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Ron Mclarty

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NEWS
June 16, 1995 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Janice Arkatov is a regular contributor to The Times
The cocoa is deadly in Ron McLarty's "Akela," opening tonight--in its world premiere--as the Road Theatre's inaugural production at the new Lankershim Arts Center. "Mary is a teacher who goes on a camping trip with a group of Cub Scouts," says director David Gianopolous. "No one realizes there's been a spillage of waste into the river. That night, she has a few beers; the kids have cocoa--and some of them die."
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NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Laura Shin, Special to The Times
Spend an hour with Ron McLarty, and you'll get hints that he's a cursed man, a charmed man, a caveman, a super-human, a comedian and a fly-fishing fan. Viewers of "Sex and the City," "The Practice" and "Law & Order" know him as an actor. But in the three decades that McLarty, 57, sat at a desk for five hours every morning writing 44 plays, 10 novels and countless poems and short stories, no one ever called him a novelist -- until Stephen King. It was June 2003.
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NEWS
January 20, 2005 | Laura Shin, Special to The Times
Spend an hour with Ron McLarty, and you'll get hints that he's a cursed man, a charmed man, a caveman, a super-human, a comedian and a fly-fishing fan. Viewers of "Sex and the City," "The Practice" and "Law & Order" know him as an actor. But in the three decades that McLarty, 57, sat at a desk for five hours every morning writing 44 plays, 10 novels and countless poems and short stories, no one ever called him a novelist -- until Stephen King. It was June 2003.
NEWS
June 16, 1995 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Janice Arkatov is a regular contributor to The Times
The cocoa is deadly in Ron McLarty's "Akela," opening tonight--in its world premiere--as the Road Theatre's inaugural production at the new Lankershim Arts Center. "Mary is a teacher who goes on a camping trip with a group of Cub Scouts," says director David Gianopolous. "No one realizes there's been a spillage of waste into the river. That night, she has a few beers; the kids have cocoa--and some of them die."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2003 | From Associated Press
Actor Ron McLarty, whose long struggle to publish a novel was greatly helped by a plug from Stephen King, has agreed to a two-book deal with Viking Penguin. King, in his featured column for Entertainment Weekly, recently cited McLarty's "The Memory of Running" as a novel "that can do more than walk; it has a chance to be a breakout bestseller." The book, which had been available only in audio form, soon became the object of a seven-publisher bidding war.
NEWS
September 3, 2000 | ROCHELLE O'GORMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two collections of short stories, very different but equally entertaining, have recently been released on audio. Highly anticipated was "Interpreter of Maladies," by Jhumpa Lahiri. The winner of many literary prizes, including the Pulitzer Prize and the O. Henry Award, this is a rare treat, as the stories are as delightful as the presentation. (Soundelux Audio Publishing; unabridged; four cassettes; six hours; $24.95; read by Matilda Novak.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1996 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Two new comedies join prime time tonight. NBC's "3rd Rock From the Sun" stars John Lithgow as lead alien in a sometimes-funny foursome from another planet on a research mission to Earth. ABC's "Champs," on the other hand, just plays like something from Pluto.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1990 | TERRY ATKINSON
THIS WEEK'S MOVIES It's a great week for a video study of big stars wasting their talent and our time in poor-value vehicles. Robin Williams dependably puts the pedal to the metal in "Cadillac Man" (Orion, $94.98, R)--but somebody forgot to fuel up the script of this 1990 model.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2008 | STEVE HARVEY
It was just one of those weird coincidences. A bomb threat was called in to the courthouse in San Fernando recently, and soon afterward a bag was spotted under a bench in front of the building. The building was locked down, and while everyone awaited the arrival of explosives experts, a man inside the court approached one of the officers and said, "Oh, hey, I left my lunch over there. Can I just go get it real quick?" Turns out he thought he couldn't bring his tuna sandwich into the courthouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Why do men war with and kill each other? Great ideals? Land, gold, beautiful women? In his 1983 comic novel, "The Feud," Thomas Berger suggests that we fight and die because of stupidity and stubbornness, geography and lies. Berger's story--about a daffily escalating small-town vendetta, engendered by trifles and proceeding to catastrophes--is great movie material. But the film that's been made from it, Bill D'Elia's "The Feud" (at the Fine Arts), shows little imagination, less intensity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1995 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An unmarried female teacher takes a group of Cub Scouts camping. She has a few beers, the kids have cocoa, then all drift peacefully to sleep under the starlit Colorado sky. When the woman awakens the next morning, she discovers, to her horror, that her young charges have expired soundlessly.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
As frothy and underwhelming as a decaf double latte, "Trump Unauthorized" is a breezy biopic charting the rise and fall of one of the icons of '80s overindulgence as he takes Manhattan like a demented Muppet, lets it all ride on Atlantic City and eventually reinvents himself as a TV star. Justin Louis plays Donald J. Trump as an unctuous, tenacious young man trying to deal his way out of the shadow of his successful developer father, Fred Sr.
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