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Ron Luciano

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SPORTS
August 9, 1986
In my 30-plus years of watching baseball games on TV and at the ballparks I have never seen umpires miss as many easy calls as I have seen this year. They seem to be taking a cue from Don Denkinger, who made himself a household name by making easily the worst call in the World Series history last year, costing the St. Louis Cardinals a world championship. The latest colossal call comes from Drew Coble who, while standing on top of the play, could not see Bob Boone of the Angels miss Bill Buckner of the Red Sox by a foot on a play at home plate on July 26. If the umpires keep making calls like these they will ruin the game for the fans and the players.
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SPORTS
January 20, 1995 | From Associated Press
The death of former major league umpire Ron Luciano, whose theatrical style made him a favorite among baseball fans, was classified Thursday as a suicide, police said. In a brief statement, Endicott police said an autopsy performed by Broome County coroner Dr. Michael McCarville concluded that Luciano, 57, died of carbon monoxide poisoning. Lt. Harlan Ayers said no additional information or details will be released by authorities.
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SPORTS
May 28, 1988
Former American League umpire Ron Luciano said it would set baseball back 30 years if the major leagues hired female umpire Pam Postema. Luciano makes it sound as if the first female umpire must be superior to all her male counterparts, like some kind of Wonder Woman, in order to qualify for the job. That's like saying a person has to be a race-car driver in order to qualify for a driver's license. KENNETH ZIMMERMAN Cypress
SPORTS
January 19, 1995 | From Associated Press
Ron Luciano, a former major league umpire who brought great showmanship to the job, was found dead Wednesday in the garage of his home. He was 57. Police said Luciano was discovered at about 3:50 p.m. in the garage area of his home in Endicott, just west of Binghamton. Broome County coroner Dr. Michael McCarville ordered Luciano's body taken to Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Binghamton for an autopsy. A preliminary investigation showed no apparent signs of foul play, said Endicott police Lt.
SPORTS
January 20, 1995 | From Associated Press
The death of former major league umpire Ron Luciano, whose theatrical style made him a favorite among baseball fans, was classified Thursday as a suicide, police said. In a brief statement, Endicott police said an autopsy performed by Broome County coroner Dr. Michael McCarville concluded that Luciano, 57, died of carbon monoxide poisoning. Lt. Harlan Ayers said no additional information or details will be released by authorities.
SPORTS
January 19, 1995 | From Associated Press
Ron Luciano, a former major league umpire who brought great showmanship to the job, was found dead Wednesday in the garage of his home. He was 57. Police said Luciano was discovered at about 3:50 p.m. in the garage area of his home in Endicott, just west of Binghamton. Broome County coroner Dr. Michael McCarville ordered Luciano's body taken to Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Binghamton for an autopsy. A preliminary investigation showed no apparent signs of foul play, said Endicott police Lt.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1985 | PAUL HENNIGER, Times Staff Writer
As the NCAA Basketball Championship Tournament wears on, most Southland basketball buffs, especially those who love the college brand, are ho-humming their way through it . . . maybe even ignoring it. The shutout of all local schools cooled any heavy interest. But for the Al McGuires out there, the basketball freaks who can't get enough and wish it was a year-round sport, this will be another banner weekend. CBS has scheduled double-headers of regional finals today and Sunday.
SPORTS
February 14, 1986
Today's Morning Briefing is devoted to some selected excerpts from "Baseball's Greatest Insults," a Simon & Schuster publication compiled by Kevin Nelson. Broadcaster Richie Ashburn, hearing that an equipment man had been summoned to repair Dave Kingman's glove: "They should have called a welder." Cincinnati broadcaster Joe Nuxhall, on Pete Rose: "I'll tell you how smart Pete is. When they had the blackout in New York, he was stranded 13 hours on an escalator."
SPORTS
August 28, 1989
Ron Luciano, author and entertainer, made his living as an umpire until one day some simple arithmetic convinced him he was in the wrong business. "Umpires are supposed to keep their place," he said. "If a player was making $20,000 a year, I would have minded my own business. But I figured out that Jim Rice was making $582 for every strike I called and I was making seven cents. Seven cents. There's no way I'm going to keep my place for seven cents."
SPORTS
May 28, 1988
Former American League umpire Ron Luciano said it would set baseball back 30 years if the major leagues hired female umpire Pam Postema. Luciano makes it sound as if the first female umpire must be superior to all her male counterparts, like some kind of Wonder Woman, in order to qualify for the job. That's like saying a person has to be a race-car driver in order to qualify for a driver's license. KENNETH ZIMMERMAN Cypress
SPORTS
August 9, 1986
In my 30-plus years of watching baseball games on TV and at the ballparks I have never seen umpires miss as many easy calls as I have seen this year. They seem to be taking a cue from Don Denkinger, who made himself a household name by making easily the worst call in the World Series history last year, costing the St. Louis Cardinals a world championship. The latest colossal call comes from Drew Coble who, while standing on top of the play, could not see Bob Boone of the Angels miss Bill Buckner of the Red Sox by a foot on a play at home plate on July 26. If the umpires keep making calls like these they will ruin the game for the fans and the players.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1985 | PAUL HENNIGER, Times Staff Writer
As the NCAA Basketball Championship Tournament wears on, most Southland basketball buffs, especially those who love the college brand, are ho-humming their way through it . . . maybe even ignoring it. The shutout of all local schools cooled any heavy interest. But for the Al McGuires out there, the basketball freaks who can't get enough and wish it was a year-round sport, this will be another banner weekend. CBS has scheduled double-headers of regional finals today and Sunday.
SPORTS
September 9, 2004 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
A .500 average is nothing for an umpire to brag about. But it didn't keep the late Ron Luciano from telling a story on himself in one of his two books. Reader David Macaray, in response to a Morning Briefing item about Paul Lo Duca winning an argument with an umpire, passed it along in an e-mail: "After a called strike three on the home team's catcher, the disgruntled player turned to Luciano and said, 'Come on, Ron, you called that identical pitch a ball just two innings ago.'
SPORTS
January 23, 1995 | MAL FLORENCE
Matthew Lubanko of Newsday suggests a warm-up act for the Super Bowl, calling it the Tundra Bowl. Some of the rules: "Take the NFL's two worst teams and force them to play the Saturday night before Super Bowl Sunday in Green Bay, Wis. The National Weather Service says the average low temperature in Green Bay in January is 9 degrees--an appropriate stage setting for the league's two coldest teams."
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