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Ron Dittemore

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OPINION
February 16, 2003
Re "Risks of Space Worth It, Some at Caltech Say," Feb. 6: Is it worth it? Is it worth it to dream? Is it worth it to strive beyond our boundaries? Those of us who haven't the courage, the brains or the opportunity can only stand on the sidelines and cheer. To reach for the stars is worth almost any price. I can't believe that anyone questions it. My thanks to those who rise toward the heavens on small metal candles, taking us where our hearts yearn to go. Diane Silver Lancaster The U.S. manned space program is too expensive, too dangerous and of questionable scientific value.
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OPINION
February 16, 2003
Re "Risks of Space Worth It, Some at Caltech Say," Feb. 6: Is it worth it? Is it worth it to dream? Is it worth it to strive beyond our boundaries? Those of us who haven't the courage, the brains or the opportunity can only stand on the sidelines and cheer. To reach for the stars is worth almost any price. I can't believe that anyone questions it. My thanks to those who rise toward the heavens on small metal candles, taking us where our hearts yearn to go. Diane Silver Lancaster The U.S. manned space program is too expensive, too dangerous and of questionable scientific value.
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NATIONAL
February 6, 2003 | Eric Malnic, Times Staff Writer
Ron Dittemore, the manager of NASA's space shuttle program, has a tough job. Since Saturday, it's gotten a lot tougher. "As the manager, he's responsible for the most complicated space vehicle in the world, from the nose cone to the tail," said a good friend, Bruce Hilty, a top-ranking NASA official.
NATIONAL
February 6, 2003 | Eric Malnic, Times Staff Writer
Ron Dittemore, the manager of NASA's space shuttle program, has a tough job. Since Saturday, it's gotten a lot tougher. "As the manager, he's responsible for the most complicated space vehicle in the world, from the nose cone to the tail," said a good friend, Bruce Hilty, a top-ranking NASA official.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A former Marine officer who has held engineering and management jobs in three NASA centers is taking over as manager of the space shuttle program as the space agency tries to recover from the Columbia disaster. William W. Parsons, 47-year-old director of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, was named the new manager of the space shuttle program, succeeding Ron Dittemore, who acted as NASA's most prominent spokesman after the loss of Columbia.
NEWS
February 1, 2000 | Associated Press
Computer trouble and bad weather forced NASA on Monday to delay the launch of space shuttle Endeavour on a quest to create the most accurate map of Earth ever produced. Launch managers said they would try again today, but only if the computer problem can be solved quickly. Liftoff time would be 12:44 p.m. Program manager Ron Dittemore said the launch would have to be delayed a week to replace the computerized unit, called a master events controller. It is a critical component.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2002 | From Associated Press
After a week of grueling, nonstop work, NASA cleared space shuttle Endeavour for a Friday liftoff and declared the ship's damaged robot arm safe to fly. The decision came late Wednesday, less than 24 hours after the countdown clocks began ticking. Mission Control quickly relayed the good news to the three residents of the international space station. They have been on board since June, and Endeavour is their ride home.
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | United Press International
Discovery's launch on the 40th shuttle mission, scheduled for 4:05 a.m. PDT today from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, would be the second of 1991. A delay because of bad weather was considered possible as of late Monday. It would be the 12th flight for the Discovery since 1984.
NATIONAL
April 20, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Ron Dittemore, manager of NASA's space shuttle program, is expected to resign as early as this week and move to a job in private industry, a government source said Saturday. Immediately after the space shuttle Columbia was destroyed Feb. 1, Dittemore took the lead role in explaining what the space agency knew before the disaster and whether it could have been prevented.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
Expedition Six, as the three-person crew on the international space station is called, arrived by shuttle in November and is scheduled to stay until March. There are enough supplies aboard to last until June, shuttle program manager Ron Dittemore said. In addition, Russia launched a previously scheduled supply vessel Sunday with a load of scientific equipment, fuel, food and mail for the crew. It is scheduled to arrive Tuesday.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2002 | From Reuters
NASA will begin repairs to cracked fuel lines on its grounded fleet of space shuttles next week and may be able to launch a mission as early as Sept. 28, the U.S. space agency said Friday. But the wait will be even longer for Israel's first astronaut, Ilan Ramon, who had been scheduled for a 16-day science mission in mid-July along with six U.S. astronauts on the shuttle Columbia.
NATIONAL
November 17, 2002 | From Reuters
Monday's scheduled launch of the space shuttle Endeavour has been delayed for at least several days and possibly more than a month because of an accident caused by a distracted launch-pad worker, the space agency said Saturday. Space agency officials said the Endeavour would now launch no earlier than Friday. It is to deliver a new crew and a 45-foot segment to the International Space Station.
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