress treatment. Now, Ron Chernow, whose previous books have chronicled the American Beauty roses and kudzu vines of mature American capitalism -- Warburgs, Morgans, John D. Rockefeller Sr.
BOOKS
May 31, 1998 | RICHARD PARKER, Richard Parker is an economist and senior fellow at the Joan Shorenstein Center, John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University
Who, except for the historians, should care about the era of John D. Rockefeller Sr., J.P. Morgan and Andrew Carnegie today? After all, how could that time (and they) be anything but dimly relevant to our own?
BOOKS
April 22, 1990 | John Rothchild, Rothchild, author of "A Fool and His Money" (Penguin), is working on a book about the Campeau debacle for Simon & Schuster.
Bankers have never been popular and are often blamed for everything. In the last century, several states actually banned bankers, the way they might outlaw nude dancers or firecracker salesmen today. Texas didn't lift its ban on bankers until 1904. (Note: Given the number of bank and S&L fraud cases currently pending, perhaps Texas should reconsider.) For their part, bankers have done their best to be as secretive, aloof and uncommunicative with the general public as possible.
NEWS
November 28, 1990 | Associated Press
The historical novel, "Middle Passage," which chronicles the journey of a freed African slave returning to his homeland, won the 1990 National Book Award competition for fiction Tuesday night. Charles Johnson, an English professor at the University of Washington, wrote the book, which takes place in the 1830s and tells the story of a terrifying voyage taken by the slave en route to his native Africa on a clipper ship. It was published by Atheneum.
NATIONAL
January 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
Bob Dylan, the unofficial poet laureate of the rock 'n' roll generation, has now been officially placed alongside such literary greats as Philip Roth and Adrienne Rich, not to mention biographers of Shakespeare and Willem de Kooning. All were among nominees announced Saturday for the National Book Critics Circle prizes. Dylan, whose memoir "Chronicles, Volume One" was a favorite with reviewers and readers, is among the finalists in the biography/autobiography category.
BOOKS
May 31, 1998 | RICHARD PARKER, Richard Parker is an economist and senior fellow at the Joan Shorenstein Center, John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University
Who, except for the historians, should care about the era of John D. Rockefeller Sr., J.P. Morgan and Andrew Carnegie today? After all, how could that time (and they) be anything but dimly relevant to our own?
BOOKS
November 7, 1993
I was really amused at the photographs in the Oct. 17 Book Review section. Ron Chernow, William Gibson and Richard Reeves--all with contemplative hands to heads. A photographer's idea of how writers should look? Gibson and Chernow are probably contemplating nothing more rousing than a haircut, and Reeves undoubted can't remember where he put his keys! FRANCES HALPERN, MONTECITO
BOOKS
October 17, 1993 | Stefan Kanfer, Stefan Kanfer's newest book is "The Last Empire, De Beers, Diamonds and the World," recently published by Farrar, Strauss & Giroux
When Frederick Morton published his landmark biography of the Rothschilds in 1966, the economy was vigorous, interest rates were attractive and savings-and-loan organizations enjoyed a robust reputation. Today the engine is in reverse, and few depositors would disagree with Mark Twain's definition of a banker as "a fellow who lends his umbrella when the sun is shining and wants it back the minute it begins to rain."
BOOKS
April 22, 1990 | John Rothchild, Rothchild, author of "A Fool and His Money" (Penguin), is working on a book about the Campeau debacle for Simon & Schuster.
Bankers have never been popular and are often blamed for everything. In the last century, several states actually banned bankers, the way they might outlaw nude dancers or firecracker salesmen today. Texas didn't lift its ban on bankers until 1904. (Note: Given the number of bank and S&L fraud cases currently pending, perhaps Texas should reconsider.) For their part, bankers have done their best to be as secretive, aloof and uncommunicative with the general public as possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2006 | From the Associated Press
"A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America," an account of the years between the Declaration of Independence and the end of the Revolutionary War when Benjamin Franklin represented the new American republic in Paris, has won the second annual $50,000 George Washington Prize. The author, Stacy Schiff, won a Pulitzer Prize in 2000 for her biography "Vera," about the wife of Russian American novelist Vladimir Nabokov.
BOOKS
June 13, 1999
Gregory Branson, film art director: "Titan" by Ron Chernow (Random House). "This biography of John D. Rockefeller gives insight into a man that we've all heard of but know little about and has definitely held my interest." **** Howard Russo, advertising creative director: "Rabbit, Run" by John Updike (Ballantine). "Through the struggles of a former high school basketball star, readers will better understand how and why life can be so difficult.
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