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Ron Emory

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM
Set against the Joykiller's story of high hopes amid the burgeoning new commercial possibilities for punk rock is a cautionary episode: Ron Emory, one of the most distinguished and influential guitarists in the history of Orange County punk, was cut loose after disputes with his former partners over his reliability and his use of heroin. Emory, who first played with Joykiller singer Jack Grisham in T.S.O.L.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, the chances of Jack Grisham, Ron Emory and Mike Roche getting together again to play concerts as three-fourths of the original T.S.O.L. seemed remote. A more probable reunion might have been at a funeral, with one of them--most likely Emory or Roche--in a coffin and the others in mourning. Drugs and alcohol have been a scourge for T.S.O.L.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hey, hey, hey, come out and play," goes the refrain of the Offspring hit that is the most widely heard punk rock song ever to come out of Orange County. Jack Grisham and Ron Emory, whose old band, T.S.O.L., is cited as an influence by the Offspring, have decided to heed that catchy piece of advice. Singer Grisham and guitarist Emory will come out and play their first concert in more than 1 1/2 years tonight at Dragonfly in Hollywood, fronting a new band, the Joykillers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM
Set against the Joykiller's story of high hopes amid the burgeoning new commercial possibilities for punk rock is a cautionary episode: Ron Emory, one of the most distinguished and influential guitarists in the history of Orange County punk, was cut loose after disputes with his former partners over his reliability and his use of heroin. Emory, who first played with Joykiller singer Jack Grisham in T.S.O.L.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1987 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
After hearing T.S.O.L.'s new "Hit and Run" album--the former punk band's most diverse and accessible LP ever--some longtime followers may accuse the quartet of finally going Hollywood. It wouldn't be the first time such an accusation has been leveled at the veteran outfit, but this time it may be true. T.S.O.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not long ago, the chances of Jack Grisham, Ron Emory and Mike Roche getting together again to play concerts as three-fourths of the original T.S.O.L. seemed remote. A more probable reunion might have been at a funeral, with one of them--most likely Emory or Roche--in a coffin and the others in mourning. Drugs and alcohol have been a scourge for T.S.O.L.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The original TSOL is back, or at least three-fourths of it is. Singer Jack Grisham, guitarist Ron Emory and bassist Mike Roche are scheduled to play tonight along with X, the Bags, the Adolescents and the Crowd at an invitation-only concert at Track 16 Gallery in Santa Monica, marking the close of the exhibit "Forming: The Early Days of L.A. Punk."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
Bands as diversely individualistic as the Fabulous Thunderbirds, Poi Dog Pondering, the B.H. Surfers and Timbuk 3 have found a receptive home in Austin, Tex., which explains, in a way, why the nucleus of Junkyard had to move from there to Los Angeles to make it.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN
Bands as diversely individualistic as the Fabulous Thunderbirds, Poi Dog Pondering, the B.H. Surfers and Timbuk3 have found a receptive home in Austin, Tex., which explains, in a way, why the nucleus of Junkyard had to move from there to L.A. to make it. Where in hipper climes the five-piece outfit would justly be dismissed as nothing more than a recycling center for hard-rock cliches already exhausted by Aerosmith, Lynyrd Skynyrd, AC/DC and a host of others, in L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hey, hey, hey, come out and play," goes the refrain of the Offspring hit that is the most widely heard punk rock song ever to come out of Orange County. Jack Grisham and Ron Emory, whose old band, T.S.O.L., is cited as an influence by the Offspring, have decided to heed that catchy piece of advice. Singer Grisham and guitarist Emory will come out and play their first concert in more than 1 1/2 years tonight at Dragonfly in Hollywood, fronting a new band, the Joykillers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1987 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
After hearing T.S.O.L.'s new "Hit and Run" album--the former punk band's most diverse and accessible LP ever--some longtime followers may accuse the quartet of finally going Hollywood. It wouldn't be the first time such an accusation has been leveled at the veteran outfit, but this time it may be true. T.S.O.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2001
ANAHEIM 6:30pm Pop Music Couldn't score a ticket to Social Distortion's sold-out stint at the new House of Blues in Anaheim? Another veteran band that helped O.C. punk scene get rolling more than two decades ago is playing not far away. TSOL, with original singer Jack Grisham, guitarist Ron Emory and bassist Mike Roche in the current lineup, will make it an old-school punk night in Anaheim with their appearance at Chain Reaction, a benefit for the Surfrider Foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1989 | MIKE BOEHM
When the responsibilities of being a young father and the pressures of college course work begin to weigh on Frank Agnew, he sometimes finds himself taking the long way home. It leads him to a place from his past--a nondescript, concrete apartment complex in a quiet neighborhood of Fullerton, across a narrow street from a schoolyard.
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