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Ron Hansen

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SPORTS
November 19, 1993 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pilot of a small plane noticed the body, which had washed up on the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay. In a preliminary examination, authorities determined that the body was small and male, and that set off speculation at every racetrack in California that it was Ron Hansen, the jockey who has been missing since the early-morning hours of Oct. 2, when his expensive sports car, traveling at about 100 m.p.h., rear-ended another car on the San Mateo Bridge.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On March 19, 1927, Ruth Snyder and her lover Henry Judd Gray murdered Ruth's husband, Albert Edward Snyder, in his bed in Queens Village, New York. The murder plan was poorly conceived and badly carried out and in less than 24 hours the police had enough evidence to arrest Snyder and Gray. Whose plan was it? Who was the driving force in the murder? Who should get the death penalty? These questions remained for the trial that was held in the Queens County courtroom. It was one of the most publicized, highly attended, written and talked about events in a decade known for debauchery.
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BOOKS
February 18, 1996 | Paul Hemphill, Paul Hemphill's "The Heart of the Game: The Education of a Minor-League Ballplayer" will be published in April by Simon & Schuster
Although his publisher is shilling Ron Hansen's fourth novel as "an ingenious murder mystery," that won't quite do. There are many mysteries involved in this taut story of familial estrangement, murder certainly being one of them. But at the true center of the book is an exploration of one of the most compelling mysteries of all: the anguished and abiding love of a father for his son, no matter what.
BOOKS
May 11, 2008 | Minna Proctor, Minna Proctor is the author of "Do You Hear What I Hear? Religious Calling, the Priesthood, and My Father."
The GREAT Sicilian mystery writer Leonardo Sciascia once quipped, "A man who dies tragically is, at any moment of his life, a man who will die tragically." For the historical novelist, this is a potent proposal -- essentially, the dramatic key to a story in which the ending is predetermined and plot twists are not an option.
BOOKS
May 11, 2008 | Minna Proctor, Minna Proctor is the author of "Do You Hear What I Hear? Religious Calling, the Priesthood, and My Father."
The GREAT Sicilian mystery writer Leonardo Sciascia once quipped, "A man who dies tragically is, at any moment of his life, a man who will die tragically." For the historical novelist, this is a potent proposal -- essentially, the dramatic key to a story in which the ending is predetermined and plot twists are not an option.
BOOKS
October 10, 1999 | PETER GREEN, Peter Green is the former fiction critic of the London Daily Telegraph
On Sept. 18, 1931, Hitler's favorite niece, Geli Raubal, was shot and killed, with her uncle's Walther pistol, in the bedroom she occupied in his Munich apartment. She was 23 years old. The door was locked from the inside, and her death was, with uncommon speed, ruled a suicide. Rumors, then and later, abounded. Uncle and niece had been involved, Svengali to Trilby, in an incestuous sexual relationship with kinky undertones.
SPORTS
July 14, 1997 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An admitted race-fixer and friend of late jockey Ron Hansen, whose body was found on a levee near the San Mateo Bridge three years ago, said the Northern California rider was not the victim of a gang murder. The name of Hansen, who in 1990 was suspended for six weeks by Golden Gate Fields in a race-fixing investigation, has resurfaced following investigations into suspicious races at Bay Meadows and Los Alamitos.
SPORTS
March 14, 1990 | JAY HOVDEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ron Hansen, the leading Bay Area jockey who has been effectively barred from riding at California thoroughbred tracks for more than a month, got a favorable ruling from the California Horse Racing Board on Tuesday. He could be back in the saddle as early as this afternoon. In accepting the recommendation of Ben Felton, special hearing referee, the CHRB overruled the unilateral decision Golden Gate Fields management made last Feb.
SPORTS
May 3, 1990 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wearing a two-day stubble on his chin, jockey Ron Hansen stood under the roof at the barn of Video Ranger on a rainy morning, answering questions about his Bohemian lifestyle and controversial riding career. "You should have been with me last night," Hansen said to a handful of reporters who are at Churchill Downs to cover Saturday's Kentucky Derby. There were a few chuckles. "I'm just kidding," Hansen said. "I'm very happily married now." And about that wedding, Ron . . .
SPORTS
March 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Jockey Ron Hansen's request for a temporary restraining order that would allow him to race at Golden Gate Fields has been denied for a second time. Alameda County Superior Court Judge Demetrios Agretelis ruled Tuesday that Hansen hadn't exhausted his administrative remedies to challenge a Feb. 4 decision by the Albany race course denying Hansen access in attempting to prove the San Francisco Bay area's leading jockey bribed other riders to manipulate races.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2007 | Paul Wilner, Special to The Times
Cupertino, Calif. He's just off a plane from the New York premiere of "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford," adapted from his novel of the same name, and the reviews have been decidedly mixed, but Ron Hansen seems unperturbed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2001 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"A stay against confusion" is how Robert Frost described the essential function of poetry, but novelist Ron Hansen borrows the same phrase and applies it to religion. In a collection of confessional essays that adopts Frost's phrase as its title, Hansen allows us to see for ourselves how a passion for God and a passion for the writing life--so often at odds with each other in contemporary literature--enrich his work as a novelist.
BOOKS
October 10, 1999 | PETER GREEN, Peter Green is the former fiction critic of the London Daily Telegraph
On Sept. 18, 1931, Hitler's favorite niece, Geli Raubal, was shot and killed, with her uncle's Walther pistol, in the bedroom she occupied in his Munich apartment. She was 23 years old. The door was locked from the inside, and her death was, with uncommon speed, ruled a suicide. Rumors, then and later, abounded. Uncle and niece had been involved, Svengali to Trilby, in an incestuous sexual relationship with kinky undertones.
SPORTS
July 8, 1998 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A visitor to Richie Sklar brought a box of chocolates. "Is there a Racing Form in there?" Sklar asked. "Just kidding. I'm able to get the Form." A convicted race fixer, Sklar is nearing the end of a six-month sentence. The federal government nailed him for bribing jockeys to hold horses in two Arabian races and one for thoroughbreds at Los Alamitos three years ago. But investigators were disappointed and frustrated when they couldn't uncover more, and said Sklar's penalty was lenient.
SPORTS
July 14, 1997 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An admitted race-fixer and friend of late jockey Ron Hansen, whose body was found on a levee near the San Mateo Bridge three years ago, said the Northern California rider was not the victim of a gang murder. The name of Hansen, who in 1990 was suspended for six weeks by Golden Gate Fields in a race-fixing investigation, has resurfaced following investigations into suspicious races at Bay Meadows and Los Alamitos.
BOOKS
February 18, 1996 | Paul Hemphill, Paul Hemphill's "The Heart of the Game: The Education of a Minor-League Ballplayer" will be published in April by Simon & Schuster
Although his publisher is shilling Ron Hansen's fourth novel as "an ingenious murder mystery," that won't quite do. There are many mysteries involved in this taut story of familial estrangement, murder certainly being one of them. But at the true center of the book is an exploration of one of the most compelling mysteries of all: the anguished and abiding love of a father for his son, no matter what.
SPORTS
November 12, 1992 | Associated Press
A spectacular fall on the home stretch sent two jockeys flying and cost a horse its life Wednesday at Bay Meadows. Stellar Spell had to be destroyed after breaking a leg in the accident. But jockeys Ron Hansen and Ron Warren, who was knocked off his own mount by the falling horse, escaped serious injury. Hansen was maneuvering Stellar Spell at the top of the stretch when her left front leg snapped. She collapsed, catapulting Hansen forward onto the track.
BOOKS
October 13, 1991 | Michael Harris
MARIETTE IN ECSTASY by Ron Hansen (Harper Collins: $19.95; 192 pp.) Religions, like people, grow old; they lose their tolerance for the enthusiasms that stirred their own youth. "Mariette in Ecstasy" is the story of a 17-year-old girl who enters a Catholic convent in Upstate New York on a postulant, or trial, basis in 1906. The stigmata--the wounds of Christ on the Cross--repeatedly appear on her hands, feet and side. In medieval times, Mariette would have become a saint.
SPORTS
January 25, 1994 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A badly decomposed body found last week on a levee near the San Mateo Bridge in Northern California was identified Monday as that of Ron Hansen, the jockey who has been missing for more than three months. Confirmation that the body was Hansen's came from the Alameda County sheriff's office after a comparison of dental records. The body was discovered by a truck driver last Thursday. Hansen, who would have been 34 on Jan. 5, had been missing since an early morning accident on the bridge on Oct.
SPORTS
January 21, 1994 | Associated Press
Authorities believe a body found Thursday could be the remains of jockey Ron Hansen, who mysteriously disappeared in early October. The badly decomposed body was found in the mud flats of Hayward, near the San Mateo Bridge, Alameda police said. Hansen's dental records were sent to the Department of Justice, Lt. David Guarnieri said, and the coroner's office could be slowed in the identification process. He said it could take more than 24 hours.
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