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Ron K Unz

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NEWS
May 8, 1994 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When 32-year-old theoretical physicist Ron Unz decided to run for governor, even some friends tried to talk him out of it. "Politics is not the kind of thing you expect geniuses to go into," said Eric Reyburn, who attended Harvard University with Unz. Rivko Knox, Unz's aunt, worried that the race would be brutal. "I said: 'Can you take criticism? What if you speak and people laugh at you?' " David Horowitz, the conservative activist, was more blunt.
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NEWS
October 6, 1999 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to position himself as a courageous outsider eager to tackle issues that mainstream politicians ignore, software entrepreneur Ron Unz--leader of last year's winning war on bilingual education--Tuesday declared himself a Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate seat of Democrat Dianne Feinstein. Unz, 38, said he jumped into the race because politicians of both parties "are avoiding issues that are important to society but are considered too controversial" by elected officials.
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NEWS
May 27, 1994 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson's reelection campaign is running into trouble in Republican-rich Orange County, with one-third of GOP voters saying they intend to cast their ballot for his relatively unknown opponent in the June 7 primary and a fifth saying they will defect to the Democrats in November, according to a Times Orange County Poll.
OPINION
May 30, 1999 | Scott Holleran, Scott Holleran has written about politics and health care for the Miami Herald and the Philadelphia Inquirer
Software entrepreneur Ron K. Unz, the Silicon Valley millionaire who led the successful campaign to end bilingual education in California's public schools last July, has a new crusade: campaign-finance reform. While campaigning for the anti-bilingual initiative, Proposition 227, Unz says he was shocked by what he calls California's "wild, wild West" electoral system.
NEWS
April 5, 1994 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Capping a months-long "stealth campaign" intended to take Gov. Pete Wilson by surprise, a 32-year-old Silicon Valley entrepreneur plans this week to launch a $1-million, statewide media blitz to introduce California voters to what his literature calls "the Republican candidate for governor." Ron K.
NEWS
May 22, 1998 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of Univision Communications, one of the most prominent Spanish-language media companies in the United States, has given a whopping $1.5 million from his own pocket to fight California's anti-bilingual education initiative, a campaign finance statement filed Thursday shows. The contribution by A.
NEWS
February 6, 1998 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are the missionaries of bilingual education in a state with more immigrant students than any other, true believers who have staked their careers on the premise that teaching those children in two languages is better than teaching in English alone. Some grew up with a language other than English in a time when educators shamed or punished students who spoke in their native tongues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1998 | ERIC BAILEY and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Year in, year out, for a decade running, California lawmakers have tried to produce new standards for bilingual education in the state's classrooms. They have always flunked. One bill was vetoed. A dozen others never even made it that far. Now, state legislators are at it again, taking a last stab at reform before the California electorate does the job for them.
OPINION
May 30, 1999 | Scott Holleran, Scott Holleran has written about politics and health care for the Miami Herald and the Philadelphia Inquirer
Software entrepreneur Ron K. Unz, the Silicon Valley millionaire who led the successful campaign to end bilingual education in California's public schools last July, has a new crusade: campaign-finance reform. While campaigning for the anti-bilingual initiative, Proposition 227, Unz says he was shocked by what he calls California's "wild, wild West" electoral system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1997 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The powerful California Teachers Assn. joined with a coalition of education groups Tuesday to denounce a June ballot proposal that seeks to dismantle bilingual education in the state. State education groups called the planned initiative an extremist measure that will end up hurting California's 1.4 million students who speak little or no English.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three decades ago, this desert city was the birthplace of the national bilingual education movement, a point of pride among many Latinos here. For them, Spanish-language classrooms are as much a part of the local landscape as the saguaro cactus. This year, Ron Unz came to Tucson launching a voter initiative that would do away with bilingual education in Arizona, a plan nearly identical to the one he wrote and California voters approved last year.
NEWS
May 22, 1998 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of Univision Communications, one of the most prominent Spanish-language media companies in the United States, has given a whopping $1.5 million from his own pocket to fight California's anti-bilingual education initiative, a campaign finance statement filed Thursday shows. The contribution by A.
NEWS
February 6, 1998 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They are the missionaries of bilingual education in a state with more immigrant students than any other, true believers who have staked their careers on the premise that teaching those children in two languages is better than teaching in English alone. Some grew up with a language other than English in a time when educators shamed or punished students who spoke in their native tongues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1998 | ERIC BAILEY and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Year in, year out, for a decade running, California lawmakers have tried to produce new standards for bilingual education in the state's classrooms. They have always flunked. One bill was vetoed. A dozen others never even made it that far. Now, state legislators are at it again, taking a last stab at reform before the California electorate does the job for them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1997 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The powerful California Teachers Assn. joined with a coalition of education groups Tuesday to denounce a June ballot proposal that seeks to dismantle bilingual education in the state. State education groups called the planned initiative an extremist measure that will end up hurting California's 1.4 million students who speak little or no English.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aiming for a showdown vote in June, critics of bilingual education on Thursday turned in the first batch of voter signatures needed for a statewide measure that would require all-English instruction in classrooms. "We're advocating common sense," said Ron K. Unz, the Silicon Valley software entrepreneur who is leading the campaign. "We're advocating teaching English to the children as quickly as possible when they start school."
BUSINESS
June 6, 1994 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you listen past the noisy accusations, you could almost get the idea that the candidates for governor are of a single mind when it comes to helping California's beleaguered economy. Jobs, they earnestly declare, are needed more than ever. Red-tape gridlock must be broken up. Small business deserves a break. Defense conversion is vital. New, environmentally clean technologies are a key to the future. Sound familiar?
BUSINESS
June 6, 1994 | JONATHAN PETERSON
* Gov. Pete Wilson Jobs: Supports tax credit for jobs creation, acceleration of Caltrans contracts, improved business climate. Taxes: Calls for a more competitive tax structure. Pushed to make permanent the tax credit for research and development and supports tax credits for investments in small business. Bureaucracy: Signed bills to streamline hazardous-waste permits and require agencies to weigh the economic impact of regulations before they take effect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1997 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billionaire businessman Ron Unz took his campaign to virtually end bilingual education in California into hostile territory Saturday when he appeared at a community forum in the Pico-Union district on Latino issues.
NEWS
June 7, 1994 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
On the final day of the primary campaign, California's gubernatorial candidates Monday leveled one last barrage of pleas at the state's voters, each concluding the campaign in much the same way it was conducted. Democrats Kathleen Brown, John Garamendi and Tom Hayden tramped throughout California lamenting the state's condition and vowing to make things better if voters go their way.
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