Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRon Stout
IN THE NEWS

Ron Stout

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trumpeter Ron Stout will tell you that his heart is in straight-ahead jazz. And when he performs, you can count on hearing such standards and jazz classics as "Gone With the Wind," "Summertime" and Sonny Rollins' "Pent Up House" as well as originals. Stout likes to put his mark on the evergreens by playing them "not the way everybody else has." "Instead of having bookend arrangements--you know, melody, solos, melody--I like to try something different.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Between sets Tuesday during trumpeter Ron Stout's appearance at the Cafe Lido, a visitor from Boston who studied saxophone at the Berklee School of Music there let Stout know that she'd been disappointed looking for what she called a real jazz show in Southern California. Disappointed, that is, until she turned up to hear Stout's quintet. It was easy to understand her enthusiasm for the trumpeter's opening set.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1993 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Between sets Tuesday during trumpeter Ron Stout's appearance at the Cafe Lido, a visitor from Boston who studied saxophone at the Berklee School of Music there let Stout know that she'd been disappointed looking for what she called a real jazz show in Southern California. Disappointed, that is, until she turned up to hear Stout's quintet. It was easy to understand her enthusiasm for the trumpeter's opening set.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trumpeter Ron Stout will tell you that his heart is in straight-ahead jazz. And when he performs, you can count on hearing such standards and jazz classics as "Gone With the Wind," "Summertime" and Sonny Rollins' "Pent Up House" as well as originals. Stout likes to put his mark on the evergreens by playing them "not the way everybody else has." "Instead of having bookend arrangements--you know, melody, solos, melody--I like to try something different.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
Since introducing his enlarged Silver Brass Ensemble a year ago at Catalina Bar & Grill, pianist Horace Silver made a successful album, but a serious illness prevented him from touring to promote it. Tuesday night he brought the same group back to the Hollywood club for an engagement that continues through Sunday. Silver's return to good health and to the club scene is welcome news to the jazz community.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
After touring with a quintet for 30-plus years, pianist Horace Silver has formed a nine-piece brass ensemble that made its bow at Catalina on Tuesday, continuing through Sunday. Silver's talents as a composer are well suited to this larger canvas. On one tune he used a call-and-response effect, with the two trombones and French horn statements answered by three riffing trumpets. Best of all was his decision to "do something different" with the familiar chord changes of "Body and Soul."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
There was something about the look of the Bob Florence Limited Edition Big Band Monday night at the Jazz Bakery that was reminiscent of a football Saturday at the Coliseum. Spread across the stage, six saxophone players in front, four trombonists behind them, five trumpeters topping the lineup with a four-piece rhythm section at the side, the image resonated with the look of the USC Trojans, crisply positioned in a full spread power lineup. The imagery didn't stop there.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Mention an area of the music business and saxophonist-composer Tom Scott -- a veteran of gigs and/or recordings with George Harrison, Joni Mitchell and Sting among dozens of others -- has probably been there. But lately he's been stretching his interests even wider, producing and arranging music for Daniel Rodriguez, the Singing Policeman, while putting together the music for his own Bebop Septet.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
Ghost bands are too often exactly what the name implies: dim and shadowy apparitions from a glorious past. But the current Woody Herman Herd is a vigorous, full-blooded exception. Monday night at the Civic Center in Hermosa Beach, the 15-piece unit displayed the qualities that have made the Herman name a virtual synonym for energy and swing for more than half a century.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Saxophonist Dan St. Marseille reaches a new level of expression on his third recording for his Orange-based Resurgent Music label. Part of the reason for his newfound intensity can be found in the rhythm section that bassist Henry Franklin assembled for the date.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
In an entertainment world overflowing with multi-hyphenates, Jack Sheldon stands on his own. One could easily add, after his name, a string of professional identities that would include trumpeter, singer, comedian, actor, television personality and all-around raconteur. A highly visible presence on the Southland stage since the mid-'50s, he continues to provide a consistently engaging blend of first-rate jazz and no-holds-barred comedic jiving.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The big band is the symphony orchestra of jazz -- one of the most vital sounds of 20th century American music. So it's not surprising that this musical cornucopia of sounds, textures and rhythms continues to fascinate musicians and listeners, even at a time when the economics of the entertainment world make it difficult to maintain 15- to 20-piece ensembles.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|