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Ron Mass

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1994 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slowly, like a wounded soldier who had outlived the war, Ron Mass walked unflinchingly Thursday from a Sherman Oaks hospital where he has endured more than five months of painful rebirth since being severely burned during last fall's Old Topanga blaze.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1995 | FRANK MANNING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The charcoal skeletons of manzanita shrubs stand as eerie reminders of the clear blue autumn morning two years ago today, when, without warning, the hillside above Ron Mass' home erupted in flames. Over time, generous rains have nurtured explosions of greenery, helping to heal the scorched earth around Deer Creek Ranch, where the Malibu fire began. But for the 42-year-old Mass, who still lives in the same place, memories linger that even the rain can't wash away.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1994 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slowly, like a wounded soldier who had outlived the war, Ron Mass walked unflinchingly Thursday from a Sherman Oaks hospital where he had endured more than five months of surgery since being severely burned during last fall's Calabasas-Malibu wildfire. His feet wrapped in bandages, his face, neck, arms and hands showing the blotchy red ravages of countless skin grafts, Mass ended a 163-day recuperation that was the longest inpatient stay in the 25-year history of the Sherman Oaks Burn Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1994 | ERIC SLATER
When they arrived at the hospital, Ron Mass' sisters were at first unsure that the charred man was their brother--until they looked toward the end of the gurney. "We saw his feet and knew it was him," said his sister Marlena Hernandez. "He has pretty feet." On Thursday, one year and one day after Mass escaped the Topanga Canyon fires by running through a corridor of flame, his feet were visible, and arguably still pretty, through a pair of Birkenstock sandals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1994 | ERIC SLATER
When they arrived at the hospital, Ron Mass' sisters were at first unsure that the charred man was their brother--until they looked toward the end of the gurney. "We saw his feet and knew it was him," said his sister Marlena Hernandez. "He has pretty feet." On Thursday, one year and one day after Mass escaped the Topanga Canyon fires by running through a corridor of flame, his feet were visible, and arguably still pretty, through a pair of Birkenstock sandals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1995 | FRANK MANNING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The charcoal skeletons of manzanita shrubs stand as eerie reminders of the clear blue autumn morning two years ago today, when, without warning, the hillside above Ron Mass' home erupted in flames. Over time, generous rains have nurtured explosions of greenery, helping to heal the scorched earth around Deer Creek Ranch, where the Malibu fire began. But for the 42-year-old Mass, who still lives in the same place, memories linger that even the rain can't wash away.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Mass' appearance lays bare what he has endured. The skin on his face is smoother now, no longer the charcoal black it was before the grafts or the blotchy red that followed. His arms are a donors' medley of white, pink and brown. And from a distance the bandage over his chest looks like a T-shirt. The Nov. 2 brush fire that raged through Topanga Canyon seared 90% of his body.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1995
In a ceremony that featured tributes from patients and firefighters, the Burn Center at Sherman Oaks Hospital saluted its 25th anniversary Thursday by renaming the acclaimed facility after its founder and medical director. With the help of children who had been his patients, Dr. A. Richard Grossman unveiled a sign declaring it the Grossman Burn Center at Sherman Oaks Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1993
Family and friends of a Topanga carpenter badly burned during a heroic attempt to save a friend the day the Calabasas/Malibu fire broke out established a fund Saturday to help pay for his medical bills. Ron Mass, 40, was in critical condition Saturday after undergoing surgery at the Sherman Oaks Burn Center, said hospital spokesman Larry Weinberg.
NEWS
October 26, 1994
It was one year ago today that the first of 17 firestorms swept through Southern California's bone-dry forests and foothills. Adding to the frightening specter of the rampaging flames was the fact that the worst of the blazes--in Malibu and Laguna--were ignited by arsonists. In all, the flames claimed three lives, more than 200,000 acres and caused untold millions of dollars in damage. Underlying those numbing statistics are hundreds of stories of adversity and resiliency.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Mass' appearance lays bare what he has endured. The skin on his face is smoother now, no longer the charcoal black it was before the grafts or the blotchy red that followed. His arms are a donors' medley of white, pink and brown. And from a distance the bandage over his chest looks like a T-shirt. The Nov. 2 brush fire that raged through Topanga Canyon seared 90% of his body.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1994 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slowly, like a wounded soldier who had outlived the war, Ron Mass walked unflinchingly Thursday from a Sherman Oaks hospital where he has endured more than five months of painful rebirth since being severely burned during last fall's Old Topanga blaze.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1994 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slowly, like a wounded soldier who had outlived the war, Ron Mass walked unflinchingly Thursday from a Sherman Oaks hospital where he had endured more than five months of surgery since being severely burned during last fall's Calabasas-Malibu wildfire. His feet wrapped in bandages, his face, neck, arms and hands showing the blotchy red ravages of countless skin grafts, Mass ended a 163-day recuperation that was the longest inpatient stay in the 25-year history of the Sherman Oaks Burn Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1993 | REBECCA BRYANT
Ronald Mass, still recovering in the Sherman Oaks Burn Center, is getting a little help from friends he's never met. Topanga Canyon residents are putting on a benefit concert to raise money for the carpenter who suffered second- and third-degree burns over 75% of his body during the Calabasas/Malibu fire on Nov. 2. The concert came together in typical Topanga fashion.
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