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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1998
The Women in Theatre series of monthly "Actors Work-It" workshops continues Saturday, featuring director Ron Sossi, founder and artistic director of the Odyssey Theatre. The workshop will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. at CBS Studio Center, 4024 Radford Ave., Norvet Building, Multipurpose Room, Studio City. WIT is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the continuing education and development of theater professionals and to fostering community interest in the arts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
Apparently the Odyssey Theatre had a hit 35 years ago with Ron Sossi's staging of “White Marriage,” a madcap, expressionistic 1975 sex romp by the avant-garde Polish writer Tadeusz Rózewicz. The Odyssey's current revival of this play, while directed - again by Sossi - and acted with admirable frisky gusto, nonetheless gives off a whiff of the time capsule. Some plays are for the ages, transcending culture and context, but “White Marriage,” which serves up the preserved sociopolitical preoccupations and heavy symbolism of 1970s Eastern European theater like meats in aspic, may not be among them.  Set in Poland in about 1890, “White Marriage” (the English title is a clunky translation of the French term mariage blanc , meaning an unconsummated marriage)
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
One of the more intriguing things about Euripides' "Bacchae" is the latitude for interpretation that it presents. Written late in life, when Euripides was self-exiled in Macedonia, and therefore at a time of personal discontent, the play can be seen in any number of ways: as a general reaction against authority, as a war between fundamentalism and liberalism, between one side of a personality and another, between men and gods (read man and his fate).
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2012 | By F. Kathleen Foley
This post has been corrected. See below for details. Bless the actors in “Theatre in the Dark,” the cheerfully experimental new show at the Odyssey.  After all, what actor doesn't crave his or her moment in the spotlight?  But when a show is performed almost entirely in the dark, as in this case, the largely anonymous performances become very much a labor of love.  Call this the anti-vanity production. The concept of mounting plays in the dark is hardly unique.  Yet this particular endeavor, conceived and produced by Ron Sossi, the Odyssey's longtime artistic director, and Sally Essex-Lopresti, takes what could have been a mere gimmick to new heights.  In a seamless staging, the dozen performers move through the blackness with almost uncanny agility and poise.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Ron Sossi is scampering over piles of lumber, looking for just the right man-of-vision pose to appease a photographer. "This one is definitely a 'Bush' picture," he says with a grin, referring to Bill Bushnell, his friendly rival and the producing artistic director of Los Angeles Theatre Center, as he proudly surveys the new Odyssey Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1989
Please allow me to add a note to Janice Arkatov's Aug. 13 piece on the Odyssey Theatre--i.e., the facts concerning the City of L.A.'s rescue as the Odyssey lost its building of 16 years. Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky (and his aide, Ginny Kruger), did valiantly lead this effort, as mentioned, but I would be remiss not to add Mayor Tom Bradley to our hero list. The mayor and his cultural affairs coordinator, Valerie Fields, never hesitated to provide the time and personal touch necessary to the search and readying of a temporary site.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2012 | By F. Kathleen Foley
This post has been corrected. See below for details. Bless the actors in “Theatre in the Dark,” the cheerfully experimental new show at the Odyssey.  After all, what actor doesn't crave his or her moment in the spotlight?  But when a show is performed almost entirely in the dark, as in this case, the largely anonymous performances become very much a labor of love.  Call this the anti-vanity production. The concept of mounting plays in the dark is hardly unique.  Yet this particular endeavor, conceived and produced by Ron Sossi, the Odyssey's longtime artistic director, and Sally Essex-Lopresti, takes what could have been a mere gimmick to new heights.  In a seamless staging, the dozen performers move through the blackness with almost uncanny agility and poise.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN
There's no particular reason to grieve as the Odyssey Theatre locks the door for the last time on Ohio Avenue and moves to a new home not that far away. Moving on--that's what odysseys are about. If artistic director Ron Sossi were giving up the ship, there would be reason to grieve. But Sossi is a stayer. When he learned that his theater was about to lose its lease--to a video store, yet--he didn't whimper about how hard it is to do theater in Los Angeles. He found a new location.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1996 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea that sexually transmitted diseases are a punishment from an anthropomorphic God gets a full-length satirical treatment in Oskar Panizza's "Love Council" at the Odyssey Theatre. Ron Sossi's staging of this curiosity from 1894--freshly pertinent in the age of AIDS--is intoxicating. But the play's central conceit is so overextended that its intellectual edge eventually becomes dulled.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
Apparently the Odyssey Theatre had a hit 35 years ago with Ron Sossi's staging of “White Marriage,” a madcap, expressionistic 1975 sex romp by the avant-garde Polish writer Tadeusz Rózewicz. The Odyssey's current revival of this play, while directed - again by Sossi - and acted with admirable frisky gusto, nonetheless gives off a whiff of the time capsule. Some plays are for the ages, transcending culture and context, but “White Marriage,” which serves up the preserved sociopolitical preoccupations and heavy symbolism of 1970s Eastern European theater like meats in aspic, may not be among them.  Set in Poland in about 1890, “White Marriage” (the English title is a clunky translation of the French term mariage blanc , meaning an unconsummated marriage)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The best thing about "The Faust Projekt," now at the Odyssey Theatre, is its utter refusal to treat Goethe's formidable life's work like a big deal. It is one, of course: Uncut, its two parts taken together plus intermissions, the cosmically searching piece spans nearly 20 hours of stage time. In spirit, however, Goethe's treatment of the Faust legend is a lark. It subverts the tidier Christopher Marlowe "Doctor Faustus," while transcending it.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1998
The Women in Theatre series of monthly "Actors Work-It" workshops continues Saturday, featuring director Ron Sossi, founder and artistic director of the Odyssey Theatre. The workshop will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. at CBS Studio Center, 4024 Radford Ave., Norvet Building, Multipurpose Room, Studio City. WIT is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the continuing education and development of theater professionals and to fostering community interest in the arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1996 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea that sexually transmitted diseases are a punishment from an anthropomorphic God gets a full-length satirical treatment in Oskar Panizza's "Love Council" at the Odyssey Theatre. Ron Sossi's staging of this curiosity from 1894--freshly pertinent in the age of AIDS--is intoxicating. But the play's central conceit is so overextended that its intellectual edge eventually becomes dulled.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1993 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
One of the more intriguing things about Euripides' "Bacchae" is the latitude for interpretation that it presents. Written late in life, when Euripides was self-exiled in Macedonia, and therefore at a time of personal discontent, the play can be seen in any number of ways: as a general reaction against authority, as a war between fundamentalism and liberalism, between one side of a personality and another, between men and gods (read man and his fate).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1989
Please allow me to add a note to Janice Arkatov's Aug. 13 piece on the Odyssey Theatre--i.e., the facts concerning the City of L.A.'s rescue as the Odyssey lost its building of 16 years. Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky (and his aide, Ginny Kruger), did valiantly lead this effort, as mentioned, but I would be remiss not to add Mayor Tom Bradley to our hero list. The mayor and his cultural affairs coordinator, Valerie Fields, never hesitated to provide the time and personal touch necessary to the search and readying of a temporary site.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN
There's no particular reason to grieve as the Odyssey Theatre locks the door for the last time on Ohio Avenue and moves to a new home not that far away. Moving on--that's what odysseys are about. If artistic director Ron Sossi were giving up the ship, there would be reason to grieve. But Sossi is a stayer. When he learned that his theater was about to lose its lease--to a video store, yet--he didn't whimper about how hard it is to do theater in Los Angeles. He found a new location.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1986 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
"I wanted to do something wicked." Everyone has such feelings at one time or another, but we'll just have to assume that directing John Guare's "Bosoms and Neglect" (opening today at the Odyssey Theatre) is about as far as Ron Sossi is willing to go when it comes to going public with confessions of nasty desires. "I wanted to do this play three years ago, but couldn't cast it," he said. "I wound up doing 'Marie and Bruce' instead.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1987 | DON SHIRLEY
Lily Tomlin pulled a leg muscle during "The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe" on Tuesday. The show ended prematurely, and performances were canceled at the Doolittle Theatre for Wednesday, tonight and possibly Friday. It's turning into an eventful week for Tomlin, who accepted a California Theatre Award at a ceremony Monday. One night later, the injury occurred as Tomlin, playing the character of Chrissy, began an aerobics routine.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Ron Sossi is scampering over piles of lumber, looking for just the right man-of-vision pose to appease a photographer. "This one is definitely a 'Bush' picture," he says with a grin, referring to Bill Bushnell, his friendly rival and the producing artistic director of Los Angeles Theatre Center, as he proudly surveys the new Odyssey Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1988
Ron Sossi runs the Odyssey Theatre Ensemble, a West Los Angeles complex of three theaters of fewer than 100 seats each. It was established in Hollywood in 1969 as an Equity showcase, but soon became non-Equity until 1972, when the Equity Waiver came in. Last year, Sossi's theater showed an income of $510,563 and expenses of $578,113. Odyssey actors' made $32,502 . Sossi's salary has averaged $150 a week over 19 years.
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