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Ron George

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
You've got to give percussionist/composer Ron George credit. If anyone can make music out of a roomful of gongs, cymbals, chimes and assorted industrial waste metal, he can. At Beyond Baroque in Venice on Saturday night, George played a half-hour solo piece--"Variations on a Butterfly"--that called up impressions of everything from a Javanese Gamelan orchestra to the theater pieces of Harry Partch.
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SPORTS
October 8, 1992 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Stanford linebacker Ron George doesn't succeed in the NFL, he has an alternate career choice. George would like to be a fireman. "I'm dead serious," George said. "I don't know what I want to do with my whole life. I know I don't want to sit behind a desk for the next five years and waste energy when I could be doing something that's concrete and based in some sense of reality."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even in the world of avant-garde music, it's unusual for a composer to build his or her own instruments. But percussionist Ron George has been doing that for nearly two decades. George will use the largest instrument he has ever built--he calls it the "ballad console"--in programs Saturday at the Newport Harbor Art Museum. "The instrument has a frame that goes up 12 feet and is 15 feet wide," George said in an interview last week from his studio in downtown Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even in the world of avant-garde music, it's unusual for a composer to build his or her own instruments. But percussionist Ron George has been doing that for nearly two decades. George will use the largest instrument he has ever built--he calls it the "ballad console"--in programs Saturday at the Newport Harbor Art Museum. "The instrument has a frame that goes up 12 feet and is 15 feet wide," George said in an interview last week from his studio in downtown Los Angeles.
SPORTS
October 8, 1992 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Stanford linebacker Ron George doesn't succeed in the NFL, he has an alternate career choice. George would like to be a fireman. "I'm dead serious," George said. "I don't know what I want to do with my whole life. I know I don't want to sit behind a desk for the next five years and waste energy when I could be doing something that's concrete and based in some sense of reality."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1997
After 30 years of public service in South Gate, Ron George is leaving behind big shoes--so big, it seems, that it takes two men to fill them. George, 52, chief of police for nine years and interim city manager for 2 1/2, has spent the past year grooming his successors. Andrew Pasmant, a former deputy city manager, took over the top staff position Monday. Deputy Police Chief George Troxcil will take over the department after George's retirement June 12.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1993
If you benefited by the loopholes during the Reagan and Bush years, you may be part of the reason the deficit is so large, and now it's "pay-back" time! Ron and George giveth and Willie now wants to taketh some back to balance the books! EARL S. DRAIMIN Sepulveda
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1987 | JOHN HENKEN
The thought of an extended composition devoted to sensory deprivation must give pause to the most intrepid musical adventurer. But Sunday evening at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, Theodore Peterson's "Dr. John Wants to Talk to Dolphins" proved an irresistibly sensuous, surprisingly upbeat experience. Heard on a program presented by the Independent Composers Assn., "Dr. John" deals not with isolation, but with the human results.
NEWS
October 17, 1991
A volunteer committee dedicated to keeping city youths out of gangs and in school has received a prestigious award for its efforts. The Commission for South Gate Youth received the 1991 Governor's Crime Prevention Award for "outstanding service, leadership and excellence in crime prevention." The commission was formed two years ago by Police Chief Ron George.
NEWS
August 30, 1990
The City Council has approved spending $126,400 confiscated from drug dealers to buy nine used vehicles for the Police Department. Police Chief Ron George said the vehicles will be used by gang-control detectives. South Gate has a total of $1.8 million in a fund from the seizure of drug dealers' assets. In another action, the council hired William F. Cornett Jr. to serve as a consultant and as interim city administrator through Nov. 26 while the city looks for a permanent chief administrator.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
You've got to give percussionist/composer Ron George credit. If anyone can make music out of a roomful of gongs, cymbals, chimes and assorted industrial waste metal, he can. At Beyond Baroque in Venice on Saturday night, George played a half-hour solo piece--"Variations on a Butterfly"--that called up impressions of everything from a Javanese Gamelan orchestra to the theater pieces of Harry Partch.
NEWS
May 4, 1989
The South Gate City Council has voted to spend $46,400 to start an anti-gang program in the city's elementary schools and one junior high school. The council unanimously approved spending the money for anti-gang instruction for fourth- and fifth-grade students at the city's nine elementary schools and South Gate Junior High School, which are on a year-round schedule. About 4,000 students will receive instruction from counselors from the county Juvenile Assistance Diversion Effort program.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1990 | TERRY McQUILKIN
Perhaps it was fitting that Steve Reich was the one major composer represented on Saturday's program at Barnsdall Park. While the three relatively new works on the program delivered by the new-music ensemble eXindigo! are not strictly minimalist, each shows minimalist traits.
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