Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRon Shelton
IN THE NEWS

Ron Shelton

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
January 16, 2000 | David Davis, David Davis is a freelance writer living in Los Angeles
On a May afternoon in Las Vegas, triple-digit temperatures cling to the Strip. The fight crowd that had gathered to watch Oscar De La Hoya beat Oba Carr for the WBC welterweight championship has retreated, leaving behind the heady aroma of blood, sweat and Budweiser. In its place, catering crews and screaming extras have taken over the arena at the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino. The transition is smooth: Hollywood has picked up where Oscar the Golden Boy left off.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2013 | By David Ng
The intersecting fan demographic for baseball and musical theater isn't large, but it is apparently substantial enough to warrant a new stage musical based on the popular 1988 movie "Bull Durham. " Producers announced Wednesday that the new musical will have its world premiere at the Alliance Theatre in Atlanta in September 2014. The musical features a script by Ron Shelton, who directed and wrote the original movie, and songs by Susan Werner. The original movie, which starred Kevin Costner, Susan Sarandon and Tim Robbins, follows a minor league veteran who is sent to Durham, N.C., to coach a rookie pitcher.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Writer-director Ron Shelton hasn't seen the new special-edition DVD of his 1988 baseball comedy "Bull Durham" (MGM, $25), although he did participate in the new documentary featured on the disc that arrives in stores today. He's also featured on a commentary track--but that was recorded four years ago for the movie's laserdisc release. "I just said what came into my mind," Shelton recalls. "I've never even heard it. I get more letters about that commentary and I don't even know what I said."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2010 | By Scott Collins, Los Angeles Times
In the fall of 1993, Michael Jordan — often regarded as the greatest player ever to shoot a basketball — shocked the sports world by announcing he was retiring from the NBA. Then he stunned fans again by deciding to pursue his long-held dream of playing pro baseball. Within months, the then-31-year-old high-flying guard known as "His Airness" was bobbling easy flies and swatting at bad pitches as a struggling right fielder for the minor-league Birmingham Barons. This surreal fillip in sports history, which ended up bisecting Jordan's phenomenal NBA career, forms the basis of "Jordan Rides the Bus," director Ron Shelton's documentary that premieres Tuesday on ESPN.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | PANCHO DOLL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Shelton, the writer, director and former minor league baseball player, will be on hand Sunday at the Ojai Playhouse to answer questions following the screening of "Cobb," his 1994 movie about the man who holds dual honors as the first inductee into the baseball Hall of Fame and the probably the most hated figure in the history of the sport. Ty Cobb was a bigot, a bully, a misogynist and, according to the movie, those weren't even his worst traits.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2003
Two cops who don't like each other much try to solve a murder. Meanwhile, they also have to keep up their second gigs: One's a yoga instructor and actor, the other a security guard. Guess which is which. * Action comedy (June 13) Columbia With: Harrison Ford, Josh Hartnett, Lena Olin, Bruce Greenwood. The idea: Mismatched cops, each with second jobs, tackle a high-profile murder. Writers: Robert Souza & Ron Shelton. Director: Ron Shelton.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2013 | By David Ng
The intersecting fan demographic for baseball and musical theater isn't large, but it is apparently substantial enough to warrant a new stage musical based on the popular 1988 movie "Bull Durham. " Producers announced Wednesday that the new musical will have its world premiere at the Alliance Theatre in Atlanta in September 2014. The musical features a script by Ron Shelton, who directed and wrote the original movie, and songs by Susan Werner. The original movie, which starred Kevin Costner, Susan Sarandon and Tim Robbins, follows a minor league veteran who is sent to Durham, N.C., to coach a rookie pitcher.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since he made his directorial debut with "Bull Durham," Ron Shelton has displayed a winning way of taking us into the contemporary world of sports--even for those whose interest in them is minimal at best.
SPORTS
June 15, 2008 | From the Associated Press
DURHAM, N.C. -- The bull still snarls from atop the outfield wall, snorting smoke after home runs and taunting hitters with four simple words written on it: Hit bull, win steak. The replica of the prop Hollywood built for "Bull Durham" is larger and glitzier than the original -- and in that way, it's like nearly everything else about today's Durham Bulls. Exactly 20 years have passed since the film hit theaters on June 15, 1988, and the modern-day Bulls bear little resemblance to the fictionalized crew portrayed on film by Kevin Costner and Tim Robbins.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1992 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is an inner game of basketball, but it has nothing to do with best-selling volumes on middle-class self-improvement. It's the game that takes place on every outdoor or rec center court or after-hours school gym in every inner city in the country. It is a black game, fast, vehement and always, one way or another, unforgiving--your ego is tested along with your body, and brute strength isn't enough to gain respect.
SPORTS
June 15, 2008 | From the Associated Press
DURHAM, N.C. -- The bull still snarls from atop the outfield wall, snorting smoke after home runs and taunting hitters with four simple words written on it: Hit bull, win steak. The replica of the prop Hollywood built for "Bull Durham" is larger and glitzier than the original -- and in that way, it's like nearly everything else about today's Durham Bulls. Exactly 20 years have passed since the film hit theaters on June 15, 1988, and the modern-day Bulls bear little resemblance to the fictionalized crew portrayed on film by Kevin Costner and Tim Robbins.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2003
Two cops who don't like each other much try to solve a murder. Meanwhile, they also have to keep up their second gigs: One's a yoga instructor and actor, the other a security guard. Guess which is which. * Action comedy (June 13) Columbia With: Harrison Ford, Josh Hartnett, Lena Olin, Bruce Greenwood. The idea: Mismatched cops, each with second jobs, tackle a high-profile murder. Writers: Robert Souza & Ron Shelton. Director: Ron Shelton.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Dark Blue," a brooding, ambitious film about the struggle for the soul of an elite Los Angeles cop, has to struggle with its own soul as well. Sensitively directed by Ron Shelton and helped by what just might be the best performance of Kurt Russell's career, "Dark Blue" is as interesting and successful as it can be within its limits, but those limits make this a more generic film than its makers intended.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Writer-director Ron Shelton hasn't seen the new special-edition DVD of his 1988 baseball comedy "Bull Durham" (MGM, $25), although he did participate in the new documentary featured on the disc that arrives in stores today. He's also featured on a commentary track--but that was recorded four years ago for the movie's laserdisc release. "I just said what came into my mind," Shelton recalls. "I've never even heard it. I get more letters about that commentary and I don't even know what I said."
MAGAZINE
January 16, 2000 | David Davis, David Davis is a freelance writer living in Los Angeles
On a May afternoon in Las Vegas, triple-digit temperatures cling to the Strip. The fight crowd that had gathered to watch Oscar De La Hoya beat Oba Carr for the WBC welterweight championship has retreated, leaving behind the heady aroma of blood, sweat and Budweiser. In its place, catering crews and screaming extras have taken over the arena at the Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino. The transition is smooth: Hollywood has picked up where Oscar the Golden Boy left off.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since he made his directorial debut with "Bull Durham," Ron Shelton has displayed a winning way of taking us into the contemporary world of sports--even for those whose interest in them is minimal at best.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Returning from a USO tour of Korea, Marilyn Monroe told her husband, New York Yankees Hall of Famer Joe DiMaggio: "Oh, Joe, it was wonderful. You never heard such cheers." DiMaggio's instant reply: "Yes, I have." Ron Shelton's office is crowded with memorabilia from a decade-long film career. The sweetest reminders are the freshest--a pile of rave reviews for "Bull Durham," his new film and directorial debut.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Dark Blue," a brooding, ambitious film about the struggle for the soul of an elite Los Angeles cop, has to struggle with its own soul as well. Sensitively directed by Ron Shelton and helped by what just might be the best performance of Kurt Russell's career, "Dark Blue" is as interesting and successful as it can be within its limits, but those limits make this a more generic film than its makers intended.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | PANCHO DOLL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ron Shelton, the writer, director and former minor league baseball player, will be on hand Sunday at the Ojai Playhouse to answer questions following the screening of "Cobb," his 1994 movie about the man who holds dual honors as the first inductee into the baseball Hall of Fame and the probably the most hated figure in the history of the sport. Ty Cobb was a bigot, a bully, a misogynist and, according to the movie, those weren't even his worst traits.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1992 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is an inner game of basketball, but it has nothing to do with best-selling volumes on middle-class self-improvement. It's the game that takes place on every outdoor or rec center court or after-hours school gym in every inner city in the country. It is a black game, fast, vehement and always, one way or another, unforgiving--your ego is tested along with your body, and brute strength isn't enough to gain respect.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|