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June 18, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Sexsmith was on his way to a wedding Wednesday as he discussed his new album, "Whereabouts," which sounds like the work of a man worried that he is on his way to a divorce. The groom was the Canadian singer-songwriter's bass player, Jim Vesely, who was to be hitched in a public garden in San Francisco--a stop on a tour that brings Sexsmith, Vesely and drummer-cellist Don Kerr to the Coach House on Saturday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2008 | Mikael Wood, Special to The Times
They don't serve drinks yet at Largo's lovely new space at the Coronet Theatre, but Thursday night Ron Sexsmith had his small but attentive audience there covered. This Canadian singer-songwriter makes impeccably crafted folk-pop records that warm the insides like a top-shelf whiskey, and at Largo, Sexsmith included in his 80-minute set several tunes that described the pleasures to be found from fermentation. In "One Last Round" he narrated a trip "into town" to "drink our bottles down."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1997
* Just like her mother's, Liza Minnelli's career has become a high-wire act. "It's in my blood. I could never do anything else." * The dilemma of being Harrison Ford, trademark. * Documenta X wasn't worth the five-year wait. * Ron Sexsmith is sensitive about being called sensitive.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Joni Mitchell's "For the Roses" has stood for nearly three decades as the song about the dehumanizing nature of the music business. It's a bitter, accusatory tale about how mercenary businessmen savage an artist's spirit by tossing around new records "like the latest golden egg . . . wondering if the next one in the nest will glitter for them so."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1999 | STEVE APPLEFORD
*** Ron Sexsmith, "Whereabouts," Interscope. The Canadian is usually a no-frills kind of guy. But on his third album (being released Tuesday), the singer-songwriter sets his words of longing and spirituality across a hypnotic pop soundscape of strings, horns and soft beats. On "Right About Now," Sexsmith even finds a soulful romantic vibe that lands right where Al Green meets the Plastic Ono Band. A strangely soothing brew.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1997 | ROBERT HILBURN
You could feel the magic of the old Troubadour in the West Hollywood club Thursday night as Ron Sexsmith played 90 minutes of the songs that make him one of the most promising singer-songwriter arrivals in years. In the '60s and early '70s, the Troubadour was the national showcase for folk-based singer-songwriters, hosting such quality artists as Joni Mitchell, Tim Hardin, John Prine, James Taylor and Randy Newman.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2008 | Mikael Wood, Special to The Times
They don't serve drinks yet at Largo's lovely new space at the Coronet Theatre, but Thursday night Ron Sexsmith had his small but attentive audience there covered. This Canadian singer-songwriter makes impeccably crafted folk-pop records that warm the insides like a top-shelf whiskey, and at Largo, Sexsmith included in his 80-minute set several tunes that described the pleasures to be found from fermentation. In "One Last Round" he narrated a trip "into town" to "drink our bottles down."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Joni Mitchell's "For the Roses" has stood for nearly three decades as the song about the dehumanizing nature of the music business. It's a bitter, accusatory tale about how mercenary businessmen savage an artist's spirit by tossing around new records "like the latest golden egg . . . wondering if the next one in the nest will glitter for them so."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1997 | Robert Hilburn
There were half a dozen extremely moving songs on this folk-accented singer-songwriter's 1995 Interscope debut album. You wouldn't expect that much gentle grace to surface anywhere in a calendar year, much less on the same collection. This time, Sexsmith--whose vocals suggest the quivering intimacy of the late Tim Hardin and whose melodies carry the caress of a summer breeze--delivers an even more consistent and ambitious set of tunes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Touring together, Dar Williams and Ron Sexsmith form a Sane Poet Posse of singer-songwriters with an eloquent touch and a shared healthy-minded temperament that calls for lighting candles of hope and encouragement instead of cursing the darkness. At the Coach House, headliner Williams struck a slightly dizzy, humorously free-associating persona.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Standing on stage under the blue neon Troubadour sign Thursday night, Ron Sexsmith seemed like a visitor from a different era--a time three decades ago when singer-songwriters were royalty in pop music and the West Hollywood club was their castle. Back then, industry titans and taste makers gathered each Tuesday at the Troubadour to hear the latest in a seemingly endless parade of promising new singer-songwriters . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1999 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Sexsmith was on his way to a wedding Wednesday as he discussed his new album, "Whereabouts," which sounds like the work of a man worried that he is on his way to a divorce. The groom was the Canadian singer-songwriter's bass player, Jim Vesely, who was to be hitched in a public garden in San Francisco--a stop on a tour that brings Sexsmith, Vesely and drummer-cellist Don Kerr to the Coach House on Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1999 | STEVE APPLEFORD
*** Ron Sexsmith, "Whereabouts," Interscope. The Canadian is usually a no-frills kind of guy. But on his third album (being released Tuesday), the singer-songwriter sets his words of longing and spirituality across a hypnotic pop soundscape of strings, horns and soft beats. On "Right About Now," Sexsmith even finds a soulful romantic vibe that lands right where Al Green meets the Plastic Ono Band. A strangely soothing brew.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Touring together, Dar Williams and Ron Sexsmith form a Sane Poet Posse of singer-songwriters with an eloquent touch and a shared healthy-minded temperament that calls for lighting candles of hope and encouragement instead of cursing the darkness. At the Coach House, headliner Williams struck a slightly dizzy, humorously free-associating persona.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1997 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
Ron Sexsmith's dark hair drapes across his forehead, more reminiscent of Moe in the Three Stooges than anything you're likely to see on today's fashion pages. It's not as eye-catching as Lyle Lovett's old high-rise spectacular, but his hair definitely stamps Sexsmith as a man who doesn't worry about fitting in. "Actually, it's not a 'style,' " the soft-spoken singer-songwriter says good-naturedly. "It's more like surrender on my part.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1997
* Just like her mother's, Liza Minnelli's career has become a high-wire act. "It's in my blood. I could never do anything else." * The dilemma of being Harrison Ford, trademark. * Documenta X wasn't worth the five-year wait. * Ron Sexsmith is sensitive about being called sensitive.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Standing on stage under the blue neon Troubadour sign Thursday night, Ron Sexsmith seemed like a visitor from a different era--a time three decades ago when singer-songwriters were royalty in pop music and the West Hollywood club was their castle. Back then, industry titans and taste makers gathered each Tuesday at the Troubadour to hear the latest in a seemingly endless parade of promising new singer-songwriters . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1997 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times' pop music critic
Ron Sexsmith's dark hair drapes across his forehead, more reminiscent of Moe in the Three Stooges than anything you're likely to see on today's fashion pages. It's not as eye-catching as Lyle Lovett's old high-rise spectacular, but his hair definitely stamps Sexsmith as a man who doesn't worry about fitting in. "Actually, it's not a 'style,' " the soft-spoken singer-songwriter says good-naturedly. "It's more like surrender on my part.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1997 | ROBERT HILBURN
You could feel the magic of the old Troubadour in the West Hollywood club Thursday night as Ron Sexsmith played 90 minutes of the songs that make him one of the most promising singer-songwriter arrivals in years. In the '60s and early '70s, the Troubadour was the national showcase for folk-based singer-songwriters, hosting such quality artists as Joni Mitchell, Tim Hardin, John Prine, James Taylor and Randy Newman.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1997 | Robert Hilburn
There were half a dozen extremely moving songs on this folk-accented singer-songwriter's 1995 Interscope debut album. You wouldn't expect that much gentle grace to surface anywhere in a calendar year, much less on the same collection. This time, Sexsmith--whose vocals suggest the quivering intimacy of the late Tim Hardin and whose melodies carry the caress of a summer breeze--delivers an even more consistent and ambitious set of tunes.
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